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Thread: WHat should I wear job searching

  1. #1

    Default WHat should I wear job searching

    Hi, I am recently-credenatialed medical biller, coding and medical administratiove specialist. I am ready to start my job search and was wondering what I should wear to drop off my resume to offices. I don't know how conservative this field is? Please let me know what you think.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jujubejewels View Post
    Hi, I am recently-credenatialed medical biller, coding and medical administratiove specialist. I am ready to start my job search and was wondering what I should wear to drop off my resume to offices. I don't know how conservative this field is? Please let me know what you think.
    I would do "business casual" attire.

    Every office is differant, at my previous employer that I was with for almost 12 years our billing staff wore business attire, when I left there and went my current employer which is a dr office the billing staff wore white scrubs. I asked my boss if that was a must and she said no, it was the last billing supevisors choice to wear scrubs. We now wear business attire and on Fridays business casual.

    Best of luck on your job hunt!
    Roxanne Thames CPC, CPC-I, CEMC
    rthamescpci@gmail.com


    "Remember the greatest gift is not found in the store but in the heart of true friends"

  3. #3
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    I had a professor once tell me when applying for a job you can never go wrong with what you would were to church. Now keep in mind his era was 50's and 60's, I have observed some younger folks at church in atire I would not hoe the garden in! You want the first impression to be favorable and lasting. Yes I would say business casual, as long as that does not mean jeans or tee shirts, and bare midrift! Also no flip flops. Keep in mind professional, in your appearance and presentation. Do not fold your resume' and have your own pen and a stiff folder to use as a pad for filling out applications. Watch your spelling carefully, and be ready and prepared to take a coding exam, if you have code books then take them with you and have them at your ready. One place where I worked we did this, we gave a coding test just to see what the ability of the prospective employee was, and we gave no notice for this, it was part of the application process. Keep your head up and good luck!

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  4. #4
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    Both of these suggestions are good. I have always heard you should wear what you would wear while on the job. So I agree that business to business casual for dropping off resumes. You never know when you might get lucky and get interviewed on the spot! Good luck to you, good initiative!
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  5. #5

    Default Traditional Dress

    I always suggest that you develop a bit of a "job hunting" wardrobe. I have about 3-4 items that can mixed and matched to create greater selection. Pick a neutral color (black, navy, grey) and then have a skirt, blazer, dress and dress pants that can be worn in combination. By adding color with shirts, scarves, etc. You would be surprised how far this can go. They need not be expensive. You'll want your personality and credentials to stand out not your attire. Also, send a quick thank you note to the interviewer.

    Good Luck.

  6. #6
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    Default Making a good first impression

    I would err on the side of conservative business attire - that means a suit (skirt or pants), or possibly a dress, stockings and close-toe shoes for a woman. For a man, a suit or dress slack with blazer - and yes, you should wear a tie.

    I think emcallister has some great tips on building that "job interview" wardrobe.

    You want to give the impression that you are serious about seeking - and performing - a good job.

    You can wear business "casual" after you get the job (if allowed in your workplace).

    Best of luck!

    F Tessa Bartels, CPC, CEMC

  7. #7

    Default

    My husband who is a nurse educator was once asked to come speak at a school for propsective STNA's who were getting ready to graduate about what to wear,how to present themselves, etc. At that time, his position included HR responsibilities.

    He told them business casual, no low-cut or too-tight, clingy clothes, nothing too short (really just above the knee or lower for skirts), no sweatpants, no jeans, no bare midriffs. Keep jewelry to a conservative - no large, dangling earrings or noisy bracelets or things that can be a distraction. Don't chew gum, don't talk on your cell phone - put it in vibrate while in the office/facility. He said there were so many people who came in to apply for jobs that were automatically not even considered for positions based upon the way they looked and or conducted themselves just while waiting in the waiting room for a few minutes.

    Present yourself in a professional, competent manner. Make sure your resume doesn't have any spelling or grammatical errors. I personally have seen MBA's apply for jobs where I currently work with major spelling errors.

    Good luck!

  8. #8
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    Contact the HR department where you are interviewing, and ask for a copy of their dress code. I once interviewed someone who appeared for a job interview in an outfit that violated our dress code. Oops!

    In coding, research is very important, so make it a point to research the facility where you are applying so that you are able to make a great impression.

  9. #9
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    I agree with FTessaBartels. Dress up, even if the office is more casual. Give the full impression with both dress and speech that you are a professional.

  10. #10

    Default what to wear

    I agree with all of the postings. From an employer's point of view, if you are a professional coder, one might expect to see someone neat and put together well, no loose details. However, it's the whole package that the employer sees from the firm handshake, saying your employer's name while you are shaking hands, making positive eye contact, coming across with a very self assured, confident coding personality.

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