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Thread: 1cc = how many mg

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    CHENNAI
    Posts
    33

    Question 1cc = how many mg

    Hi All,

    Please help me to clarify my doubt

    1cc equal to how many mg?

    10cc of 1% xylocaine was used, so how to convert cc to mg

    because J2001=10mg.

    Thanks for advance

    BanuCPC.

  2. #2

    Default

    We had our local Medicaid figure it for us and for J2001, 1cc = 1 unit

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fontana
    Posts
    170

    Default

    look up any conversion calculator on the internet to help you convert from one to another

    Quote Originally Posted by banumathy View Post
    Hi All,

    Please help me to clarify my doubt

    1cc equal to how many mg?

    10cc of 1% xylocaine was used, so how to convert cc to mg

    because J2001=10mg.

    Thanks for advance

    BanuCPC.
    Rachele Porter, AS, CPC, CPC-H, CEDC
    no weapons formed against me shall prosper

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    19

    Default

    1cc of Kenalog is equal to 40mg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Houma, La.
    Posts
    35

    Smile

    Xylocaine 1% is just that. There is no mg conversion, so no matter how may cc's you use it's just still a 1% solution. IV and IM drugs come in mg's per cc.
    Example: Kenalog comes in 20mg per cc and also 40mg per cc. Hope this helps.

    Sally Thibodeaux CCS,CPC,LPN
    Houma,La. Chapter

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    CHENNAI
    Posts
    33

    Default

    sorry sthibo,

    I didn't get you,

    if provider used 10cc or 1000cc of 1% lidocaine, then we can just code J2001 only without any quanty right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    2,046

    Default

    You can only code xylocaine J2001 for IV. If it is just for local anesthetic it is not billable per CPT surgery package.
    Lisa Bledsoe, CPC, CPMA

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Athens, Ga.
    Posts
    693

    Default

    1mg = 1cc ... that's an standard unit of metric measure

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Denver Colorado
    Posts
    254

    Default

    The conversion will vary with the drug. Milligram (mg) is a factor of concentration or strength (how much drug) while cubic centimeter (cc) aka milliliter (ml) is a factor of volume.

    I sometimes use coffee as an illustration to help non-clinical staff with these concepts.

    ...For example, small, medium or large or tall, grande or venti describe the volume of the drink but not how strong it is.

    Whereas "shots" describe the concentration or strength, i.e. 2 shots of espresso is not as strong as 4 shots of espresso.

    So a tall cup of coffee with four shots of espresso is stronger than a tall cup of coffee with one shot. But a tall cup of coffee with no extra shots versus a venti cup of coffee with no extra shots have the same strength or concentration but just different volume.

    So depending upon the HCPCS code description for the drug, you may need to know one or the other or both. For example, if 2 cc (volume) of Kenalog 40mg / cc (concentration / strength) is injected, the provider actually injected a total of 80 mg of Kenalog (40 * 2) and would be reported with 8 units of J3301.

    Whereas if 1 cc of Kenalog 40 mg /cc were injected (less volume but same strength), only 40 mg was injected and 4 units of J3301 would be billed. We would bill the same units of J3301 for 4 cc of Kenalog 10 mg / cc (more volume of less concentrated)

    So volume (cc, ml, liters, etc) is not synonomous with concentration / strength (micrograms, milligrams, grams, etc)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee WI
    Posts
    4,452

    Default Weight vs Volume

    mg = Milligram is a measure of weight.
    cc = Cubic Centimeter is a measure of volume.

    One quart (volume) of lead will weigh more than one quart (same volume) of feathers.

    Or, put another way ... one pound (weight) of lead will take up less space (volume) than one pound (same weight) of feathers.

    So there is no standard conversion. It depends on what you are measuring.

    F Tessa Bartels, CPC, CEMC

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