Since the 2014 federal mandate for providers to adopt electronic health records (EHRs), almost all healthcare organizations have made the switch over from paper medical records. With good intentions of better healthcare data capture and easier record sharing and portability, the EHR transition unfortunately opened a new list of problems. The good news is EHR technology ...
In Audit
Mar 14th, 2018
Although electronic health records (EHRs) weren’t originally designed with litigation in mind, it’s good to know how you can make them more usable as testimony in your defense. Consider how your EHR information will influence litigation and how it will be produced if sequestered. Differences of EHRs and Paper Charts in Litigation The way EHR ...
Mar 30th, 2017
Since electronic medical records (EMR) have become prevalent, there has been concern whether documentation in the patient record accurately reflects medical necessity and the services provided. When I started working in the healthcare setting, we always told providers, “Not documented, not done.” Now, when I review a chart note, the question I have to ask ...
A little preventive maintenance will ensure your physicians are capturing accurate documentation. Electronic health records (EHRs) can make documentation and billing processes easier, but some EHR features can leave your practice vulnerable in ways the vendor may not have explained. In the time it takes to drink a cup of coffee, you can perform some ...
In Audit
Sep 15th, 2015
by John Verhovshek, MA, CPC Electronic medical records have simplified documentation and record tracking. In some cases, the electronic record allows the physician to bring forward, or to “cut-and paste,” previous patient information. Although this may save time, progress notes are critical to support medical necessity. For example, if an inpatient’s improvement and/or regression is not ...