Page 22 of 25 FirstFirst ... 1213141516171819202122232425 LastLast
Results 211 to 220 of 242

No Coding Jobs for inexperienced Coders

  1. #211
    Location
    Charleston, South Carolina
    Posts
    641
    Default
    Exam Training Packages
    Patti,

    Kevin made a very valid point. I am sure he in no way meant to demean anyone. I have been in this field for almost 30 years. My first job out of college, with an AA degree, was a medical secretary, my second was a medical receptionist. I then worked as a medical records clerk in a prison. My point being, we all started somewhere. With each position you learn, the more you learn, the further you will go. Dream jobs are not handed to anyone but the very lucky few. We all had to "pay our dues" just like newer coders (or any profession) will have to do. Its not an easy world sometimes....

    Good luck to you!!
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  2. #212
    Location
    Dover Seacoast New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,971
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Pattis47@gmail.com View Post
    Kevin,
    Just wanted to thank you for your comments. However, do I use CPC-FC to indicate I want to be a file clerk, or CPC-DE for data entry. I spent a year of my life getting a good education to become a coder. I lost a years salary, combined that was more than 45K. I have had the opportunity in the past to do customer service, data entry, file clerk, and other entry level jobs and none of them required a CPC.
    I want to believe you meant well with your comments, but next time think about your words before you demean us. Your bio indicates you have 9 years experience. Is that all with the same company? Did you start in data entry or as a file clerk? Again, I hope you meant well, but I cannot afford to take a 20K annual pay cut to be a file clerk.
    In defense of Kevin, I would like to point out that you chose to quit your job and take a pay cut to get your coding education, and if you expected to start out at 45K, you were sadly misinformed.

    I am exhaused at the volume of new coders who have posted on this board, thinking that coding was going to be some kind of get-rich-quick scheme whereby they would train for eight weeks and make six figures....and now are ticked off because it didn't pan out. Skill number one for coders is to be able to do your research. Enough said.

    Kevin made some very valid suggestions, and if you're truly dedicated to beginning a career in the coding field, you'd be wise to take his advice. Your high and mighty attitude about being just a file clerk is disappointing. We all started somewhere. I started by answering phones and posting payments for 7 bucks an hour, in case you're interested. I don't think Kevin's post was at all demeaning, but you've made it that way with your reluctance to start where everyone starts....at the bottom. It was an unfortunate comment, and remember, managers are reading this board. Good luck, and hopefully you'll be able to start at the top, as you planned.
    Pam Brooks, MHA, COC, PCS, CPC, AAPC Fellow
    Coding Manager
    Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
    Dover, NH 03820

    If you can dream it, you can do it. Walt Disney

  3. #213
    Location
    Charleston, WV
    Posts
    245
    Default
    I didn't see anything demeaning in Kevin's post. I have said before (maybe even in this thread, I'm not going back to check) that one of the problems is that instructors and schools who are offering coding classes are luring people in with unrealistic promises. New coders are entering the job market with high expectations and are disappointed when they are unrealized.

    I started in the mailroom of a third party administrator and worked my way up to management. I chose to change careers and become a coder. I took a (very VERY large) pay cut. (No, I didn't have a spouse making up the difference. I had to change my lifestyle.) I had to start over in patient accounts, not coding. But because of my experience in the general field, I quickly got a coding position. Through hard work and perseverance, I am now one of those hiring managers Pam mentioned. (And as a manager, I can guarantee that at least some of us do look at these boards before calling an applicant for an interview.)

    I truly wish the best for everyone. What everyone needs to realize is that you cannot start at the top. Once there was a shortage of coders and maybe there still is in some areas. In my experience, there is not much of a shortage any more. Managers are going to hire those with experience before they are going to hire those without. That is only logical and is the same in any industry.

    My advice to everyone is to stop thinking it is beneath you to take a job you consider inferior to the one you want. View every opportunity as another step toward your goal. Take the experience you need wherever you can get it. Use these forums to network in a positive way. Posting that you know mare than experienced coders because you just graduated and we probably don't keep up with new codes is NOT the way to make good connections on a site filled with experienced coders.

  4. #214
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    331
    Default
    The first thing that comes to mind after reading both, Kevin and Patti's, posts is "wow". I find it extremely ironic that you could call Kevin's post demeaning, Patti. If anything, I feel that YOUR post is demeaning. It comes off as you looking down your nose at those that hold postions such as those that Kevin named. Those are the positions that MANY of the coders/billers/auditors that frequent this forum started out in. You cannot find a job as a coder, but you're too good for all those job examples given, which will help get you to the position you want to be in? Kevin was merely offering helpful opinions/ options for those of you having trouble "getting your foot in the door". It's true that soooo many people think that once they pass that CPC test, you get sent your new hire paperwork along with your score. Having a certification does not secure you a job. Seeming that you are just SO ABOVE taking jobs that are for the lowly peons, I doubt you'll have much luck finding your coveted position. I find it funny that you say that you cannot afford to take a pay cut as a means to an end, but you're okay with making NOTHING because you just so much better than a file clerk. How DARE Kevin suggest such a thing!?! I can't help but wonder if your holier than thou attitude has been a major hindrance in the search for a job that lives up to your standards. Good luck, seems like you'll need it.
    Vanessa Mier, CPC

  5. #215
    Default Kevin's post is excellent advice.
    Pattis,
    I don't think you are doing yourself any favors by getting hypersensitive when experienced coders are offering their input and providing suggestions. Kevin is certainly not demeaning you. His point is, we all had to start somewhere. I would be willing to say most members
    DID start as a file clerk, receptionist, billing representative, etc. Why are these positions demeaning? They are vital to any healthcare organization and an excellent segue into coding. Many of us did make a career transition and accept a lower income for a year or two to begin getting experience and establishing ourselves in the field.

    Anyone getting an education in coding and preparing for the CPC should pretty much expect that's going to be the case for them as well. If it isn't, and you're able to be hired as a CPC-A w/ little or no experience, that's great! But that is the exception, certainly not the rule.

    It's not that we haven't been in your shoes, it's that we have and we know how you can be successful in the industry. I don't know if coding instructors are making unrealistic promises about what to expect once you have completed your program, or if it's a matter of selective hearing, but too many people on this thread feel entitled to a coding position right out of school. You are not entitled, you have to work very hard. This is true in any profession.

    The best of luck to you in your endeavors. Please don't dismiss the input of some of the veteran coders on this board that make every effort to be a valuable resource and give good information.

  6. #216
    Default
    This is really disappointing. And I see a lot of threads with same topic. No job for inexperienced coders. It is true it really is not what you know but who you know. I know someone who was working as CNA, she has no formal education in coding at all nor certification, but since she has worked on that hospital a long time they hire her in coding position. Although she lost her job coz she was found to be letting someone punch her in eventhough she comes in late.


    But I will not let these unfortunate truth hinder me to apply for coding jobs. Hopefully if I was given a chance for interview and they see my proficiency on practical lessons I learned in my coding certification PLUS me passing CPC certification, it is enough proof that I am ready for the job. All I need is to 'sell' myself, by showing my knowledge and abilities to the employers.
    Last edited by medcoder9; 12-05-2010 at 06:47 PM.

  7. #217
    Talking
    Quote Originally Posted by medcoder9 View Post
    This is really disappointing. And I see a lot of threads with same topic. No job for inexperienced coders. It is true it really is not what you know but who you know. I know someone who was working as CNA, she has no formal education in coding at all nor certification, but since she has worked on that hospital a long time they hire her in coding position. Although she lost her job coz she was found to be letting someone punch her in eventhough she comes in late.


    But I will not let these unfortunate truth hinder me to apply for coding jobs. Hopefully if I was given a chance for interview and they see my proficiency on practical lessons I learned in my coding certification PLUS me passing CPC certification, it is enough proof that I am ready for the job. All I need is to 'sell' myself, by showing my knowledge and abilities to the employers.
    I disagree with your first thought...It's not who you know, it's how flexible you are willing to be. I work for a multi-specialty/multi-practice management company - we have over 150 providers and several clinics. I'm not a coder - I started out as a commercial insurance follow-up rep, and I've done it for 3 years. I get to do a lot of coding, and analyzing coding errors, but I've also become well versed in how insurance works, payer policies, and laws and regulations, which set me up for getting my auditing certification. Sure I don't code all day, every day, but I get to use my coding skills writing appeals, and in teaching others why claims processed the way that they did. I probably could have had a coder position a while back if I had wanted it (since I was able to prove myself in follow-up), but I like the problem-solving and getting to argue that came with my job. (There's nothing more awesome than having an insurance company change their claim policies because you proved them wrong) .

    Anyways, I took the CPMA, and was immediately promoted to a new position when I passed, and I'd have never made it to this point if I had been picky about where I started out. I guess the point is, keep your mind open, or you might miss opportunities that you wouldn't have thought of on your own.

    The CPC is preferred at my employer, but if you're taking an entry level position that doesn't necessarily require it, making a big deal out of it might sound like you're going to be too expensive, or at least dissatisfied with the going pay rate. Believe me, they will hire someone with no experience over a CPC in a heartbeat if they think the CPC will jump ship the second something better comes along. I've seen it happen dozens of times. They're trying to run a business, and the risk of losing someone to turnover will always seem worse than hiring someone who's not certified. If you quit, they have to start the whole process over again (advertising the opening, sorting through a pile of applications, wasted production time in interviewing, and then training the next person). It adds up.

    Sell yourself as qualified, yet eager to learn more, and let your resume mention your credentials. Appearing overqualified will not help you in this field when you're just starting out.

  8. Default Finding entry level position
    I too, am a newly certified coder (9/2009). I have been applying for multiple openings, all of which have the least experience requirements. I have also not limited myself to my region. I am applying all over the country, trying to increase my chances. Out of 30 some applications, i have received 3 replies, all negative. Most of the applications i get the reply that they have received my information, and nothing more. I am intent on continuing my search, since i took it upon myself to get my coding education. I only have one question for the employers out there. You want experienced people, but how do we get our experience, unless we can get a job??

  9. #219
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    331
    Default Too much internet, not enough pavement hitting
    I think, also, that people are relying a bit too much on internet searching for jobs. In any given area, there are multiple doctors' offices and/or hospitals. You need to get out there and put in the foot work. Put in applications at these offices and ask to speak to an administrator. Be sure to explain that you are a certified coder BUT would be willing to take any position to get your foot in the door. Sometimes it takes some getting to know someone before trusting their ability to code. If you prove yourself to be competent in other areas of the medical field, you'll be more likely to be considered for your job of choice. I know for a fact that many times, resumes and applications that are put in online are either never looked at, or are quickly glanced at and put to the side. People like to put a face to the resume. An applicant can sound GREAT on paper and then when they walk in it's a completely different story. I know we're part of the Information Age and all, but some things just work better "old school".
    Vanessa Mier, CPC

  10. #220
    Thumbs up
    Quote Originally Posted by ohn0disaster View Post
    I think, also, that people are relying a bit too much on internet searching for jobs. In any given area, there are multiple doctors' offices and/or hospitals. You need to get out there and put in the foot work. Put in applications at these offices and ask to speak to an administrator. Be sure to explain that you are a certified coder BUT would be willing to take any position to get your foot in the door. Sometimes it takes some getting to know someone before trusting their ability to code. If you prove yourself to be competent in other areas of the medical field, you'll be more likely to be considered for your job of choice. I know for a fact that many times, resumes and applications that are put in online are either never looked at, or are quickly glanced at and put to the side. People like to put a face to the resume. An applicant can sound GREAT on paper and then when they walk in it's a completely different story. I know we're part of the Information Age and all, but some things just work better "old school".
    I agree. I'm guilty of too much "internet" and email applications. I will do differently once I get my CPC exam and finish the seasonal job I have at Greenberg Smoked Turkeys (And preparing for my CPC exam on Dec. 11).

Similar Threads

  1. coders jobs
    By tswest in forum Employment General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-26-2009, 02:54 PM
  2. / Jobs as Medical Biller/Coders???
    By utgirl in forum Employment General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-22-2009, 06:59 PM
  3. Billers/coders olympia wa jobs
    By amatlack in forum Job Postings
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-21-2009, 10:44 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Enjoying Our Forums?

AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals.

Join Now Continue Reading Without Full Access

Already a Member?

Login

Close Message

In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to:

  • Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world.
  • Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world.
  • Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare.
  • Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences.
  • Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members also have opportunities to save on heath, life, and liability insurance.
  • Become a member of a local chapter and attend regular meetings.