Mayo Study Uses Telemedicine to Treat Sport Concussions in Real Time

Mayo Study Uses Telemedicine to Treat Sport Concussions in Real Time

Sports-related concussions are prevalent on the collegiate level, and many times there isn’t sufficient medical personnel, such as concussion specialists, on the sidelines to handle these type of brain injuries.

Enter Telemedicine

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic joined up with the Northern Arizona University football team to conduct a study funded by the Mayo Clinic. The study had concussion specialists using telemedicine technology to determine in real time if a player needed to be removed from play due to head trauma.

For the study, either Bert Vargas, M.D., director of the concussion program at UT Southwestern Medical Center or Amaal Starling, M.D., neurologist and concussion expert at Mayo Clinic performed concussion examinations via a telemedicine robot. There were 123 athletes enrolled in the study, 50 of them participated through two seasons. They evaluated 11 male collegiate football players who suffered suspected concussions over two football seasons.

Vargas said, “During the remote examination, we had the ability to ask additional questions and repeat any portion of the physical evaluation, … The decision as to whether or not the athlete should be removed from play was made by both the athletic trainer and neurologist.”

According to the Mayo Clinic News article, “New study identifies way to treat sports-related concussions using telemedicine:”

Both physicians had high agreement with the evaluation scoring and 100 percent agreement of the most important decision — removal from play. This suggests neurologists may be able to use telemedicine to manage concussions, make removal from play decisions, and close the gaps in medical care by providing all collegiate and youth athletes similar concussion care as professional athletes receive.

Source:

Feasibility and Accuracy of Teleconcussion for Acute Evaluation of Suspected Concussion

 

Michelle Dick
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Michelle Dick

Executive Editor at AAPC
Michelle A. Dick has been executive editor for AAPC for over seven years. Prior to her work at AAPC, she was editor-in-chief at Eli Research and Element K Journals, and disk ad coordinator, web designer/developer, and graphic artist at White Directory Publishers, Inc. Dick has a Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design from the State University of New York - Buffalo State and is a member of the Flower City Professional Coders in Rochester, N.Y.
Michelle Dick
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About Has 164 Posts

Michelle A. Dick has been executive editor for AAPC for over seven years. Prior to her work at AAPC, she was editor-in-chief at Eli Research and Element K Journals, and disk ad coordinator, web designer/developer, and graphic artist at White Directory Publishers, Inc. Dick has a Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design from the State University of New York - Buffalo State and is a member of the Flower City Professional Coders in Rochester, N.Y.

One Response to “Mayo Study Uses Telemedicine to Treat Sport Concussions in Real Time”

  1. Karen Lanoue says:

    Thank you for the brief article on Telemedicine. I recently was made aware of an article stating “New for 2017, the American Medical Association created a CPT modifier” for Telemedicine. I am aware of the “GT” modifier, but was not aware of the new “95” modifier. The article mentions “The new AMA modifier is not applicable for Medicare telemedicine services.” And, mentions “Commercial insurance carrier or other payer” use 95.

    Does anyone have experience billing 99202-99214 CPTs using the 95 modifier? Are commercial claims processing with this modifier?
    Thank you.
    Karen

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