Listen to the advice of others before making up your mind. Coders entering the healthcare industry at the turn of the century had it easy: Their only tools of the trade were CPT®, ICD-9, and HCPCS Level II books. Today, coders have options. New technology has many new coders wondering whether they should invest in ...
Rely on coding technology for efficiency, but know your way around a codebook for accuracy. As our lives become more intertwined with technology, so do our jobs. Many of us started with an ICD-9-CM tome, wondering how we’d ever digest its contents. We did it, though, as well as ICD-10 — and some of us ...
Mar 1st, 2013
Both general ophthalmological services (92002-92014) and evaluation and management (E/M) codes (99201-99215) describe office visits for new or established patients. So, when should you apply the ophthalmological services codes rather than the E/M codes? Generally speaking, ophthalmology services codes focus entirely upon the eye. If the provider is strictly evaluating eye function, report an appro...
Jun 1st, 2012
Here’s what to do when your provider’s documentation takes a back seat. By Robyn Margani, CPC If it isn’t documented, it wasn’t done. That’s the golden rule of coding. As we’ve all been told again and again, inaccurate documentation can lead to improper payments, non-compliance with government and insurance regulations, and audit risks. Unfortunately, the ...
In Coding
Dec 10th, 2010
The American Medical Association (AMA) has released the first errata for the 2011 CPT codebooks.  The AMA has compiled a number of changes in a corrections document, dated Nov. 8, which is posted on the AMA website. In this document, you will find changes in the Evaluation and Management (E/M) section, specifically to Prolonged Services codes. ...