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discrimination??????

  1. #11
    Default Your support is appreciated!
    Medical Coding Books
    Thanks Everybody I appreciate your support. I also agree that she was intimidated by me also and I have a better job opportunity in line. I look forward to my interview tommorow, I will keep you posted. It is comforting to know that I have all of your support.

  2. #12
    Default
    I wish you a lot of luck!! But also, keep in mind that a lot of coders that you meet got their experience the hard way. Long years of coding without credentials. When I was starting to learn to code, there were no RHIT college courses and coding was not something you could study in school. Not to discount your college training...hooray for you. I know how hard it is in college and I can definitely appreciate your hard work! But I just thought that before you judge anyone and misunderstand jealousy for simply a lack of better choices to choose from years ago, may be the reason some people may be threatened by you is that they worked for years in this business and believe that they have worked just as hard as you to get where they are and I agree with the person that said that experience counts for a LOT. So again, good luck with your interview!! I really believe that everything happens for a reason. The way that the supervisor treated you was definitely unfair but maybe you were not meant to work there for someone who would only stunt your growth and learning, but that you were meant to get a better job where you will be treated accordingly. Good luck!!

  3. #13
    Location
    Woodland Hills (Los Angeles), California
    Posts
    94
    Wink
    Your resume looks good; it speaks for itself. I'm not certified nor do I have experience as a coder or biller, but I've worked in medical centers.

    It seems to me that "the handwriting is on the wall." She probably doesn't want you there, so I would move on. I'm sure you're thinking about the bad economy, so you really need the job. However, she may make your life miserable once you're hired; and eventually, you may resign without any unemployment benefits. Ask yourself: "Would I want to work with her if she doesn't want me there?" My answer would be "no." Then I would follow my gut feeling and move on.

    Also, look at the long term point of view. Think about your future in the coding business. Experience as an inpatient coder is really necessary. From what I've learned with trying to dissect these operating reports is that inpatient coding in the real world is not an easy job, and my instructor told us that we will be interrogated as to why we do things this way or that. Nevertheless, we have to stand our ground and be "on top of our game." It is a lot harder than what we've learned in school, and there are a lot of things that can only be learned as a result from experience. It's a new challenge every day, and I'm sure you have a "passion" for coding--which is really needed. Maybe this individual feels that the chemistry isn't there between you and the position.

    I know this is disheartening; it can be frustrating, and I wished someone had told me all of this before I started my coding classes--but all I can do now is keep trying. I love coding; I can't give up, because I've come too far now.

    Keep in mind you're not the only one in this situation. Everyone is going through something, especially during this recession.
    Last edited by Sonjagirl; 07-09-2009 at 06:26 PM.

  4. Default
    Please let us know how your job interview went! As I'm sure you know from your classes and your experience, inpatient and outpatient coding is like the difference between a lion and a house cat. While your experience looks awesome, she may need someone who she doesn't have to "train" in the differences between the 2 worlds. You and I both know that with your classes, you're already trained in those difference, but maybe she doesn't, or doesn't want to admit it.

    I too have been in a situation where I knew more than my boss. I tried really hard not to rub it in her face, but it was difficult when I was passed over for promotion because the clinic manager valued my skills too much in the position I was in. That I was right, did eventually bear itself out in that my boss was let go, but I had already left the company and now have a wonderful job with wonderful benefits. Don't get discouraged, your shining star position is out there waiting to be found.

  5. #15
    Default How about the other side of the fence?
    Experience in a physician office does not at all equal experience coding in a facility setting, regardless of the length of time.

    Facilities code using DRG's, Rev Codes, then CPT and HCPCS. Depending one the carrier, they may even bill with ICD-9 procedural codes. For most services, a CPT or HCPCS isn't even required! To code for a facility, unless your schooling went into great detail regarding the differences, your physician coding experience wouldn't do you much good.

    So, before you get too terribly upset, maybe take the time to listen to her statement that she's looking for someone who can, without much training, step in and take over the job.

    Sorry if that sounds harsh, but the reality is, employers are trying to cut costs and new employee training is one of them!

  6. #16
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by alboyd View Post
    Experience in a physician office does not at all equal experience coding in a facility setting, regardless of the length of time.

    Facilities code using DRG's, Rev Codes, then CPT and HCPCS. Depending one the carrier, they may even bill with ICD-9 procedural codes. For most services, a CPT or HCPCS isn't even required! To code for a facility, unless your schooling went into great detail regarding the differences, your physician coding experience wouldn't do you much good.

    So, before you get too terribly upset, maybe take the time to listen to her statement that she's looking for someone who can, without much training, step in and take over the job.

    Sorry if that sounds harsh, but the reality is, employers are trying to cut costs and new employee training is one of them!
    Training; DRG's, Rev Codes, CPT, HCPCS codes.........! If someone is competant enough to get CPC and/or certs through the other organization.....!Wouldn't you agree it would be cheaper to hire someone new who is competant in the coding language who is asking for a small sallery versus the gold digger who want a hundred grand a year because they are fluent in one type of coding: facility....! You don't have to spend weeks training a coder new to a different methodology which can be learned in the matter of hours....!the chicken before the egg is very inaccurate to apply in coding scenario.....! I have heard others over forums even disclose it isn't what you know but who you know.....! and with that said..... not every coder is a gold digger!
    Last edited by 007CPC; 07-16-2009 at 04:34 PM.

  7. #17
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by alboyd View Post
    Experience in a physician office does not at all equal experience coding in a facility setting, regardless of the length of time.

    Facilities code using DRG's, Rev Codes, then CPT and HCPCS. Depending one the carrier, they may even bill with ICD-9 procedural codes. For most services, a CPT or HCPCS isn't even required! To code for a facility, unless your schooling went into great detail regarding the differences, your physician coding experience wouldn't do you much good.

    So, before you get too terribly upset, maybe take the time to listen to her statement that she's looking for someone who can, without much training, step in and take over the job.

    Sorry if that sounds harsh, but the reality is, employers are trying to cut costs and new employee training is one of them!

    One more!


    I hear citizens complaining that they are only making $20,000 when a year ago they were making $50,000; cry me a river....recession..... I laugh at recessions. And, the medical doctor is what makes your jobs lucrative in coding facility or professional, which is why CPC people are more valuable to the operation in times of no recession....!

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