ICD-10 if you don't pass the exam will you lose the Certifcation??

hinditina

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I have been trying to find out the answer to this questions. I know we have a two year peroid to try to pass the ICD-10 exam for those who are already certifcation, but if you don't pass (some people wait till the last minute) will you lose you certification?
 

amjordan

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The answer to your question can be found here http://www.aapc.com/ICD-10/training.aspx. It is broken down by year and this can be found at the end.

2014:

September 30, Proficiency Validation Ends
Proficiency tests will be taken online within the AAPC Member Area. The exam will be composed of 75 questions, timed and open book. All certified coders are required to pass the exam by September 30, 2014 to maintain certification. The exam may be taken twice for $60.​
 

Willingham

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will you be able to keep your certification?

I have been trying to find out the answer to this questions. I know we have a two year peroid to try to pass the ICD-10 exam for those who are already certifcation, but if you don't pass (some people wait till the last minute) will you lose you certification?
The answer is no you will not be able to keep your certification if you have not passed the proficiency test w/in the 2yrs AAPC is going to give us, I called them today
 

Anna Weaver

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exam

I will be extremely pissed off if I lose my certification by not passing this new ICD-10 thing. I busted my butt, and paid entirely too much money, to pass the exam and earn the certificate I have now. I just paid another $120 to keep my certification up to date, and I can't even use it. I refuse to give this organization any more money when the certificate has proved useless for so many of us.
I'm really sorry you feel so negatively about the choice you made to certify in coding. I can only say that there may be a lot of the newer coders, and maybe some older ones, who are having difficulty finding jobs, but there are many, many of us working and we do enjoy our careers.
Unfortunately, you do hear a lot about the negative side of certification on here, that's what it's for, to be able to gain advice from those who have gone before. I don't feel we hear enough about the good things that happen though, so it's off-set by negativity. With over 50,000 certified (I believe that was the last number?) you figure the relatively few who are unhappy, that leaves a whole lot of people who are satisfied (if not happy) with their career choice. Make no mistake, there are days when I would say I would give it up in a heart beat, but I wouldn't because I really enjoy the research, the give and take, even the arguing (just to see if I can be right!!!).
The ICD-10 will be just another hurdle/challenge to keep us on our toes. We have to keep our certification up, which means more education constantly, which is why AAPC is one of the leading credentialing sources in the United States. I, for one, do enjoy learning anything new.
So, having said this, just want to let you know, there is always another side. Please don't give up if this is what you want to do. And as the saying goes, anything worth having is worth fighting for! So, if this is truly your career choice, keep fighting!
Best of luck to you!
 

ghejnal

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Change is inevitable

Hi to all,

I agree with you, Anna. I've been on both sides: a coder who was certified without a job (numerous times), and now an employed coder working for the VA. I know the heartache and the discipline that goes into coding and I also know the money that it takes to continue the education. At times, it is tedious and exhausting, but it has many rewards.

I encourage you, Ashley, to continue to keep your head up. With ICD-10 coming, one of the benefits is that it is NEW for ALL OF US. Where some seasoned coders have excelled in their coding of ICD-9, you may have an opportunity to shine because we're all going to be novices with new information. My approach will be to learn as much as possible through my employer, research online as much as I can for free, go to my chapter meetings to learn from those around me, network with other coders, and read, read, read...

One thing that enticed me with the coding field in general was the fact that it changes constantly. The AAPC is doing everything it can to inform us, and I have to believe that the membership fee I submit every year is helping to teach me something. They have tried to keep costs low, which I appreciate. We are all living through a national recession and though some of us have jobs and others of us don't, the academy is trying to help with education. I'll pray about your job search. :)
 

bevan

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To ensure that employers continue to value the CPC® and other AAPC credentials once ICD-10-CM is implemented (thus protecting all 60,000 credential holders), and that those credentials truly represent one’s ability to code under the current code set, AAPC members holding a credential will have two years to pass an open-book, online ICD-10 proficiency test.

* You will be given two (2) years to take and pass, beginning October 1, 2012 (one year before implementation of ICD-10) and ending September 30, 2014 (one year after implementation)
* There will be 75 questions
* It will be open-book, online and un-proctored
* Coders will have two (2) attempts at passing for the $60 administration fee
 

KimmieG

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Ashley must live in a rural area as I do

Keep looking Ashley, I live in a very rural area and there aren't any certified coders here, not even at the hospital. I have to travel over an hour to the most local chapter. Chin up and keep looking!
 

Ezara

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I agree with both sides on this one. I paid for all of my exams and books to start with and was really disgusted with the cost of it all. Unfortunately the only thing constant in this field is change. I guess thats why I like it so much. Good luck to us all.
 
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I have been appalled at the AAPC's decision to require us to take a test to maintain our credentials and have written Terry Leone (with no response). Today I decided to email Reed Pew to see if he would be able to respond to my email. I have not heard of a credentialing body that threatens to take away your certification for failing to receive updated information (ICD-10). Isn't this the reason we are required to maintian CEU's each year. My suggestion is to make attending ICD-10 seminars a requirement for CEU's each year...not to pass a $60 test that could cost us our licensure and loss of AAPC members.
 

Tstanko50

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I will be extremely pissed off if I lose my certification by not passing this new ICD-10 thing. I busted my butt, and paid entirely too much money, to pass the exam and earn the certificate I have now. I just paid another $120 to keep my certification up to date, and I can't even use it. I refuse to give this organization any more money when the certificate has proved useless for so many of us.

Yes I can see how you feel I too spent alot of money on this class and regret not taking the cpc class through the aapc instead i took throgh a distance learning and didnt get much bang for my buck I got a diploma I finished the class but I still had to spend for practice tests and you know study guides any way i just took my cpc exam and if i dont pass the test the second time because i dont feel i did very well this first one I will have to pay my employer back what they paid for me to take the test and the one yr membership as well.. I am determined to pass and this is my career goal so I will not give up. I will be the only certified coder in our billing dept of 4
Its not needed for me to keep my current job but later on down the road I know it will come in useful So keep your chin up and check all the doc offices in your area because I dont think all have to be certified to do actual coding work My job in billing is multitasking along with coding we are 4 people (who could use a 5th ) doing everything checking invoices for coding errors posting insurance payments helping patients with their bills sending claims to clearing house appeals insurance ar enter hosp charges for half of the docs.. and maybe because of all that software that is out there that does the coding for the doctor But the claims still need to be checked before they are sent All I am saying is that working in a doc office is more then coding and there might be an office out there looking for someone who is willing to learn and you are certified so that is a plus good luck to you and if you want to email me you can cuetweety38@yahoo.com
also insurance companies im told will hire coders for auditing and claims resolution specialist for UHC and Aetna I know for a fact they hire to work at home too so good luck to you Tracey
 
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OCD_coder

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ICD-10 Test

We, as coders, hold a higher standard than anyone else. Yes, we pay a lot of money for our certification. Nothing worthwhile is free. We have a standard of ethics that must be maintained and another test is required to prove to those that rely on our knowledge to keep our billing practices compliant. We are only going to become more valuable as the new EMR requirements from the government, the RAC and the ICD-10 is implemented. The AAPC has twice as many members as AHIMA does, that says that the AAPC holds the standard. If we are to maintain any credibility and maintain our continued progression to gain acceptance within the medical community our standards must reflect this.

Yes, I don't really want to take another test. But I also do not want to sit next to someone anywhere, anytime that does not know how to use the new ICD-10. It will reflect on us as a national group when someone does not know what they are doing. So with that all said, it is imperitive that we all take a ceritfication test to become ICD-10 certified.

It will be open book, it will be a challenge, but it won't be impossible if you know what you are doing and they is the key. We all must know what we are doing and be able to prove it. One bad egg makes it more difficult to get the respect we need to do our jobs properly.
 

mmorningstarcpc

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With respect to other posters comments, I personally think testing proficiency in ICD-10 is a good thing. The cost is no more really than your CEUs may cost. I love a challenge and learning new things. I have been learing about ICD-10 for several years, both the diagnosis coding, and the procedures. There are lots of resources out there, including AAPC, of which many are free or low cost. I think ICD-10, like most other things, can be what you make of it. If you are interested in learning about it, you may find it easier to learn; if you don't want it and find it "just another burden" than most likely it will be harder for you to grasp. Make the best of it!

PS, Who knows, if you complete the ICD-10 proficiency early, it may give you a leg up on someone else who hasn't tested yet.:cool:
 

todd5400

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Since we have a 2 year period to pass why can't we take the test more than twice if need be in that 2 year period? And...........if we don't pass and loose our certification we have to start all over??? I for one have only coded for 20 years within one specialty. Why would I want to study again and test on all the sections which I have never used!

Mary,CPC
 

ReedPew

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can you take ICD-10 proficiency test more than twice?

yes, $60 enables you to take twice. Another $60 will enable another two test. I genuinely hope no one has to pitch in another $60. Its online, unproctored and open book. With reasonable preparation, this will be very passable.
 

ARCPC9491

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I don't understand what all the hype is all about ICD-10. I want to take the test. Why wouldn't you?

As coders, we are the go-to, the ones who know some pretty important stuff. Think about it, if coders/billers DID NOT exist, would your practice fail? Yes, it would. Each and everyone of you has a very important role. So remember that. Important roles have important duties,#1: maintaining your CPC and other credentials. Maintaining your credentials, means abiding by the organizations requirements. Think of it as your driver's license. Every 10 years or whatever you have to retake the test, if you don't, they take away your license. Well, now the same goes for ICD-10. ICD-10 is a massive change, as well as a headache, but we are in this business because we love what we do. If you don't, then you don't belong here. Do you think your physicians would be happy when ICD-10 takes place, and you don't know what you are doing? Nope probably not. Taking this test is not about just the credential holder...it affects your doctors, your patients, the rest of the staff, and pretty importantly, your revenue.

There are costs and fees associated with everything you do in life. I think the AAPC's costs are reasonable and competitive. Some of our employers pay for our CEU's and membership fees, for which we are thankful for. For those employers that don't, have you ever asked? Make a deal, ask them to pay half of all expenses. Bargain with them. If your employer requires the CPC, make them pay for the CEU's.

Just my opinion.
 

kbarron

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I tried to take a course for the ICD 10 and was told by my director that I didn't need to have it as there will be many changes before it takes place. My hospital used to pay for all my training and license but now they don't pay for anything. I comes out of my pocket.
 

mitchellde

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I don't understand what all the hype is all about ICD-10. I want to take the test. Why wouldn't you?

As coders, we are the go-to, the ones who know some pretty important stuff. Think about it, if coders/billers DID NOT exist, would your practice fail? Yes, it would. Each and everyone of you has a very important role. So remember that. Important roles have important duties,#1: maintaining your CPC and other credentials. Maintaining your credentials, means abiding by the organizations requirements. Think of it as your driver's license. Every 10 years or whatever you have to retake the test, if you don't, they take away your license. Well, now the same goes for ICD-10. ICD-10 is a massive change, as well as a headache, but we are in this business because we love what we do. If you don't, then you don't belong here. Do you think your physicians would be happy when ICD-10 takes place, and you don't know what you are doing? Nope probably not. Taking this test is not about just the credential holder...it affects your doctors, your patients, the rest of the staff, and pretty importantly, your revenue.

There are costs and fees associated with everything you do in life. I think the AAPC's costs are reasonable and competitive. Some of our employers pay for our CEU's and membership fees, for which we are thankful for. For those employers that don't, have you ever asked? Make a deal, ask them to pay half of all expenses. Bargain with them. If your employer requires the CPC, make them pay for the CEU's.

Just my opinion.
ABSOLUTELY! DITTO! You said it all. thank you!
 
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I have never heard of having to re-take your drivers exam to maintain your license. Is that a state-specific requirement?

I hold 3 credentials total and have never had to re-take a test to maintain my status. If there is an update to any procedure, we are required to attend seminars and submit those with our CEU's. For those that "want" to take the test, you are an anomaly, but if you like test, I have some college coursework testing that I can send you to do. LOL.
 

hergett

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Cpc-h

?? Does this apply to all that have there cpc or does it apply to cpc-h as well ,
thanks
th
 

NIENAJADLY

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cpc, cpc-h

My understanding is that it applies to any certification you have (CPC, CPC-H, CPC-P, etc). If you hold a certification, you'll need to recertify for ICD-10.

Kellie
 

hergett

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Cpc-h

Thank you kelly

i was told a few different things so thanks for clearing that up for me
:)
 

hthompson

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What if you get specialty credentials, like CFP or CPC/E/M or however they're coming? Should I wait til ICD-10 to get those credentials or will it ONLY be the CPC credentials?
 

twtcpc

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My two cents worth on this topic

Personally, I don't see what all of the hype is about either. Doctors and others in the medical profession have to take exams every so often for their licensure to prove that they are up to date on new advances in the field, so I don't see why it shouldn't be expected of us. I have met/worked with some CPCs out there that I wondered how in the world they became credentialed in the first place and others who are not credentialed who could code the socks off of some of us! I worked very hard for my credentials and having two years to take the ICD-10 exam with an open book should not be anything that I can't handle. The only people who might want to worry are the ones who probably shouldn't be credentialed or those who wait until the last minute to try to take it the first time.
 
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AMEN Machelle! I couldn't have said it better myself... thanks for you post :)


With respect to other posters comments, I personally think testing proficiency in ICD-10 is a good thing. The cost is no more really than your CEUs may cost. I love a challenge and learning new things. I have been learing about ICD-10 for several years, both the diagnosis coding, and the procedures. There are lots of resources out there, including AAPC, of which many are free or low cost. I think ICD-10, like most other things, can be what you make of it. If you are interested in learning about it, you may find it easier to learn; if you don't want it and find it "just another burden" than most likely it will be harder for you to grasp. Make the best of it!

PS, Who knows, if you complete the ICD-10 proficiency early, it may give you a leg up on someone else who hasn't tested yet.:cool:
 
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I don't understand what all the hype is all about ICD-10. I want to take the test. Why wouldn't you?

As coders, we are the go-to, the ones who know some pretty important stuff. Think about it, if coders/billers DID NOT exist, would your practice fail? Yes, it would. Each and everyone of you has a very important role. So remember that. Important roles have important duties,#1: maintaining your CPC and other credentials. Maintaining your credentials, means abiding by the organizations requirements. Think of it as your driver's license. Every 10 years or whatever you have to retake the test, if you don't, they take away your license. Well, now the same goes for ICD-10. ICD-10 is a massive change, as well as a headache, but we are in this business because we love what we do. If you don't, then you don't belong here. Do you think your physicians would be happy when ICD-10 takes place, and you don't know what you are doing? Nope probably not. Taking this test is not about just the credential holder...it affects your doctors, your patients, the rest of the staff, and pretty importantly, your revenue.

There are costs and fees associated with everything you do in life. I think the AAPC's costs are reasonable and competitive. Some of our employers pay for our CEU's and membership fees, for which we are thankful for. For those employers that don't, have you ever asked? Make a deal, ask them to pay half of all expenses. Bargain with them. If your employer requires the CPC, make them pay for the CEU's.

Just my opinion.

HERE HERE!!!! I completely agree with you. I am thrilled and proud to be a coder and part of an elite group, why wouldn't any of you feel the same? We have worked hard to obtain the status we have, be proud and be ready to learn more (that's what being a coder is all about), even if that means taking another test. They are giving us a break to have it open book and unproctored... be thankful..... my 2 cents ;)
 

rthames052006

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashleynapier
I will be extremely pissed off if I lose my certification by not passing this new ICD-10 thing. I busted my butt, and paid entirely too much money, to pass the exam and earn the certificate I have now. I just paid another $120 to keep my certification up to date, and I can't even use it. I refuse to give this organization any more money when the certificate has proved useless for so many of us.

I on the other hand am looking forward to taking the ICD-10 challenge, It's another chance to prove myself as a CPC and prove that I am up to date on things in the coding world. With this profession the only thing your guaranteed is change. Keeping your certification up to date is your responsibility in my opinion.

I do hiring in my position and I sure would want a candidate that is up to date with things and who isn't so negative about having to keep up their certification. I too pay for my certification, seminars etc... I wouldn't have it any other way. I don't want or need my employer to pay for me, Yes I am helping them out too but I do it for myself not per se for them.

Just my two cents.
 
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I'm really sorry you feel so negatively about the choice you made to certify in coding. I can only say that there may be a lot of the newer coders, and maybe some older ones, who are having difficulty finding jobs, but there are many, many of us working and we do enjoy our careers.
Unfortunately, you do hear a lot about the negative side of certification on here, that's what it's for, to be able to gain advice from those who have gone before. I don't feel we hear enough about the good things that happen though, so it's off-set by negativity. With over 50,000 certified (I believe that was the last number?) you figure the relatively few who are unhappy, that leaves a whole lot of people who are satisfied (if not happy) with their career choice. Make no mistake, there are days when I would say I would give it up in a heart beat, but I wouldn't because I really enjoy the research, the give and take, even the arguing (just to see if I can be right!!!).
The ICD-10 will be just another hurdle/challenge to keep us on our toes. We have to keep our certification up, which means more education constantly, which is why AAPC is one of the leading credentialing sources in the United States. I, for one, do enjoy learning anything new.
So, having said this, just want to let you know, there is always another side. Please don't give up if this is what you want to do. And as the saying goes, anything worth having is worth fighting for! So, if this is truly your career choice, keep fighting!
Best of luck to you!
Seems everybody is to be happy if they have a job. Those who have a job almost look down on those who don't and don't want to give any advice or help. Believe it or not there are more than a "few" who are unhappy! My friend's area unemployment rate is 17% with many coders out of work. Further you have as many schools as are in business turning out 20-30 coders monthly. Many jobs require 3 years experience just to get in the door! Are these not so few supposed to be happy?
 

Anna Weaver

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Icd-10

Seems everybody is to be happy if they have a job. Those who have a job almost look down on those who don't and don't want to give any advice or help. Believe it or not there are more than a "few" who are unhappy! My friend's area unemployment rate is 17% with many coders out of work. Further you have as many schools as are in business turning out 20-30 coders monthly. Many jobs require 3 years experience just to get in the door! Are these not so few supposed to be happy?
Well, I would say anyone who is working right now probably is happy they have a job. I don't know of anyone who looks down on anyone who isn't working. With things the way they are, any of us could be among those unemployed. The only advice I can give, is to take anything that will get you in the door, sell yourself, have good work ethics, play down negativity, and show what your made of. That will get you farther in work than anything else. I do understand there are a lot of coders out there (and more coming) without work. Unfortunately, I am not in a position to help them, except to network, mentor, and give support as much as possible. I'm not in a position to hire or even recommend for employment. Our facility isn't hiring right now either. I really am sorry there are so many unemployed coders. But, as with any up and coming career (coding has grown almost triple in the past 5 years) you have to expect lags in employment.
Anyway, Best of luck to you!
 

pharmon

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I do not look down on any coder not employed. It's a struggle, and I sympathize and understand it truly is a hard field to break into. I've been there. I had to work M-F, 8am to 5pm for two years and attend college at night. I had no life to speak of, except books in my hand. I also was on the insurance side of coding before becoming a coder and being offered the opportunity to work in a specialty field to gain my experience was an answer to prayers. We've all started from the bottom and from opportunities that crossed our paths. I encourage those unemployed to step into a field closely related to coding (i.e. insurance). Especially if you have no medical experience and trying to get into the field of coding. However, I know several elders in the field that will not transition into Icd-10, which will open lots of doors with companies when that takes place.
 

denisek

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Denise

I agree that we need to be ICD-10 proficient,we would be foolish not to be for our current jobs. I think this could be achieved by requiring CEU's to be coding ICD-10. Also, the training that is offered by AAPC is expensive considering we pay $125.00 a year in dues to keep our membership. I'm not against taking the test but we should get a second certification in ICD-10 not lose the original one we earned. We coded the CPT codes as well and it was one of the hardest test I have ever taken , including the 1 year course in coding I took at the community college at a cost of $2500.00. It seems a little small for AAPC to say that they will take this achievement away if you don't pass this test. I think they should rethink this decision.
 

nyyankees

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I agree that we need to be ICD-10 proficient,we would be foolish not to be for our current jobs. I think this could be achieved by requiring CEU's to be coding ICD-10. Also, the training that is offered by AAPC is expensive considering we pay $125.00 a year in dues to keep our membership. I'm not against taking the test but we should get a second certification in ICD-10 not lose the original one we earned. We coded the CPT codes as well and it was one of the hardest test I have ever taken , including the 1 year course in coding I took at the community college at a cost of $2500.00. It seems a little small for AAPC to say that they will take this achievement away if you don't pass this test. I think they should rethink this decision.
Good point. Maybe AAPC should rethink this..
 

maddismom

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Truly, who would want to hire someone who is no longer proficient in diagnosis coding but can code procedures? I'm thinking not many. It is appropriate that you will lose your certification if you don't pass the test.
 

rascal24k

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I have just graduated with AIU online in December 2012. I was not told when I graduated I would not be certified. I got my associates degree in the mean time but now I have to take they exam for certification. This is my second attempt and this really is a kick your butt test for the CPC. I have not found a job in coding yet but I wish and hope to get into. I will be getting some more education on the ICD-10 but I need to no what and if there are any programs where you can get help to pay for these courses I am on a budget.
 

mitzekelley

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We have until 2015...

Read below...it says that we have until September of 2015 (not 2014) to take the test.....

What is the ICD-10 Proficiency Assessment and is it required? The ICD-10 Proficiency Assessment is the only step of this roadmap required for all certified AAPC members. You should prepare yourself as you would for other exams or assessments. To ensure employers continue to have confidence in a certified coder's ability to accurately code the current code sets, AAPC certified members will have two years to pass an open-book, online, unproctored assessment.
It will measure your understanding of ICD-10-CM format and structure, groupings and categories of codes, ICD-10-CM official guidelines, and coding concepts.
•Required for AAPC certified coders, recommended for all other coders•Two (2) years to take and pass the assessment, beginning October 1, 2013 (one year before implementation of ICD-10) and ending September 30, 2015 (one year after implementation)•75 questions, open-book, online, and unproctored•Coders will have two (2) attempts at passing for the $60 administration fee•ICD-10-CM only (ICD-10-PCS will not be covered in the assessment)•No CEUs given
 
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reply to threads....

Thanks after reading these threads I didn't have to ask an repetitive question again... however this AACPC site is for what use cause I am not understanding yet how do I get to study for up coming test for the CPC? :confused:
 

mitchellde

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Thanks after reading these threads I didn't have to ask an repetitive question again... however this AACPC site is for what use cause I am not understanding yet how do I get to study for up coming test for the CPC? :confused:
You can purchase the study guide which is excellent and I highly recommend it. Also you have your code books which you can read through. You can read through the various forums for more insite. There are many ways to study, also your local chapter should be of assistance to you, many chapters have study sessions they sponsor.
 
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