When doctors describe lumps and bumps inconsistently, look to the definitive diagnosis for clarity. Coding lesions, masses, and tumors can be tricky because some providers use these three terms interchangeably in the same operative note. By the time youve finished reading the note, you don’t know what type of lump or bump you’re coding. That’s ...
In Coding
Apr 21st, 2019
To select an appropriate code for excision of a benign (11400-11471) or malignant (11600-11646) skin lesion, you must determine the lesion’s diameter at its widest point, and add double the width of the narrowest margin (the portion of healthy tissue around the lesion also excised). In the interest of both clinical and coding accuracy, providers should ...
Oct 1st, 2012
By Wendy Grant, CPC There is no quick way to code an operative (op) report. You must read and reread—think dissection—to be sure your coding reflects all the procedures and diagnoses performed. Code from the Body of the Report To code only the “preoperative diagnosis, postoperative diagnosis, and operation performed,” listed at the beginning of ...
In Billing
Jan 20th, 2009
On Jan. 6 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed a national coverage determination (NCD) broadening initial diagnostic testing with positron emission tomography (PET) scans for many Medicare beneficiaries’ cancer treatment. Comment on CMS PET Scan Expansion was last modified: July 5th, 2011 by admin aapc...
Jan 1st, 2009
By Jennifer Swindle, CPC, CEMC, CFPC, RHIT, CCS-P, CCP-P There are many minor skin procedures performed in the medical office. It’s critical for coders and physicians to communicate effectively so documentation is clear and concise, coding is accurate, and reimbursement is appropriate. Biopsies, excisions of both benign and malignant lesions, destruction of pre-malignant and benign ...