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Thread: Accidental Needle Stick

  1. #1

    Default Accidental Needle Stick

    Does anyone know what other icd-9 codes are needed with E920.5, hypodermic needle stick, using this for healthcare worker that got accidentally stuck, now testing for HIV as precaution. The code book mentions usng this as an additional code, but not sure what should be the primary code. Please help.

  2. #2

    Thumbs up

    I believe the type of injury itself (cut,wound..) would be the primary code. E codes are used for additional information regarding where and how the injury occured. Hope this helps!

  3. #3

    Default

    You would use the v1585 (exposure to body fluids).

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ilvchopin View Post
    Does anyone know what other icd-9 codes are needed with E920.5, hypodermic needle stick, using this for healthcare worker that got accidentally stuck, now testing for HIV as precaution. The code book mentions usng this as an additional code, but not sure what should be the primary code. Please help.
    Assuming they were stuck in the hand or finger, you would use either 882.0 ir 882.3 primary with the E code secondary.
    Arlene J. Smith, CPC, CEMC, COBGC
    AAPC Tacoma WA Chapter

    President 2015
    Past-President 2013 and 2011
    President-Elect 2010
    Member Relations 2008
    AAPC NAB 2007-2009

  5. #5

    Default

    Now I'm curious, we've always coded V15.85 along with the E code for needle stick. Wondering how many others use the open wound codes as the primary dx?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjohnson View Post
    Now I'm curious, we've always coded V15.85 along with the E code for needle stick. Wondering how many others use the open wound codes as the primary dx?
    I think because there was an injury that led to the need to test, it just makes sense to have the injury code, the E code and then the V code for a complete explanation of the circumstances.
    Arlene J. Smith, CPC, CEMC, COBGC
    AAPC Tacoma WA Chapter

    President 2015
    Past-President 2013 and 2011
    President-Elect 2010
    Member Relations 2008
    AAPC NAB 2007-2009

  7. #7
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    We are having the same problem. What if the patient wasn't puntured with the needle or isn't sure if it went through, how would you code this ? For example sometimes they might get a prick but when they removed their gloves there is no blood or wound but as metioned above the run test and are seen in the ER as a precaution. I have always used 959.5 because i was told if the needle didn't puncture the skin then you cannot code an open wound. I'm curious as to what others are using as well. Thanks

  8. #8
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    You are correct it is not appropriate to use a code for an open wound for a puncture wound. therfore barring any code for puncture wound the 959.5 would be the first listed. Unless it is documented that there has been exposure to body fluids do not use the V15.85. Use screening V codes for the tests.

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  9. #9
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    We dont use the V15.85 code either, only the 959.5 with the E code. We use the V15.85 if while drawing blood it gets on their skin or if a patient spits on them etc...
    Thanks

  10. #10

    Default Needle stick

    One might consider using the 'V' exposure code if only laboratory testing for communicable diseases. If treating the puncture, one might consider using the open wound depending on depth. If only an abrasion, that could be used to. You would have exposure to diseases even if you don't actively see 'fluids' in a puncture if the skin is broken.

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