Use your job-related pet peeves to initiate better communication in your healthcare organization. Pet peeves are things other people do that annoy you. I’m sure you can think of lots of things your physicians do that get on your nerves. Here’s my top 10 list of a medical coder’s pet peeves, with tips for resolution. ...
Clean out old patient health data so only their current and relevant health factors remain. A problem list should be a database of a patient’s diagnoses. The list should be a way to track and share patient information across specialties and places of service. Unfortunately, problem lists have become repositories for current and inactive concerns. ...
In Coding
May 6th, 2015
Always document and code to the highest specificity of the diagnosis for the services rendered. The ICD-9-CM Manual describes guidelines for outpatient/office visit diagnosis coding, as follows: Diagnosis and procedure codes are to be used at their highest number of digits available (highest degree of certainty) for the encounter/visit; List first the ICD-9-CM code for ...
ICD-10-CM will allow primary care specialists to more accurately depict chronic conditions, as well as other commonly reported diagnoses. Kareo recently interviewed AAPC’s VP of ICD-10 Education and Training, Rhonda Buckholtz, CPC, CPMA, CPC-I, CENTC, CGSC, COBGC, CPEDC, for an article on key diagnoses to which primary care specialists should pay particular attention, after ICD-10 ...
Oct 1st, 2012
By Wendy Grant, CPC There is no quick way to code an operative (op) report. You must read and reread—think dissection—to be sure your coding reflects all the procedures and diagnoses performed. Code from the Body of the Report To code only the “preoperative diagnosis, postoperative diagnosis, and operation performed,” listed at the beginning of ...