When you’re told as a teen by a teacher that a small physical deformity will prevent you from doing something you love, it makes you reassess the direction you were headed. For example, something as simple as a bunion prevented me from taking pointe ballet. I still studied ballet into early adulthood, but pointe was ...
Aug 22nd, 2016
Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to other conditions, such as diabetic peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and the resulting loss of protective sensation (LOPS). Routine foot care (cutting, clipping or debriding toenails, for example) is generally non-covered under Medicare, but may be covered for beneficiaries who are diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy because ...
Sep 1st, 2013
Learn confusing eponyms and techniques to help make coding easier. By Heidi Stout, CPC, COSC, CCS-P Coding surgical procedures to correct bunion and hallux valgus deformities can be intimidating. With a wide variety of surgical techniques that are referenced using an eponym (proper name), choosing the correct codes can be challenging, even for seasoned orthopaedic ...
Mar 1st, 2013
Knowing anatomy and procedure differences will clarify coding and save you from embarrassing misconception. By Maryann C. Palmeter, CPC, CENTC I recall reviewing some documentation where a patient had a foot amputated, and about two months later the same patient underwent an amputation of the same foot. I thought, “How many times can the same ...
Oct 23rd, 2009
By David J. Freedman, DPM, FASPS, CPC While reviewing records for submission, I often see coding and billing errors in foot, ankle, and lower leg claims. Bypassing the following seven common foot and ankle mistakes and using certain tips for ensuring successful coding will help you collect what your practice is entitled to. Give Unsupported ...