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Not worth the money put into CPC

  1. #11
    Default
    Medical Coding Books
    The CPC is not a waste of money, IF you know what you are doing in the first place. I have to say this, but I hate people who whine saying 'oh its soo hard' and i applaud you in realizing this might not be for you. But to say that its a waste of money well I think a lot of people would agree that you need to be fully prepared before taking and making the investment. I have seen people going back for the 3,4,5,6th times. That is a waste of money especially since they are not giving time between.

    My suggestion is get the study guides and bone up BEFORE even setting up to take the exam. If you get frustrated with the study guides that might be a good indicator not to take the exam yet. Also get some experience. I have talked to people who have gone to take the exam multiple times and all I hear is 'Yea just finished my course at this college and figured I am prepared to ace this exam'.

    The exam is hard, but if it was easy well our credentials wouldn't mean squat. After looking up the requirements and everything for the CCS, I think thats a waste of time and money since they seem to pass anyone and everyone. Take good notes in your book do the study guides and go for it.

    And an FYI before you even cry about how many times I took the exam. I took my exam once and passed it, this was after dealing with two outdated study guides and using my experience.

  2. #12
    Default Thank you Teresa!
    Quote Originally Posted by Teresa Collins View Post
    I have to agree with Roxanne. You must know the guidelines and where to look in the books for the answers. However, I did not write anything in any of my books, added no tabs, etc. and passed the exam on the first try in 2006.

    I think an important part of becoming a Certified Coder is in knowing that this is what you want to do......that this is "your field". Working as a Certified Coder and/or medical insurance biller is not for everyone. It is not something to go into because a friend suggested it to you or you find that some Certified Coders make lots of money.

    I think being a Certified Professional Coder is not "what you do", it is a part of "who you are".

    Before spending the money/taking the exam, look deep inside yourself and know without a doubt that this is what you want.....that this is "who you are". If you decide that it is, then study hard (I used the AAPC study guide and read CPT, ICD-9 and HCPS) and you'll do just fine.

    I hope someone finds this information to be beneficial to them.

    Respectfully,
    I agree so much w/ Teresa! I eat, breath, and live coding. I'm seeking to obtain at least...two specialty certifications within the next few years, even though my company doesn't require it. If I'm at work I'm coding, if I'm at home I'm reading about coding or studying. I've been certified since 2006, and there is always something to learn. If you don’t like the idea that once you get in this field, you are always a student, then this may not be for you.
    I personally love it, I ended up doing this by accident. I wanted to go into nursing, but that fell through. As coders we are just as responsible for our education as an RN is. For those that enjoy it and say "Bring it On!" these are the type of people who do well in this field. There are coders out there who hate the educational pieces and they typically make in the lower ranges of salary.
    I don't want to come off in a bad way but I'm kind of tired of the few people who get on here and complain all the time about what a waste of time, money etc. this field is.
    I know it's frustrating in this economy, and the tests are hard/difficult they are suppose to be, we have to prove to a physician, that we know enough to make them money and keep them compliant. I don't know too many MD's that trust easily when it comes to protecting them (my experiance, maybe not yours), and the better educated you are the more they will trust you with their compliance. Our physicians and practioners are the ones who could suffer the most if we are not knowledgeable.
    Last edited by nrichard; 09-23-2011 at 02:12 PM.

  3. Smile practice, practice, practice
    What really helped me are practice tests and practice questions. I purchased the aapc practice tests and took them a few times. I'd print them out and carve out a day and take a test. It gives you a frame of reference of how long you may take on the big test! I also just just printed out some from the internet just for the practice. Good Luck!

  4. #14
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by nrichard View Post
    I agree so much w/ Teresa! I eat, breath, and live coding. I'm seeking to obtain at least...two specialty certifications within the next few years, even though my company doesn't require it. If I'm at work I'm coding, if I'm at home I'm reading about coding or studying. I've been certified since 2006, and there is always something to learn. If you don't like the idea that once you get in this field, you are always a student, then this may not be for you.
    I personally love it, I ended up doing this by accident. I wanted to go into nursing, but that fell through. As coders we are just as responsible for our education as an RN is. For those that enjoy it and say "Bring it On!" these are the type of people who do well in this field. There are coders out there who hate the educational pieces and they typically make in the lower ranges of salary.
    I don't want to come off in a bad way but I'm kind of tired of the few people who get on here and complain all the time about what a waste of time, money etc. this field is.
    I know it's frustrating in this economy, and the tests are hard/difficult they are suppose to be, we have to prove to a physician, that we know enough to make them money and keep them compliant. I don't know too many MD's that trust easily when it comes to protecting them (my experiance, maybe not yours), and the better educated you are the more they will trust you with their compliance. Our physicians and practioners are the ones who could suffer the most if we are not knowledgeable.
    WOW~~I think you spoke for so many of us with you saying the above.....
    Yolanda T. Haskins CPC, CRC, OHCC, AAPC Fellow
    Past AAPCCA Board of Directors 2014 - 2017


    Alexandria, VA Chapter

    ~ Practice Kindness ~

  5. Angry Didn't pass the second time
    I really wanted to pass both the times I took the exam. I do not have the medical background that most everyone else has. I took a six month medical coding course taught by a certified instructor. I had my books marked up, and tabbed. I started with the easy ones, and did all of the AAPC test preps online. The time factor was the killer. Should I try for a third time?

  6. #16
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Posts
    886
    Default
    ..Putting myself on the line here to followup on this thread. Julia, like you I had no background whatsoever in the medical field. I was a retired music teacher. Due to reasons unexplained in this thread, found myself back in college as a student at the age of 57 immersed into an intensive year of study. I found it completely intriguing. Graduated at the top of my class, and studied thoughtfully and carefully for the CPC exam and FAILED the first time! Yes, I was a little shaken, but immediately signed on for a re-take and passed. The reason I tell you this is because IF you love coding and IF you are willing to patiently work your way up the ladder and start in an unrelated area to get your foot in the door, then you have your answer. If you do not enjoy it and the ongoing challenges it will continue to provide, then you also have your answer. ---Suzanne E. Byrum CPC

  7. Default
    It would seem that if a little more time were allotted to the coding exam, a larger percentage would pass. It's more about getting the correct result afterall. Perhaps AAPC should rethink the time frame and make adjustments since so many seem to experience this as the ultimate reason for failure. Would another 15 minutes or so have made a difference with some of you who failed? For me, I have text anxiety, BAD, as I'm sure others do and with the timer ticking loudly in my head, it's very difficult to focus on getting the right answers. To those of you who passed, that's excellent and kudos to you. For those who failed, I say don't give up, but before you take the test again, give yourself time to better prepare. Just my 2 cents.

  8. #18
    Default Test
    How many of you that have taken the test had training on line vs in the class room? I just wonder if one is better than the other for preparing for the exam.

  9. Default passing test
    I have to agree with Juliabiz, I took the test AGAIN and failed AGAIN. I did worse this time. I really thought I would do better...It is getting real frustrating. I study and took the practice test on the website...really thought I was going to do better. I really like this field, but I am starting to question myself.

  10. Default I agree
    I have been billing for 12 years in many different specialties and I took this test twice and also did very poorly...I agree 100% not worth the time. See, being a biller we know what the insurance companies are looking for to get payment, but as a "Coder" we have to forget that we are not worried about the payment. Does that make since? You can get your Billing Certification online. The title is Medical Billing Remiembursement Specialist. Its much like AAPC where you have to pay annually and have so many CEU's. If your looking to work for Physicians, get the Billing Certification and it is a national cerification.

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