Your Input Gives Healthcare Business Monthly Direction

Your Input Gives Healthcare Business Monthly Direction

AAPC’s recent survey tells us what we’re doing right and what we could do better.

In recent months, we asked you to share your thoughts with us about Healthcare Business Monthly (HBM) magazine via an online survey. We appreciate your input. HBM is one of many connections you have with your colleagues and AAPC, and we want it to serve you well.

The magazine, available via mail and electronically on your personal devices, rates as one of your favorite member benefits in other surveys, and this survey confirmed that. More than two-thirds of readers (69 percent) see the magazine as either “extremely” or “very much” a membership benefit. Another quarter see it as a valuable feature of AAPC membership.

Survey Reveals Your HBM Reading Habits

A little under two-thirds (62 percent) read the paper version of the magazine. About 15 percent prefer getting the magazine on their personal electronic devices. And 22 percent are still transitioning, reading the magazine in both formats.

Nearly half (49 percent) read HBM cover to cover; and 42 percent mainly read articles of interest. Many members keep the magazine for future reference or share them with friends and colleagues.

An impressive 35 percent use HBM content to improve their employer’s reimbursement. That says a lot about the credibility of our contributing writers.

These numbers show HBM is fulfilling our mission to provide you with a current, informative, educative, and professional publication.

We also asked what type of content is most useful to you. Coding and billing are, by far, your favorite topics. Articles about compliance and HIPAA, auditing, and practice management aren’t far behind.

The online Test Yourself quiz is very popular. We asked members, “How often do you take the Test Yourself?” To which we learned:

  • 41 percent of you complete it every issue.
  • 40 percent of you complete it a few times a year.
  • 19 percent of you complete it only when renewing your continuing education units (CEUs).

What More Can We Do?

We received a lot of useful feedback in the survey, as well. Although many of you like the magazine the way it is, here are some of the recommended enhancements:

  • More local coverage. Feature states or urban areas, and detail where coders work and what they do.
  • Report on specialty societies. Feature what specialty societies are doing to promote and support medical coding.
  • More code-specific articles. Provide even more details on codes or sections in the CPT®, HCPCS Level II, and ICD-10-CM/PCS, focusing on guidelines, payments, or anything else that might be relevant.
  • More surgery articles. Surgery is a driver of coding and there’s always a need to learn more.
  • More coverage of healthcare changes. These include MACRA, risk adjustment, and new payment models.
  • More electronic health record (EHR) articles. Requests in this area include articles about auditing, managing, and educating providers about electronic record-keeping.
  • Bring back level indications. We used to label articles as “Beginner,” “Intermediate,” and “Expert,” and some readers miss it.
  • Job information. Have recruiters advertise, and publish more articles about job hunting and career advancement.
  • Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs), hospice, and home health. More articles are needed for all three of these topics.
  • Coding examples. Provide more coding examples and case studies.
  • Facility coding. Devote more articles to Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) and Procedural Coding System (PCS) coding.
  • Concentrate on gray issues. Spend more time clearing up gray areas of modifier and evaluation and management (E/M) code use.
  • More tips on utilizing our credentials. What can we do as credentialed members to grow our careers?

We’re looking into these and other suggestions. Success depends on having the space and time to get it into the magazine, finding qualified contributors who can provide this information, and knowing there is a demand for the information.

Take Advantage of Resources Already Available

You can find a lot of what you’re not finding in HBM by going to the Knowledge Center via AAPC’s website or My AAPC. HBM staff researches and posts at least one article each work day about coding, billing, auditing, compliance, and practice management. We cover hierarchical condition categories, MACRA and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System, Medicare changes, and breaking news that affects your day-to-day activities and career. We also archive most HBM articles back to 2008 in the Knowledge Center. Search by term or code to receive a catalog of articles relevant to your search. You can now do your Test Yourself on your personal electronic devices via your My AAPC application.

Most Importantly, We Need Your Help

Michelle Dick; Renee Dustman, AAPC MACRA Proficient; John Verhovshek, MA, CPC; and I are dedicated to giving members the information and experience you deserve, but we can’t do it without your help. The best articles and information come from you. Dig into your brain to see what experience and expertise you pull out, and then contribute an article.

Contact us directly via email. Our names and addresses are on page 6 of HBM, or you can here. In return, you’ll earn CEUs and national recognition of your expertise.

Thank you for reading HBM. We have fun making it.

Brad Ericson

Brad Ericson

Director of Publishing at AAPC
Brad Ericson, MPC, CPC, COSC, has been director of publishing for more than 11 years. Before AAPC he was at Optum for 13 years and Aetna Health Plans prior to that. He has been writing and publishing about healthcare since 1979. He received his Bachelor's in Journalism from Idaho State University and his Master's of Professional Communication degree from Westminster College of Salt Lake City.
Brad Ericson

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About Has 344 Posts

Brad Ericson, MPC, CPC, COSC, has been director of publishing for more than 11 years. Before AAPC he was at Optum for 13 years and Aetna Health Plans prior to that. He has been writing and publishing about healthcare since 1979. He received his Bachelor's in Journalism from Idaho State University and his Master's of Professional Communication degree from Westminster College of Salt Lake City.

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