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No Coding Jobs for inexperienced Coders

  1. #221
    Location
    Charleston, South Carolina
    Posts
    641
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    Medical Coding Books
    Quote Originally Posted by Pattis47@gmail.com View Post
    I took everyones advice from this forum and called the local hospitals, doctors, and billing companies and did my research. Before you spend any more money on AAPC call your local billing offices and ask them if they will hire you without the "A". I did that and not one company was willing to hire me because I still didn't have 2 years CODING experinnce. I was told time and again, with the economy the way it is they can hire coders with 5-10 yrs exp for the same money they would pay me. My rebuttal to them was; but do they know the new codes, and updates that we were taught in the class and have kept up with after our schooling ended. Do they go to regular update seminars or do they just code what they know from the past and have their claims returned and dont know why. Some of the people were honest and admitted they didn't send their employees for continuing education refreshers. Others didn't answer, but you could see the wheels in their head start to spin with the thought that maybe they did have a complacency problem that might be costing them money.
    I wanted to commment on this as far as stating current coders are not up on changes if they haven't attended a seminar in the past year. I won't say all, but almost all coders do continuing education yearly in some form or another. I had a previous employer who paid nothing toward my certification or CEUs, but we did get new books each year and I went thru them cover to cover looking for changes and updates, as well as read anything I could get my hands on. For you to feel you are better than seasoned coders, because you had "current schooling" over those who don't attend seminars is wrong. I certainly can't speak for everyone, but I believe part of being a coder is knowing you have to keep up with updates in some way, shape or form, and the coders I know, believe this and do this.

    Respectfully,
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  2. Default A little hope....
    I started out in the medical industry as an admissions coordinator for a SNF. Soon after leaving, I found out I was pregnant with my little man. I decided to stay home for my pregnancy and son's first year. By the time he was out, I was going stir crazy and knew I needed to work as soon as that little bugger had his first birthday! But, I also knew that a year out of the work force (for whatever reason), would hinder my ability to find work. So, I enrolled in a local vocational school's billing and coding program. As soon as I graduated, I printed out about 200 resumes and cover letters and no joke, hit the pavement. Every morning, I hit the internet job sites and applied where applicable, then I would get on yellowpages.com and make a schedule and "route" of the places I would hand deliver my resume. I accepted my current job less than a month after graduation, even without true billing experience. The moral of my story? As cliche as it may be, "Hard work, dedication, and motivation TRULY pay off." Good luck!

  3. #223
    Thumbs up
    Quote Originally Posted by mmorningstarcpc View Post
    I wanted to commment on this as far as stating current coders are not up on changes if they haven't attended a seminar in the past year. I won't say all, but almost all coders do continuing education yearly in some form or another. I had a previous employer who paid nothing toward my certification or CEUs, but we did get new books each year and I went thru them cover to cover looking for changes and updates, as well as read anything I could get my hands on. For you to feel you are better than seasoned coders, because you had "current schooling" over those who don't attend seminars is wrong. I certainly can't speak for everyone, but I believe part of being a coder is knowing you have to keep up with updates in some way, shape or form, and the coders I know, believe this and do this.

    Respectfully,
    Quote Originally Posted by EMCordone View Post
    I started out in the medical industry as an admissions coordinator for a SNF. Soon after leaving, I found out I was pregnant with my little man. I decided to stay home for my pregnancy and son's first year. By the time he was out, I was going stir crazy and knew I needed to work as soon as that little bugger had his first birthday! But, I also knew that a year out of the work force (for whatever reason), would hinder my ability to find work. So, I enrolled in a local vocational school's billing and coding program. As soon as I graduated, I printed out about 200 resumes and cover letters and no joke, hit the pavement. Every morning, I hit the internet job sites and applied where applicable, then I would get on yellowpages.com and make a schedule and "route" of the places I would hand deliver my resume. I accepted my current job less than a month after graduation, even without true billing experience. The moral of my story? As cliche as it may be, "Hard work, dedication, and motivation TRULY pay off." Good luck!
    I agree, mmorningstarcpc and EMCordone. I am not experienced. Not enough. Just taking coding courses does not substitute for true coding experience. Even though I had two coding courses and spent about 7 mos. of hands-on-coding training which was a requirement for my capstone course, is not the same as actually working for two years coding in real life. There is still so much I don't know.. I might have known more than I do now regarding my coding knowledge, but not enough to qualify me to start coding on my own. I have thought about working as a "volunteer" in a coding department, but volunteers do not have access to the computer systems as paid employees. Coders, in some offices, also enter their own coding information into the system after they complete their coding tasks as do patient account posting reps (I'm not sure if that's what they're called or not) and balance what they entered at the end of each batch (after lunch and before leaving for the day). I began getting used to coding and remembering several codes after seeing the same ones every day that I was in the office. I know I could do that again. But being certified will show the employer that I am capable of being trained to code, and keeping up with coding updates, rules, regulations, and the health care laws, etc. Just merely taking courses and having a certification in coding is not enough. Same for Drs and nurses, would you want to go to a dr or nurse that just graduated and been licensed without experience??? Not me. Same for coders. We still need years of thorough training to be accurate with coding, and knowing the laws, etc., to keep the physicians, etc., from getting in trouble (from possible fraud, etc.) for wrongful coding and reimbursements which could be denied because someone wasn't adequately trained and qualified as a coder.

    Also, it is true, about looking for jobs. You have to get out every day (which I plan on after the end of this holiday season - when I'm done working as a seasonal office assistant for Greenberg Smoked Turkeys which is my "survival" job) and after I have passed my exam.. which I hope I do this time.

  4. #224
    Default
    Maybe that's not something that's being made clear - this is a field where your hard work and dedication actually make a significant difference in your achievements - all you have to do is get your foot in the door, and you'll quickly be where you want to be if you really show that you're a worthy employee, in general. Employers need to trust you as a person as much as they trust your skills. They require years of experience because recruiting coders and assimilating them is a time-consuming, expensive process - the expertise is important, but in this economy, 2 years experience = "I know what I'm in for, and I've worked hard and kept my skills current, for an amount of time that requires serious commitment and strong work ethic. I'm not going to be overwhelmed, and I'm not going to quit within a short amount of time."

    It's really not fair, since there are a lot of people in positions that you've all worked hard to aspire to, who don't have nearly the knowledge or skills that you do, or because you've never gotten to really sharpen your skills after the exam was over; it's the same problem thousands of college grads are dealng with in other fields: you can't prove your dedication without some kind of track record within the field (unless you're one hell of a salesman). Without being able to prove your dedication, you'll never get to make a track record. It's an awful catch-22, but there is a way out.

    Temp agencies that can get you a permanent gig answering phones in a clinic are a great resource. It may take a couple of months, but eventually your employer is going to tap into your real market value, if they have any business sense. If they need another coder, what will they do? Search for an outside stranger to code, or promote the receptionist with a CPC, and hire a new receptionist? You can speed up the process, even without a temp job, if you can manage it, by searching for unpaid internships. Mention it at every job interview that's not for an actual coding job, but is somewhere that you could intern as a coder on the side. Talk about it on your resume. If you're already in the right environment, and things aren't happening for you like you'd hoped, ask around until you find someone who would let you tag along and learn from them (or maybe teach them), in your spare time.

    If you're stuck in neutral, sometimes begging for internships (even unpaid ones), is they only way to get your name out there, and prove your dedication without years of on the job history to provide. Unlike your collegiate counterparts who can't find jobs with Master's degrees, your required time on the bottom is very much in your hands. I hope success finds you all, soon!

  5. Default
    Great to know that those of us "newbies" who put everything we had into learning a trade, which we believed would lead to a career in our future are sadly misguided. If you want a job in this field it looks as though you may need to move to India!!

  6. #226
    Default
    I am actually not opposed to moving to India or any country, preferably, England that will hire me. Please if anyone knows how to apply for coding jobs in other country...? let me know.

  7. #227
    Location
    Clearwater and St. Petersburg
    Posts
    4
    Default
    ttsaunders1, have you tried looking for something in insurance verifications or authorizations? That's how I got started right out of school. I was actually hired by the company I did my externship with. You can at least get your foot in the door somewhere.

  8. Default
    Hello, this is the first time I've posted, but I really wanted to chime in here. I wish this thread was more positive. I've read through alot of it, and agree with those that say you have to start at the bottom and work your way up. I'm in school now for HIM and Coding and although it took me a long time, I kept sending my resume out everywhere, and I finally got my foot in the door in a medical billing office doing administrative work part-time. Persistence is really the key...you can't give up hope. Everyone has to start somewhere. This is a career change for me, as I used to be a paralegal. I knew I would have to start in an entry level position, and learn the ropes of working in a medical office. I know if I stay positive, am there every day, do a good job, and take on as much new responsibility possible, eventually something will open up and I will offered a promotion. I know this won't happen overnight, and if for some reason I can't move forward at this company, at least I will be getting experience here and use it elsewhere. Anyhow, I hope we can try to turn this thread around and get rid of the negativity and replace it with tips and advice to get new people motivated and working.

  9. #229
    Thumbs up
    Quote Originally Posted by shoegirl06 View Post
    Hello, this is the first time I've posted, but I really wanted to chime in here. I wish this thread was more positive. I've read through alot of it, and agree with those that say you have to start at the bottom and work your way up. I'm in school now for HIM and Coding and although it took me a long time, I kept sending my resume out everywhere, and I finally got my foot in the door in a medical billing office doing administrative work part-time. Persistence is really the key...you can't give up hope. Everyone has to start somewhere. This is a career change for me, as I used to be a paralegal. I knew I would have to start in an entry level position, and learn the ropes of working in a medical office. I know if I stay positive, am there every day, do a good job, and take on as much new responsibility possible, eventually something will open up and I will offered a promotion. I know this won't happen overnight, and if for some reason I can't move forward at this company, at least I will be getting experience here and use it elsewhere. Anyhow, I hope we can try to turn this thread around and get rid of the negativity and replace it with tips and advice to get new people motivated and working.
    Exactly! I was cleaning houses 3 years ago, and now I'm in charge of ICD-10 implementation for our entre company - we manage over 100 providers...you've just got to put the effort in and take every opportunity you get! If I can do it, anybody can!

  10. #230
    Default
    Thanks for the VA Hospital tip Kelly...I'll try it!

    Yvonne Blackwell, CPC-A

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