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  #1  
Old 03-10-2009, 08:03 AM
coderguy1939 coderguy1939 is offline
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Default Heme positive stool

Suggestions would be appreciated for the above. Thanks.
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Old 03-10-2009, 08:09 AM
Lisa Bledsoe Lisa Bledsoe is offline
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792.1
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Old 03-10-2009, 09:41 AM
lring lring is offline
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Default Heme positive stool

792.1 is correct - to code it you would go to "findings, abnormal, without diagnosis" in ICD-9 and then go to "stool" - under that you would find 'occult' - and this is a code under 'signs, symptoms and ill-defined conditions' so you aren't giving someone a diagnosis but rather a symptom
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Old 03-11-2009, 04:43 AM
tuffy1 tuffy1 is offline
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I use 578.1 blood in stool. Because Heme is blood.
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Old 03-11-2009, 06:16 AM
RebeccaWoodward* RebeccaWoodward* is offline
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I agree with Lisa and LRing

Occult blood means the blood is hidden to the eye. When a hemoccult test comes back positive for this hidden blood, you should use 792.1 (Nonspecific abnormal findings in stool contents). Blood in the stool that is visible, appearing as either bright red streaks or tarry black stools, you should use 578.1
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Old 03-13-2009, 09:48 AM
coderguy1939 coderguy1939 is offline
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How do you determine if heme positive stool refers to occult blood or simply blood in stool. My understanding of an occult DX is that the patient has provided fecal smears on three successive days. I would think that would need to be documented in order to use 792.1.
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Old 03-13-2009, 11:04 AM
RebeccaWoodward* RebeccaWoodward* is offline
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As you know, the hemoccult test screens for blood in the stool. It detects a small trace of blood visible to the naked eye. Blood which is hidden from view is referred to as "occult" bleeding. Hemoccult = hidden blood=729.1
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Old 03-13-2009, 11:39 AM
coderguy1939 coderguy1939 is offline
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So is what you are saying is that heme positive blood is sufficient documenation to use 792.1?
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Old 03-13-2009, 12:06 PM
Lisa Bledsoe Lisa Bledsoe is offline
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I would say yes.
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:17 AM
coderguy1939 coderguy1939 is offline
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THanks for all your input. I appreciate it.
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