Apple Puts Medical Records in Pockets

Apple Puts Medical Records in Pockets

People board planes by waving their phones. Now your patients will wave their phones when asked about their medical record with a new tool from Apple.

This is the latest in several efforts by government and industry to make medical records portable and universal.  And, it’s the first that would use the smart phone to consolidate patients’ records.

Medical Records in Their Pockets

Apple’s Health app, used on iPhones, will have a Health Records section Apple claims will bring together hospitals, clinics, and the existing application to make it easy for users to see secure medical data from multiple providers wherever they choose.

Using Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), an electronic medical record (EMR) standard, Apple’s new tool provides a one view access to records that include immunizations, lab results, allergies, chronic conditions, medications, vitals, and past procedures. Users will receive notifications of updates to their records.

Medical Records Sources

There are portals available already, such as EPIC’s My Chart, but they are restricted to a single institution that owns the EMR.  The Apple application is designed to pull medical records from any institution or provider associated with the application.

For the time being Apple is conducting a Beta test with the following institutions:

  • Johns Hopkins Medicine – Baltimore, Maryland
  • Cedars-Sinai – Los Angeles, California
  • Penn Medicine – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Geisinger Health System – Danville, Pennsylvania
  • UC San Diego Health – San Diego, California
  • UNC Health Care – Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  • Rush University Medical Center – Chicago, Illinois
  • Dignity Health – Arizona, California and Nevada
  • Ochsner Health System – Jefferson Parish, Louisiana
  • MedStar Health –  Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia
  • OhioHealth – Columbus, Ohio
  • Cerner Healthe Clinic – Kansas City, Missouri

Apple is anxious to work with healthcare providers, and while only those patients of these partners will be able to Beta the application, expect the service to be universal before long.

Brad Ericson

Brad Ericson

Director of Publishing at AAPC
Brad Ericson, MPC, CPC, COSC, has been director of publishing for more than 11 years. Before AAPC he was at Optum for 13 years and Aetna Health Plans prior to that. He has been writing and publishing about healthcare since 1979. He received his Bachelor's in Journalism from Idaho State University and his Master's of Professional Communication degree from Westminster College of Salt Lake City.
Brad Ericson

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About Has 340 Posts

Brad Ericson, MPC, CPC, COSC, has been director of publishing for more than 11 years. Before AAPC he was at Optum for 13 years and Aetna Health Plans prior to that. He has been writing and publishing about healthcare since 1979. He received his Bachelor's in Journalism from Idaho State University and his Master's of Professional Communication degree from Westminster College of Salt Lake City.

3 Responses to “Apple Puts Medical Records in Pockets”

  1. Lisa says:

    What about HIPPA? How can Apple insure privacy on these devices?

  2. Shana says:

    Oh boy, it’s: HIPAA.

  3. Janette Wright says:

    I had the same concerns regarding the privacy and security of PHI

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