In Coding
Dec 28th, 2018
Lesion excision coding may seem complex, but reporting excision of benign (11400-11471) and malignant (11600-11646) skin lesions can be mastered in five steps. Step 1: Measure First, Cut Second When assigning CPT® codes 11400-11646, you must know both the size of the lesion(s) excised and the width of the margins (the area surrounding the lesion ...
Medical necessity hinges on several factors that must be documented. Looking back on my career of coding audits, investigations, and training bill reviewers, dermatology has always been a hot topic for payers, coders, and providers. To satisfy the documentation and coding challenges this specialty endures, dermatology providers and coders should ask themselves: What is the ...
In CMS
Oct 1st, 2013
To accurately code for skin lesion excision, you need to extract from the documentation the answers to three very important questions: Was the lesion benign or malignant? Where was the lesion located (anatomic site)? What was the excised diameter of the lesion? Let’s examine how these parameters are determined, and how they affect your code ...
In Coding
Aug 12th, 2010
Coding a Mohs procedure can seem like a daunting task at first glance. AAPC member Debra Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H discusses issues related to coding Mohs and shares a number of tips to help improve the overall coding accuracy related to Mohs. This article is not available online but can be found in the July/August issue ...
May 1st, 2010
By G. John Verhovshek, MA, CPC In medicine—and equally so in medical coding—location matters. As such, physician coders must be adept when applying the three modifiers most commonly used to identify more precisely the locations at which a procedure occur: Modifiers 50 Bilateral procedure, LT Left side, and RT Right side. Mirror Image Procedures on ...