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Feeling sad

  1. #11
    Default
    Medical Coding Books
    Quote Originally Posted by jjlinnjj View Post
    I wish I had positive words for you, but Iíve experienced the same thing. Personally, Iím letting my credential expire and giving up.

    I got my COC-A in April of 2016. I had been working in a Revenue Cycle position for two years at that time, and currently I have 4.5 years of experience between manual charge entry, reporting, analysis, and account reconciliation. Iíve changed job responsibilities several times; at this point Iíve done as much as I possibly can at work to acclimate and familiarize myself with coding without having the chance to actually code, but I canít get a job anywhere because I donít have two years of experience. Itís a complete joke, and at this point I swear that itís like this secret, selective club wherein no new people are given access. I work 50 feet away from our coding department and got references/endorsements from each of my supervisors (who know and interact with the coding supervisors often), and they still rejected me. They even chose to hire independent contractors rather than cultivate their own talent.

    Iím sick of myopic employers, quite frankly. Instead of making individual judgments on applicants and considering their potential/ceiling as an employee, they judge a persons intelligence solely off of their resume. I find it hilarious that every employer claims that coding is an ďup and comingĒ department with so much room for growth when they refuse to give prospective coders their first chance. Employers are either too short sighted or arrogant to remember that they were once in this position and needed someone to crack the door for them. Donít claim to be ambitious or forward thinking and then outright refuse to hire anyone without prior experience, and youíre not more intelligent than anyone else just because youíre in a management position, so stop being condescending to applicants who just want to start their career.

    I just wish I had known it was going to be like this before I pursued this career path, because itís an absolute clown show and one of my biggest regrets.

    That sounds really rough! My advice to you is to keep your credential and look externally. Unfortunately, when applying for jobs, the hunt is not fair. I think that's the best and most diplomatic way I can describe it. Despite many attempts and countless interviews I have had trouble landing jobs that I was more than qualified for. I have a bachelor of science + CPC, etc. vs. other people who didn't, and I still didn't get the jobs I applied for. It's super frustrating and disheartening to get rejected when applying, and even getting so close (two remaining candidates and you're one of them), and you're still let down. I spent almost a whole year (luckily I am working in a position that could keep me somewhat afloat) applying, interviewing, networking, etc. and just received an amazing job offer this week, with an awesome company.

    Consider looking inwards as well. Are you doing anything that might impede you getting the job you want? Employers also look at Facebook/LinkedIn/other social medias these days to screen applicants. Make sure you have all of your "T"s crossed and "I"s dotted, to ensure you make the best impression you can, and give yourself the best chance possible of a new job.

    My point here is to try and keep your focus and don't give up if Coding is a field you love. Yes, there are some people who shouldn't be coders, because it truly requires a certain skill and mindset. However, if you have survived Rev. Cycle and are excelling in your field, then Coding shouldn't be that far away. Consider looking outside your company, and be persistent! There are countless of hints/tips on how to improve your resume/CV on the internet, how to ace your job interview, etc. The tools are out there, just reach out and apply them. Realize that there are people who probably shouldn't be in certain management positions, however you then move onto the next company and try your luck instead. You probably don't want to work for them anyways.

    I get it, getting passed up on job opportunities outright sucks. I've been there almost too many times to count, however persistence WILL pay off if you're doing everything else right. I can testify to that.

    Good luck!
    "Without hard work, nothing grows but weeds"
    -Gordon B. Hinckley

  2. #12
    Red face coding jobs
    I have all the Revenue cycle experience accept for coding. Most of the jobs out in the DFW area wants some kind of certification... so in order for me to get the position I want Ö.I need the Certification. Suggestion when you go to those meetings have an open mind to go there and learn...not to just give out resume.... yes Networking...Networking takes awhile for someone to notice you.

    Get yourself in the door at level entry than go from their.... If that's what I have to do I will.

    Good Luck..... I did send an email to Lexicode to get more information on there program.


    Have a great week.

  3. Default
    the only think i can say is to take the course that allows you to have the a removed from your cpc...its a course that counts as 1-2 years exp.

  4. #14
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    16
    Default An "A" Can Get Hired
    Had my "A" for 2 months when I was hired for a position with the federal government. It's been 3 years now, and I am now making a lateral move. My department has hired 2 others with the CPC-A in the last year. Have you tried Indian Health Services? Any local VA or DOD medical facility? Looked at USA Jobs at all? Lots of employers want a quick and easy hire that will require little work on their end. It's unfortunate that employers don't want to take a chance, but that isn't a scenario exclusive to coding. What's also unfortunate is that the AAPC tells us coders are in big demand when that isn't always the case. Giving up only ensures you most definitely will not get a job.

  5. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by reawagner View Post
    I have all the Revenue cycle experience accept for coding. Most of the jobs out in the DFW area wants some kind of certification... so in order for me to get the position I want Ö.I need the Certification. Suggestion when you go to those meetings have an open mind to go there and learn...not to just give out resume.... yes Networking...Networking takes awhile for someone to notice you.

    Get yourself in the door at level entry than go from their.... If that's what I have to do I will.

    Good Luck..... I did send an email to Lexicode to get more information on there program.


    Have a great week.
    I had my certification in addition to the Rev Cycle experience and it didnít/continues not to matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by VWILLIAMS88 View Post
    the only think i can say is to take the course that allows you to have the a removed from your cpc...its a course that counts as 1-2 years exp.
    Isnít it kind of ridiculous that you have to pay hundreds of dollars just to satiate the concerns of narrow-minded coding managers whose sole barometer for intelligence and success is what is on a candidateís resume?

    Iím certain there are a plethora of certified coders with no experience who could step into positions right now and thrive with the proper training and guidance, and yet we continue to get passed over. I donít know if coding managers are intimidated by new/younger job candidates, or if theyíre intellectually unable to judge a personsí intelligence and potential unless itís written on a resume for them, or a combo of both. How do you expect the industry to grow if youíre just going to recycle the same middle-aged and older people because they have experience? How do you expect new coders to improve and gain experience if you refuse to hire them? Itís a farce, all of it.

  6. Default Yep Very Frustrating
    I agree with all of the comments. I am in the same situation. I had my CCA from Ahima from 2009 and still no coding position. I let that one go a couple of yrs ago. I now have my CPC-A this yr, still no luck in finding a coding position. It's best to have coding as a second career and have a main job generating income. Take a position that's not actually coding while still looking for a coding position. Try getting into medical records or some type of billing.

    It's all been a money pit and a bit shady to me, both ahima and aapc. All of the money that i have spent in books, tests, prep courses, renewal fees, ceu's, etc, over the yrs have been one gigantic headache not to mention the financial strain, i would not do it again. I am going to see what this month brings and what the new year brings and after that i am just going to let my certification expire and move on to something else. I always wanted to work remote that's why i got into coding in the first place, but now i see it was not worth it at all.

    All of these companies that don't hire new coders are only hurting themselves. Just think, there are 100's of new coders every month, just look in our monthly magazine that lists all of these new coders, all of these companies are getting back-logged because they have no coders, they are the ones losing money and losing clients, instead of just getting us new coders on board to help them. It is very funny that they all have short term memory loss, they forget that someone gave them a chance to code not so long ago. I do not and will not recommend anyone to get into coding.

    IT coding might be the only coding that's worth while if you're good with computers and math.

  7. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by phenecia View Post
    I agree with all of the comments. I am in the same situation. I had my CCA from Ahima from 2009 and still no coding position. I let that one go a couple of yrs ago. I now have my CPC-A this yr, still no luck in finding a coding position. It's best to have coding as a second career and have a main job generating income. Take a position that's not actually coding while still looking for a coding position. Try getting into medical records or some type of billing.

    It's all been a money pit and a bit shady to me, both ahima and aapc. All of the money that i have spent in books, tests, prep courses, renewal fees, ceu's, etc, over the yrs have been one gigantic headache not to mention the financial strain, i would not do it again. I am going to see what this month brings and what the new year brings and after that i am just going to let my certification expire and move on to something else. I always wanted to work remote that's why i got into coding in the first place, but now i see it was not worth it at all.

    All of these companies that don't hire new coders are only hurting themselves. Just think, there are 100's of new coders every month, just look in our monthly magazine that lists all of these new coders, all of these companies are getting back-logged because they have no coders, they are the ones losing money and losing clients, instead of just getting us new coders on board to help them. It is very funny that they all have short term memory loss, they forget that someone gave them a chance to code not so long ago. I do not and will not recommend anyone to get into coding.

    IT coding might be the only coding that's worth while if you're good with computers and math.
    Itís insane, perplexing, and frustrating all wrapped into one.

    I work for a large regional health system (tens of thousands of employees) that has grown like crazy in the past ten years. Weíve acquired several hospitals which has increased the workload. Other departments have expanded as a result of the growth and the increased demand as far as work is concerned. What did the coding department do? Hired a bunch of independent contractors from outside the company. They practically beg the longest tenured coders not to retire. The whole ecosystem is toxic.

  8. #18
    Default
    Ok, maybe I am getting too involved here, but I think calling the Medical Coding industry a sham is going too far. I get that you have had some rough and negative experiences, however I do not recognize the picture you are trying to portray here. What you are describing occur in any profession.

    Perhaps instead of slinging mud, you should look what you can do to improve your current situation and position. With every set back, there's something to be learned. Ask any famous and successful person and they will tell you that they have had more failures than successes. Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Michael Jordan, and many others will testify that if you really want something, you need to push forward despite the odds until you get it. If Edison blamed his failures on anything arbitrary, we might still be using candles (probably not, but perhaps at least delayed a number of years. He took note of what didn't work, and what did work and used this to his advantage. Eventually he created a functional light bulb because he failed so many times.

    Perhaps Coding is not for you, or perhaps you are just in a bad situation. If you still want to make a career out of Coding, you still can. You might have to broaden your search criteria, but the opportunities are out there.

    But please...please don't write your bad experiences up to the whole Coding industry being corrupt. That is just blatantly wrong!
    "Without hard work, nothing grows but weeds"
    -Gordon B. Hinckley

  9. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Pathos View Post
    Ok, maybe I am getting too involved here, but I think calling the Medical Coding industry a sham is going too far. I get that you have had some rough and negative experiences, however I do not recognize the picture you are trying to portray here. What you are describing occur in any profession.

    Perhaps instead of slinging mud, you should look what you can do to improve your current situation and position. With every set back, there's something to be learned. Ask any famous and successful person and they will tell you that they have had more failures than successes. Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Michael Jordan, and many others will testify that if you really want something, you need to push forward despite the odds until you get it. If Edison blamed his failures on anything arbitrary, we might still be using candles (probably not, but perhaps at least delayed a number of years. He took note of what didn't work, and what did work and used this to his advantage. Eventually he created a functional light bulb because he failed so many times.

    Perhaps Coding is not for you, or perhaps you are just in a bad situation. If you still want to make a career out of Coding, you still can. You might have to broaden your search criteria, but the opportunities are out there.

    But please...please don't write your bad experiences up to the whole Coding industry being corrupt. That is just blatantly wrong!
    Iím by no means implying any shady or corrupt behavior. Iím saying that there seems to be an abundance of insecurity and/or incompetence amongst coding supervisors, or at the very least there is a major systemic issue with the hiring process. There are people who need someoneís list of accomplishments spelled out in front of them because theyíre not capable of accurately judging a personís intelligence, skill set, or potential via face to face interaction. People who are too myopic to take a chance on a newly certified candidate because they donít have experience and assume that theyíre not capable of doing the job. People who only consider where a person is now as opposed to what their potential ceiling is as a coder. People who are intimidated by younger people who are smarter than them and who could potentially outwork them.

    Between the distance learning, books, CEUís, and renewing my membership, Iíve put well over $1000 of my own money into this field, and nearly three years later my return on that investment is literally $0. I have worked in several different facets of Rev Cycle for almost 5 years. Iíve received two promotions in the past 3 years and am hopeful to get a third in the next few months. All three of my current supervisors are willing to be references for me. I have applied for coding positions in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Las Vegas, and Portland among others (big appeal of pursuing coding was being able to work anywhere). I canít recall seeing a job posting that didnít contain ďminimum two years coding experienceĒ.

    Finding an entry level position should NOT be this futile of an endeavor for me and people like me. Period. Especially considering the garbage I have been fed during interviews about how much room for growth there is in the coding industry and how there will be an increase in jobs over the next several years. It seems fairly evident that new coders, especially young ones, are not wanted.

  10. #20
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by doctordrakeramoray View Post
    I’m by no means implying any shady or corrupt behavior. I’m saying that there seems to be an abundance of insecurity and/or incompetence amongst coding supervisors, or at the very least there is a major systemic issue with the hiring process. There are people who need someone’s list of accomplishments spelled out in front of them because they’re not capable of accurately judging a person’s intelligence, skill set, or potential via face to face interaction. People who are too myopic to take a chance on a newly certified candidate because they don’t have experience and assume that they’re not capable of doing the job. People who only consider where a person is now as opposed to what their potential ceiling is as a coder. People who are intimidated by younger people who are smarter than them and who could potentially outwork them.

    Between the distance learning, books, CEU’s, and renewing my membership, I’ve put well over $1000 of my own money into this field, and nearly three years later my return on that investment is literally $0. I have worked in several different facets of Rev Cycle for almost 5 years. I’ve received two promotions in the past 3 years and am hopeful to get a third in the next few months. All three of my current supervisors are willing to be references for me. I have applied for coding positions in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Las Vegas, and Portland among others (big appeal of pursuing coding was being able to work anywhere). I can’t recall seeing a job posting that didn’t contain “minimum two years coding experience”.

    Finding an entry level position should NOT be this futile of an endeavor for me and people like me. Period. Especially considering the garbage I have been fed during interviews about how much room for growth there is in the coding industry and how there will be an increase in jobs over the next several years. It seems fairly evident that new coders, especially young ones, are not wanted.
    I saw quite a few CPC-A positions available that required no experience in the 2 months I was looking. I was hired 3 weeks after I finished practicode and had my A removed. I just did a quick search (25-30 seconds, including the page loading) and the first job I clicked on required no experience outside of the training needed to pass the exam. Keep looking and trying.

    https://www.ziprecruiter.com/jobs/us...-home-216db3fc
    Last edited by Mayzoo; 12-07-2018 at 08:00 AM.

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