Share Your Expertise in HBM

Share your expertise or discover new expertise through HBM_NewsRoomresearch. Concentrate your efforts on providing members with relevant information and advice, with supporting examples, based on cited evidence or references.

Here are a few of the ways you can contribute to your magazine:

  • CPCs®: Offer real-world coding and billing advice.
  • Chapter officers: Turn a chapter presentation into an article.
  • Practice managers: Write about a business obstacle and solution you experienced firsthand in your practice or facility.
  • Auditors: Share best practices for conducting internal audits.
  • Compliance officers: Inform practices of regulatory changes that may affect them.
  • Payers: Educate providers on essential documentation elements.

Help us achieve our goal to inform, enlighten, and prepare our members for continued success.

Healthcare Business Monthly reserves the right to edit or reject any submission. Writers are not monetarily compensated, but may qualify for free CEUs. Send inquiries to Brad Ericson (brad.ericson@aapc.com) or John Verhovshek (g.john.verhovshek@aapc.com).

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Alex McKinley

Alex McKinley

Alex McKinley is AAPC’s senior marketing communications manager. Prior to his work at AAPC he worked in the tax and accounting industry. He received his bachelor's degree in Mass Communications (Public Relations Emphasis) from the University of Utah.
Alex McKinley

About Has 57 Posts

Alex McKinley is AAPC’s senior marketing communications manager. Prior to his work at AAPC he worked in the tax and accounting industry. He received his bachelor's degree in Mass Communications (Public Relations Emphasis) from the University of Utah.

One Response to “Share Your Expertise in HBM”

  1. Ernest Sari, CPB says:

    Every coder and biller dreams of one day owning their own business, but often we all must start somewhere right? Through the years I’ve built my career on hard work and dedication to making sure my standards and integrity remains high. But there comes a time in life when you’ve got to take that leap of faith and determine to start your own billing or coding business. Isn’t that what the Declaration of Independence says, the rights to Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Let nothing stop you fulfill your dreams, because you’ll face adversity, and negativity, even from your closest colleagues. But keep in mind if you ever decide to start your own business while working for doctor or practice, always be honest and up front, you never know they may believe enough in your dream to partner with you.

    But never forget that America was build on the freedom of enterprise and to exchange ideas, values, and free trade. If you ever need the law to back you up on starting your own business while currently employed. The Law clearly states on the California Business and Professions Code Section 16600, and 16720 – 16728: 16721.

    Recognizing that the California Constitution prohibits a
    person from being disqualified from entering or pursuing a business,
    profession, vocation, or employment because of sex, race, creed,
    color, or national or ethnic origin, and guarantees the free exercise
    and enjoyment of religion without discrimination or preference; and
    recognizing that these and other basic, fundamental constitutional
    principles are directly affected and denigrated by certain ongoing
    practices in the business and commercial world, it is necessary that
    provisions protecting and enhancing a person’s right to enter or
    pursue business and to freely exercise and enjoy religion, consistent
    with law, be established.
    (a) No person within the jurisdiction of this state shall be
    excluded from a business transaction on the basis of a policy
    expressed in any document or writing and imposed by a third party
    where that policy requires discrimination against that person on the
    basis of any characteristic listed or defined in subdivision (b) or
    (e) of Section 51 of the Civil Code or on the basis that the person
    conducts or has conducted business in a particular location.
    (b) No person within the jurisdiction of this state shall require
    another person to be excluded, or be required to exclude another
    person, from a business transaction on the basis of a policy
    expressed in any document or writing that requires discrimination
    against that other person on the basis of any characteristic listed
    or defined in subdivision (b) or (e) of Section 51 of the Civil Code
    or on the basis that the person conducts or has conducted business in
    a particular location.
    (c) Any violation of any provision of this section is a conspiracy
    against trade.
    (d) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit any
    person, on this basis of his or her individual ideology or
    preferences, from doing business or refusing to do business with any
    other person consistent with law.

    16722. Any contract or agreement in violation of this chapter is absolutely void and is not enforceable at law or in equity.

    16725. It is not unlawful to enter into agreements or form associations or combinations, the purpose and effect of which is to promote, encourage or increase competition in any trade or industry, or which are in furtherance of trade.

    Always remember, Honesty is the best policy,

    Sincerely,

    Ernest C. Sari, CPB
    Small Business Entrepreneur

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