Results 1 to 6 of 6

291.81 and 303.91

  1. Default 291.81 and 303.91
    Medical Coding Books
    Dx for Axis I: Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol withdrawal
    Can I use 291.81 and 303.91?

    291.81 has an "excludes" note and 303 has "add an additional code" note, which is making my decision very difficult.

    I found this note online:
    Excludes: An excludes note under a code indicates that the terms excluded
    from the code are to be coded elsewhere. In some cases the codes
    for the excluded terms should not be used in conjunction with the
    code from which it is excluded. An example of this is a congenital
    condition excluded from an acquired form of the same condition.
    The congenital and acquired codes should not be used together. In
    other cases, the excluded terms may be used together with an
    excluded code. An example of this is when fractures of different
    bones are coded to different codes. Both codes may be used
    together if both types of fractures are present.

    How do I know when to code both codes and when not to code them both?
    Please HELP!
    Jessica Martinez, CCS, CPC

  2. #2
    Default
    I do not see anything in ICD 9 about billing these 2 codes together, so I don't see why you can't.

  3. Default
    My confusion is because of the excludes note under main category 291
    EXCLUDES: alcoholism without psychosis (303.0-303.9)
    And since the other code is 303.91

    I'm just not sure how to interpreter the “excludes” notes. Does it mean that when a code is part of the “excludes” ones (like in this case) it can or it cannot be coded too.

    I really appreciate all the help! Thanks!
    Jessica Martinez, CCS, CPC

  4. Question
    I found this note online:
    Excludes: An excludes note under a code indicates that the terms excluded
    from the code are to be coded elsewhere. In some cases the codes
    for the excluded terms should not be used in conjunction with the
    code from which it is excluded. An example of this is a congenital
    condition excluded from an acquired form of the same condition.
    The congenital and acquired codes should not be used together.
    In
    other cases, the excluded terms may be used together with an
    excluded code. An example of this is when fractures of different
    bones are coded to different codes. Both codes may be used
    together if both types of fractures are present.



    I'm relating this with the fact that a pt is having withdrawal symptoms due to drinking... so maybe the 303.91 is not necessary and this is the reason why is excluded... I don't know... I'm not sure.
    Jessica Martinez, CCS, CPC

  5. #5
    Default
    I have a book that I used to learn ICD9 coding in school and it has an example in it that leads me to think that you would code both of the above codes. 291 is saying that they are in withdrawl and 303 is saying that they are dependent on it

  6. Default
    Thank you so much for your input and your help!
    Jessica Martinez, CCS, CPC

Similar Threads

  1. Code 303.93
    By josevenedicto in forum Medical Coding General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-04-2013, 07:21 PM
  2. Would you still use 303.93
    By josevenedicto in forum Employment General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-04-2013, 09:33 AM
  3. 291 Alcohol Induced Mental Disorder
    By rmarti7770 in forum Diagnosis Coding
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-12-2010, 08:23 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Enjoying Our Forums?

AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals.

Join Now Continue Reading Without Full Access

Already a Member?

Login

Close Message

In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to:

  • Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world.
  • Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world.
  • Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare.
  • Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences.
  • Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members also have opportunities to save on heath, life, and liability insurance.
  • Become a member of a local chapter and attend regular meetings.