Results 1 to 7 of 7

debridement-can anyone help?

  1. Default debridement-can anyone help?
    Exam Training Packages
    can anyone help? Dr did a debridement of skin full thickness on two toes (T1 and T6).

    How would that be coded? 11042 seperately with the approp modifiers or once with mod 51 and T1 and T6?

    Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,570
    Default
    you do not use toe modifiers for skin debridements. so do
    11042
    11042 59 51

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  3. Default
    Each full thickness debridement should be reported with CPT 11041 if the physician documented an excisional debridement. Modifier 59 should be appended to one of the debridements along with the T1 and T6 modifiers to the location of the wounds that were debrided.

  4. #4
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,570
    Default
    Whichever code documentation supports 11041 or 11042 with a 59 on the second, but no to the T modifiers. Skin is one continuous organ which has no single identifiable sites just separate places. So you you use the 59 to show separate site of the same organ. Skin is not part of the toe it is skin.

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  5. Default
    The skin, toenail, subcutaneous tissue, muscles and bone all together comprise the toe. I believe the T-modifiers should be used because they describe the location of the debridement, whereas the
    1104X codes only capture the depth of the debridement

    That's my thought

    Patricia Linzsey, CPC, CEMC

  6. #6
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,570
    Default
    Patricia, from an anatomical perspective skin is not part of the toe. The T modifiers are anatomical modifiers and as such are not applicable to skin areas. Skin is one continuous organ it has different sites but it does not have toes it covers the toes, it is not part of the toe.

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  7. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchellde View Post
    Patricia, from an anatomical perspective skin is not part of the toe. The T modifiers are anatomical modifiers and as such are not applicable to skin areas. Skin is one continuous organ it has different sites but it does not have toes it covers the toes, it is not part of the toe.
    I believe that The T modifier is only required for medicare patients any other insurance doesn't requiere the modifier.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-30-2015, 11:10 AM
  2. Debridement Help!!
    By Jckidder in forum Billing/Reimbursement
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-18-2011, 02:29 PM
  3. Debridement vs operative debridement
    By donnagullikson in forum Medical Coding General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-21-2010, 05:28 AM
  4. Operative debridement vs regular debridement
    By donnagullikson in forum Medical Coding General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-17-2010, 06:30 AM
  5. Debridement-Sounds like
    By Zina in forum General Surgery
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-18-2010, 02:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Enjoying Our Forums?

AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals.

Join Now Continue Reading Without Full Access

Already a Member?

Login

Close Message

In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to:

  • Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world.
  • Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world.
  • Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare.
  • Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences.
  • Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members also have opportunities to save on heath, life, and liability insurance.
  • Become a member of a local chapter and attend regular meetings.