In Coding
Sep 6th, 2017
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released “ICD-10-CM Coding Advice for Healthcare Encounters in Hurricane Aftermath” as a guide when coding healthcare encounters for individuals injured by a hurricane. The document reviews the use of external cause of morbidity codes, which “should be assigned to identify the cause of the injury(ies) incurred as a result ...
In Coding
May 1st, 2014
Use them to report in enhanced detail and possibly streamline claims submission and payment adjudication. By Evan M. Gwilliam, DC, MBA, CPC, CCPC, CPC-I, CCCPC, CPMA, NCICS, MCS-P At some point in the near future, all claims for healthcare services in the United States will have to use ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes. ICD-9-CM has been the standard ...
From the general media coverage of ICD-10 implementation, it would appear coders will be spending an overwhelming amount of time after October 1 trying to code scenarios such as whether a patient was injured by contact with a dolphin (W56.0-), sea lion (W56.1-), orca (W56.2-), or other marine mammal (W56.3-). However, unless coders are already ...
In Coding
May 23rd, 2013
By Betty Hovey, BA, CPC, CPC-I, CPC-H, CPCD, CCS-P, PCS, CCP, CIC, RMC On May 17, 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released several important clarifications in their ICD-10 Industry Update email. There has been some confusion and frustration regarding the codes in Chapter 20, External Causes of Morbidity (V, W, X, ...
Nov 28th, 2012
The purpose of external cause codes is to provide data for injury research and evaluation of injury prevention strategies. AAPC’s Vice President of ICD-10 Education and Training Rhonda Buckholtz, CPC, CPMA, CPC-I, CGSC, COBGC, CPEDC, CENTC, recently authored an article for HCPro in which she describes why ICD-10 seems to have a code for everything, ...