Is the sheath left in place the same as a catheter? 50432 pr 50432-52

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Hello,
I need some clarification please! The doctor left a sheath behind in a procedure where it's usually a catheter. ((Wording in 50432 states catheter)
Is this sheath the same thing as a catheter? Thanks!

PERCUTANEOUS ANTEGRADE NEPHROURETERAL WIRE PLACEMENT
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HISTORY:
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Renal calculus with prior nephrostomy placement. Planned retrograde ureteroscopy.
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TECHNIQUE:
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Risks and benefits of the procedure were discussed with the patient and informed consent was obtained. The patient was placed prone on the angiographic table and a scout radiograph was obtained. The right flank and existing catheter were prepped and draped in the usual sterile fashion. Moderate sedation was begun and 2% lidocaine was admitted for local anesthesia.
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The existing catheter was detached at the hub. Multiple attempts were made to uncoil this catheter utilizing a combination of wires. After some difficulty, the catheter was removed over a Glidewire. A 5-French Berenstein catheter was placed over the wire. Contrast was injected and a limited antegrade nephrostogram was obtained. Several attempts were made to access the renal pelvis utilizing a combination of catheters and wires. These were unsuccessful, and at least one wire pass was made outside of the collecting system with contrast injected into the perinephric space. Since satisfactory wire placement could not be obtained via the existing access, the access was abandoned.
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An interpolar calyx was then accessed under fluoroscopic guidance utilizing a 21-gauge needle. A 0.018 inch wire was advanced into the renal pelvis, over which an AccuStick device was placed. Contrast was injected to confirm positioning. A 0.035 inch Glidewire was then advanced into the renal pelvis over which a 6-French vascular sheath was placed. A combination of wires and catheters were used coaxially to advance into the bladder. Contrast was injected to confirm positioning within the bladder. The wire was exchanged for an Amplatz wire which was left coiled in the bladder. The catheter was removed and the sheath was left in place. The sheath was secured to the skin with a single 2-0 Ethilon suture. The catheter and wire were then secured to the skin in a sterile fashion. Postprocedure radiograph was obtained. The patient was transferred to the preoperative unit in stable condition.
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FINDINGS:
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Scout radiograph reveals apparent significant interval retraction of the existing catheter. Multiple attempts to uncoil and replace this catheter were unsuccessful due to retraction into a small lower pole calyx. Additionally, central wire placement was unable to be obtained via this access. This appeared to be due to a combination of a tortuous and difficult angle as well as infundibular stenosis at the proximal aspect of the calyx. On at least one occasion, the wire exited outside of the renal collecting system resulting in extravasation of contrast. Given the degree of complication from this access, the decision was made to establish a more favorable access via a larger calyx.
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Access was reestablished via an interpolar calyx. After multiple attempts utilizing angled tip and straight catheters, access was established to the bladder. A 0.035 inch Amplatz wire was left coiled in the bladder with a large portion external. Additionally, a 6-French vascular sheath was left with the tip terminating in the renal pelvis as a safety access or for purposes of antegrade nephrostogram as needed. This can be removed at the completion of any retrograde procedure if antegrade access is no longer required.
 
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