In Coding
Jul 29th, 2015
By Brenda Edwards, CPC,CPB, CPMA, CPC-I, CEMC, CRC To code an excision, or an incision and drainage (I&D)? That seems to be an age-old question. Examination of the suspected problem could identify an abscess, cyst, hematoma or seroma. Understanding the differences in these fluid filled pockets is imperative to code accurately. An abscess is filled ...
In Billing
Nov 28th, 2012
Your surgeon has excised three skin lesions from the patient’s left shoulder, and now must close the wounds. Should you report both the excisions and repairs? If so, which is primary? CPT® guidelines instruct that all benign (11400-11471) or malignant (11600-11646) skin lesion codes include simple wound closure, but you may separately report intermediate (12031-12057) ...
Jun 1st, 2012
Fight for your right to be paid for properly documented claims. By G.J. Verhovshek When commenting on Abraham Morse’s, MD, MBA, article “Same-day E/M and Office Procedure: Yes, You Can!” (March 2012 Coding Edge, pages 16-17), several readers shared that insurers (including Medicare contractors) routinely deny evaluation and management (E/M) claims when reported with other ...
Apr 1st, 2010
By Trina Cuppett, CPC, CPC-H and G. John Verhovshek, MA, CPC Coding skin neoplasm diagnoses and excisions requires careful attention to detail. The key to accurate reporting is knowing the sort of detail to look for and where to find it. The following basic guidelines will set you on the right path. Diagnosis Reporting: Let ...
May 1st, 2008
by Sheri Poe Bernard, CPC, CPC-H, CPC-P CPT® and ICD-9-CM code selection for lacerations and their repair is a simple task if you break down coding criteria into simple components. Length, Location, and Type For CPT®, integumentary repair codes specify length, location and type of wound repair. Codes are selected by: Laceration length in centimeters ...