Newbie for 2023 Conference with Questions

Melissasuewashburn

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So I am finally looking at being able to attend a conference since Nashville is basically in my backyard, however I have a couple of questions.

First, how necessary is it to stay on site? I was pricing rooms and the cost of the rooms almost make the conference out of my budget.

Second, are any meals included or do we have to provide all of our own meals? This obviously impacts the overall cost.

Third, I have mobility issues - can walk shorter distances with a walker but for longer distances would need to rent a mobility scooter. Would it be recommended to have the scooter over the walker?

I am so excited to finally be able to attend but want to make sure I am budgeting for everything necessary so I don't come up short. I know pricing on things like food and rooms will change between now and then but if I can get a good general idea of cost and then add an additional amount for padding I should be fine.

Thanks for answering a newbies questions.
 

Pam Brooks

True Blue
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You don't need to stay on site. Many local attendees drive in every day.
Some meals are included. The agenda (when it's published) will outline the schedule and indicate when a meal is provided. Generally breakfast and lunch are included most days. Dinner is on your own.
A mobility scooter would be a better alternative than a walker. There is a lot of walking involved, and the hotel is fully handicapped accessible. There is sometimes a line at the elevator, because a lot of people can't do stairs.

I hope you have a wonderful time.
 

Melissasuewashburn

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You don't need to stay on site. Many local attendees drive in every day.
Some meals are included. The agenda (when it's published) will outline the schedule and indicate when a meal is provided. Generally breakfast and lunch are included most days. Dinner is on your own.
A mobility scooter would be a better alternative than a walker. There is a lot of walking involved, and the hotel is fully handicapped accessible. There is sometimes a line at the elevator, because a lot of people can't do stairs.

I hope you have a wonderful time.
Thank you so much. I did confirm with AAPC and are definitely covering lunches but have not yet decided on breakfast.

Your opinion on scooter over walker reenforces my personal thoughts, however because I don't currently own one and would have to rent it the cost definitely needs to be factored in which is why I was hoping to get someones opinion.

You have definitely helped this newbie!
 

Melissasuewashburn

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Is there a block of rooms for Healthcon 2023?
I don't think they have released this information yet, however unless they give a pretty significant discount the rooms are going to be close to $300 a night if you are not sharing a room. I am personally staying at the Inn at Opryland, A Gaylord Hotel - it's right across the street (can walk to convention center if you want to, supposedly they also have a shuttle back and forth since they are sister sites). I was able to book my room via booking.com yesterday for $169 a night plus all of the fees & taxes - free cancellation and paying onsite adds a little more but is available.
 
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sls314

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I don't think they have released this information yet, however unless they give a pretty significant discount the rooms are going to be close to $300 a night if you are not sharing a room. I am personally staying at the Inn at Opryland, A Gaylord Hotel - it's right across the street (can walk to convention center if you want to, supposedly they also have a shuttle back and forth since they are sister sites). I was able to book my room via booking.com yesterday for $169 a night plus all of the fees & taxes - free cancellation and paying onsite adds a little more but is available.


There usually is a significant discount for conference attendees on hotels.

For example, in Denver, the hotel's normal room rate would $464/night during the week of the conference. However, the conference attendee rate through AAPC is $259/night.
 

Melissasuewashburn

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Harvest, AL
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There usually is a significant discount for conference attendees on hotels.

For example, in Denver, the hotel's normal room rate would $464/night during the week of the conference. However, the conference attendee rate through AAPC is $259/night.
That is nice to know about the discount and to see that the discount is a significant amount. I will keep that in mind and price the convention center hotel once that information is released. Luckily I did decide to pay the extra for the fee for the free cancellation at the hotel that I already booked. If the rate is similar I may have to switch to the convention center hotel as that would be much more convenient.
 

CODR4FUN

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Shelton, WA
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I heard that there is a block of rooms available but can't be booked until September. Thank you all for your input on this question.
 

Valerie54

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Columbia, TN
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Hi. I'm new! Just joined AAPC tonight, preordered some books and plan on taking the instructor-led CPC course in November. I live somewhat close to Nashville (Columbia) and was wondering if this convention would be something beneficial for me to attend or is it too soon for me to really glean any information there? I have a tad bit of medical experience as I work in an assisted living place now but for a private family. I've done this type of work in the past on and off as I had time. Mostly though, I've been a stay-at-home mom for many years. Ready to start a new career and coding looks exciting to me. Thanks for any advice!
 
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The convention will give you targeted information on coding but nothing to assist with course or exam. It is more general networking and obtaining code changes. Also how codes are correctly billed vs how they are payable. Look at the list of events at the convention to see if it is something you would like to know. Can be good for networking. Have a professional support group is always a plus and a times a necessity. Conventions can also guide you on how to find a position. It can be difficult without experience. If your course does not offer externship placement, when you are close to finishing your course, call around to some practices and inquire if they offer internships. No money but you get experience. It could even lead to them hiring you. Be aware this can not be done remotely. My certificate required 160 hour externship and was placed at a nearby practice. I did 6 hours a day during school hours, was not paying for childcare for a non paying job. The practice hired me at the end of my externship and was there 14 years, working my was up to billing manager. Really investigate the course your taking, going for a specialty can also be beneficial. Check the job market in your area, types of practices. Do not wait to take your coding exam once course is complete, the faster the better while the information is fresh in your mind. Best of luck to you.
 
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