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US Federal Government jobs

  1. Default US Federal Government jobs
    Medical Coding Books
    I'm looking for input regarding working for any of the US Federal Government agencies that employ coders (Army, Navy, Air Force, Veterans Affairs, NHS etc). My main interests lie in the overall morale of the agency, tuition reimbursement opportunities, continuing education available, career advancement etc. I've been with the Army as a civilian coder for several years, and they seem to be very disinterested in helping you move up the career ladder. The benefits are great so I'm leary to leave the federal service, but I don't want to limit my career potential with an agency that doesn't seem to care about their employees.

  2. Default
    I am in the same boat, I am a federal employee and I feel stagnant. Since the benefits are good, and employment stable, people never leave. Which leaves little room for advancement and is actually why I am considering returning to private sector.

    I also feel that I do not have the personality and mind set for long term federal employment.

  3. Default
    You will never get close to the same pay in private as you are getting in federal. Be wise before you quite your job.

  4. #4
    Default
    I had been curious about exactly this issue with government employers...The benefits seem hard to beat, but I was afraid that it would be a crappy work environment. (I actually worry about running into that with most places...I've kinda gotten spoiled with my current employer)


    So it's about what I'm expecting, then? Does the pay at least make up for it?

  5. Default federal employment
    I have been trying to get in for years I had a 3 panel interview and it was a disaster. Now I am trying to get in under claims assistant any tips really need the job it is hard to find one that pays that well with benefits.

  6. #6
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by biller4u View Post
    I have been trying to get in for years I had a 3 panel interview and it was a disaster. Now I am trying to get in under claims assistant any tips really need the job it is hard to find one that pays that well with benefits.
    3 panel? Ouch! I feel your pain! I've got awful stage fright, and I'm sure I'd choke up and sound like a complete idiot if I were in your shoes - if I didn't hyperventilate! I can't give you any pointers on getting a govt. job, but I can offer a few on getting a job in claims follow up, since that's where I got my start...Some are common sense, but it helps to be reminded sometimes...

    -Know exactly how you are qualified for the position. This is especially important if you've never worked in claims before. It's a unique environment, and if you're not cut out for it...
    Turnover's pretty high at times, so you need to convey that you know what the job is, and all of the skills that you can bring to the table, to do that job.
    I'm not sure about the job you're going for, but our claims reps have 2 main goals - figure out why claims haven't been paid yet, and figure out why other claims didn't pay what we expected them to. That may sound simple enough, but when you consider how much time and effort goes into getting a claim processed and paid, there are a lot of things that can go awry. We would consider someone a good candidate for claims if:
    -They are problem solvers who know how to find the answers they need, with minimal direction.
    -They are persistant, and willing to get to the bottom of an issue that doesn't make sense, or has a difficult solution.
    -They don't mind being on the phone - a LOT. Excellent phone-communication skills are a must. Claims reps can't be easily intimidated by payer reps, or they'll hardly ever get anything paid. If you've ever argued with anyone on the phone about anything (one of your personal bills or customer service experiences), and got what you wanted, you can handle dealing with claims reps.
    -Good written communication skills are also important, if you'll be writing appeals. If that's a skill you have, then make sure to mention it!
    -Many claims reps aren't certified coders, but it's a HUGE advantage. Payers can't hoodwink you about why something denied by citing non-existent coding rules, because you actually know what you're talking about when you say that the claim was billed correctly. And if you can spot coding errors without having to spend 30 minutes or more on the phone, you can be much more productive.
    -Being really detail-oriented is also a must.

    You can probably land a coding-gig once you get your foot in the door in claims, if the govt. operates like other places, but you might find that you actually like claims. Good luck!

  7. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mvant923 View Post
    You will never get close to the same pay in private as you are getting in federal. Be wise before you quite your job.
    This is not always the case, the news always likes to report how much more federal workers get than their private counterparts and I can guarantee you, I was NOT making more than the private. I have just accepted a job in private again with better pay and benefits.

  8. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by btadlock1 View Post
    I had been curious about exactly this issue with government employers...The benefits seem hard to beat, but I was afraid that it would be a crappy work environment. (I actually worry about running into that with most places...I've kinda gotten spoiled with my current employer)


    So it's about what I'm expecting, then? Does the pay at least make up for it?
    The benefits are NOT great, they may be better than some small clinics, but a large hospital organization usually has WAY better benefits than the government. I pay a lot more in premiums than I ever did when I was private.

    Plus, the environment is not great, they are set in their ways which is very inefficient, not open to change or new ideas. I had to leave because it was crushing my spirit.

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    It's not that I'm looking to go back into the private side. I'm just looking for differences between all the federal services. Army vs Navy vs IHS vs etc...

    It took me probably about 3 years to get in, with applying to about 6 different coding jobs until I finally got in. That's part of the reason I don't want to leave.

    While the medical benefits may be a tad higher in premiums (in my case) the days off can't be beat! In a large metro city the pay isn't much different, in a more rural area the pay is higher, at least in my experience.

    If anyone currently or in the past has worked for the fed gov't service, feel free to private message me as I would like to hear about different sectors of the government. If you're like me, you don't want to write anything specific in the event someone you work with reads it. Thanks again!

  10. Default
    I sent you a message

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