Billing time-based services won’t be an endurance race if you have a plan of action and follow the rules. Over the course of two decades, various medical specialties have had to adapt to the “clock game.” Those specialties and their codes now include: Anesthesiology Physical therapy, rehabilitation, chiropractic, occupational therapy Evaluation and management (E/M) services ...
May 1st, 2015
Factor in modifiers, add-on code use, and conversion factors for proper reimbursement. By Amy Crenshaw-Pritchett, CPC, CANPC, CASCC, CEDC, CCS, CMDP, CMPM, ICDCT-CM, ICDCT-PCS, ICDCT-CCC, C-AHI Coding and billing for anesthesia services can be a complicated, even daunting, task. Here are four tips to help you maintain compliance. 1. Know Your Modifiers As a coder or ...
Jan 1st, 2015
Navigate complex state rules and comply with payers’ coverage guidelines and bylaws. By Joette Derricks, MPA, CMPE, CPC, CHC, CSSGB In 2013, the American Medical Association (AMA) established a definition for a qualified healthcare professional (QHP), in terms of which providers may report medical services: “A ‘physician or other qualified health care professional’ is an ...
Apr 1st, 2013
By Marcella Bucknam, CPC, CPC-H, CPC-P, CPC-I, CCC, COBGC, CCS-P, CCS When anesthesiologists work with other qualified anesthesia providers, such as certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA) and anesthesia assistants (AA), they must follow special documentation requirements to be paid for their medical direction of the case. The medical direction rules apply when an anesthesiologist works ...
Feb 1st, 2011
Both new and seasoned coders should know the many risk areas in anesthesia coding By Kelly Dennis, MBA, CPC, CPC-I, CANPC, CHCA, ACS-AN The American Medical Association’s (AMA’s) 2011 CPT® codebook was released without anesthesia-related code changes for this coming year. Because there are no changes to consider, it’s a good time to review both ...