In Coding
Nov 13th, 2014
Any provider can use the emergency department codes (99281-99285), as long as the service is provided in the ED setting. There is not a requirement for the provider to be assigned to the ED to use these codes. When an ED physician requests another physician to see the patient in the ED, both physicians should ...
In Billing
Dec 6th, 2013
This past summer, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued notice that it was considering a radical change for emergency department (ED) and hospital clinic evaluation and management (E/M) coding. With the release of the 2014 hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment System (ASC PS) final rule, that ...
Sep 1st, 2013
Be sure pediatric ED documentation and coding reflect the demands of your specialty. By Jim Strafford, CEDC, MCS-P Emergency department (ED) coding is place-of-service driven. Coding the five ED levels (99281-99285) and critical care is governed by the American Medical Association’s (AMA) CPT® guidelines, as well as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) ...
Apr 1st, 2013
By Ronda Tews, CPC, CHC, CCS-P Most emergency department (ED) visits are stressful for the patient, but too often they are also stressful for the coder or physician responsible for choosing the evaluation and management (E/M) level to report to the payer. At first glance, choosing a service level shouldn’t be hard: There are only ...
Apr 1st, 2013
By William C. Fiala, MA, CPC, CCS-P, and Nicholas J. Jouriles, MD, FACEP Research and reporting going back nearly two decades suggests that hospital inpatients are increasingly sicker, and their care more complicated. Intuitively, this greater inpatient acuity should result in higher emergency department (ED) evaluation and management (E/M) service levels for those patients admitted ...