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Thread: Traveling Coders Pros and Cons?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007

    Default Traveling Coders Pros and Cons?

    AAPC: Back to School
    Is anyone here a traveling coder/consultant? IF so, what are the pros and cons of this position? How often do you travel? I'd be grateful if you can share your experiences.

    I am considering this because I need to find a better opportunity in order to support a family of four on my own due to my husband being disabled and unable to work.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Oil City


    There are pros and cons to working for these companies in my opinion.
    Check into their policies hard before giving up a steady job. Most do not tell you that if you are in between jobs for them you must collect unemployment and if they want to send you some place that you do not want to go you can not collect unemployment. Also if you go a few weeks without steady work with them you may lose your health insurance or be forced to pay out of your own pocket for it.

    I know a few of people who have worked for companies and so far it has worked out for most of them, some not so lucky. Two I know were sent out of town for projects and have not been able to come back closer to home.

    They pay for these jobs is good. Travel is often and if you are not tied down it works better.

    The bottom line is do all the research and ask all the questions you can think of.
    Rhonda Buckholtz, CPC, CPC-I, CGSC, COBGC, CEPDC, CENTC
    Vice President, ICD-10
    800-626-2633 ext 183
    Fax: 814-217-0447

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Greeley, Colorado


    I worked for one of these companies for a brief period of time. It was an interesting experience. It didn't work out for me, but I'm glad to have had the experience. I met some great people traveling for the same company and staying in the same hotels - they were a family away from home. But the bottom line is it really only works if you don't have family at "home". I would be gone three weeks at a time and home one week. What they don't tell you is that they don't guarantee 40 hrs/wk. I was "working" an average of about 26-30 hrs/wk and sitting in a hotel room thousands of miles away from home the rest of the time. That's my biggest complaint about the traveling job - no guarantee's!

  4. #4


    It is true that you have to watch out for and do your research on the company that you want to work for while traveling/coding as a consultant. However, if you chose to work full-time for one of these companies you have the option to take out and and all of their full-time benefits.

    I have worked for K-Force almost two years now and have had remote coding assignments as well as on-site projects. While on-site I have met some wonderful coding friends and have expanded my coding based knowledge with each new assignment given.

    The down side is airports, luggage, and being away from your familiy. If you choose to be a traveling coder/consultant your family will have to be flexible with your time schedule. My family is raised, my husband retired, and I am at a good time in my life where I can travel.

    As with any new endeavor that you are willing to try, research, research, research.

    Diana Yates,CPC-I

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007


    Thank you all for your quick responses! I really appreciate it.

    It is just one of many things I am considering. I am little wary of leaving my family behind for a long stretch of time while traveling to onsite locations. I am young and my children are only 4 and 8 years old. However, due to some circumstances at home, I have to step out of my comfort zone (coding at home but without benefits and no room for advancement) and challenge myself because I know I can be so much more in my career. I want to be able to provide for my family seeing that my husband will not be able to work again. I want more challenges and chances to move up the ladder. I guess I have to think some more on this....figure out where I want to go next. To travel or not to travel is the question. If it is possible for my family to come and stay for few days visiting my travel site, then maybe I will consider it. I dont know.

    My next issue is how will the clients react to a deaf traveling coder? Unfortunately, some companies shut me out once they learned I am deaf, But my deafness has NO bearings on my ability to code. I am lucky to have this current job BUT like I said no benefits or no room to move up.

    In case some are wondering, I did search for local jobs but the possibilities are limited. I have put in applications for jobs in the nearest city (Chicago) so wish me luck. Like I said, so many paths I can take. Just need to get all the coders' experiences and information before I decide what the next step I need to take.

    LOL...sorry for the rambling. It is just time for me to spread my wings and fly careerwise.

  6. #6


    If you will contact me at 618 521-5330 I will give you a name of a wonderful lady that I met on-site who is also deaf and a traveling coder. I know she will help you in any way that she can.

    Diana Yates, CPC-I

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