Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 70

Whinning new coders? I was shocked.

  1. #31
    Default
    Medical Coding Books
    I have just finished reading all the posts on this thread. At first, I was feeling a little hot headed and beyond offended and wanted to vent; then I decided to read everything before making this post. I have calmed down and see where the venting and name calling were misunderstood. To all the professional coders, please accept my misguided apology for almost blowing up. To the newly certified and unemployed coders, please read on.

    I am a CPC-A (just passed the exam in November) and I did my research on the types of work that are available for a medical facility. The school I am attending right now has a wonderful instructor that has wholeheartedly expressed "take any job you can get in a medical facility". I have listened to her and I am currently interning as at the local hospital in reception. I have talked to my supervisor and she has arranged for me to visit the coding departments (the hospital and clinic are one facility but currently code separtly) and I have found that many of the people are not certified, only 3 are certified (in the hospital part). I was embarrassed to even say I was certified; some of the women have been working there for 10+ years and I got the feeling that my bragging would make them uncomfortable.

    I have learned that the only people you need to impress with your certification is yourself (for all the effort and hard work you have applied), your family (to prove that you can do it and encourage the younger ones that an education is important), and your future employer (because they pay you).

    What I wanted to say to my newly credentialed peers, take the reception position, medical records position, or switchboard operator position. I have had the opportunity to shadow fellow coders and enjoyed it. I was allowed to read the progress reports and physically code the case as far as I could (documentation needed clarification). I have learned that the few cases I have had the opportunity to work on actually built a network of possible leads. The one lady I shadowed actually asked if I could shadow her again before my internship ends and stated that I was really good with the cases I worked on. I am hoping that her compliment and my dedication for wanting to learn more than reception will land me a position somewhere in the hospital.

    As for the experience I am gaining, I can tell all the people who are wanting a coding position, but don't know the insurance part, learn the insurance guidelines. Working in the reception area I have learned that the insurance, especially Medicare/Medicaid, are very particular on their payments. The women I work with carry around 3" binders packed full with the rules/guidelines of each insurance company. The rules are always changing and that is thier "bible" when it comes to the various insurance companies. Only being on the job for 2 months, I have not even begun to understand all of it, but I can say that insurance guidelines are very important for more than just reception, the coders have to know the insurance guidelines to code the case properly.

    Good luck with your ventures. I hope your journeys lead you to your dream job.

  2. #32
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mksilvestre View Post
    I have just finished reading all the posts on this thread. At first, I was feeling a little hot headed and beyond offended and wanted to vent; then I decided to read everything before making this post. I have calmed down and see where the venting and name calling were misunderstood. To all the professional coders, please accept my misguided apology for almost blowing up. To the newly certified and unemployed coders, please read on.

    I am a CPC-A (just passed the exam in November) and I did my research on the types of work that are available for a medical facility. The school I am attending right now has a wonderful instructor that has wholeheartedly expressed "take any job you can get in a medical facility". I have listened to her and I am currently interning as at the local hospital in reception. I have talked to my supervisor and she has arranged for me to visit the coding departments (the hospital and clinic are one facility but currently code separtly) and I have found that many of the people are not certified, only 3 are certified (in the hospital part). I was embarrassed to even say I was certified; some of the women have been working there for 10+ years and I got the feeling that my bragging would make them uncomfortable.

    I have learned that the only people you need to impress with your certification is yourself (for all the effort and hard work you have applied), your family (to prove that you can do it and encourage the younger ones that an education is important), and your future employer (because they pay you).

    What I wanted to say to my newly credentialed peers, take the reception position, medical records position, or switchboard operator position. I have had the opportunity to shadow fellow coders and enjoyed it. I was allowed to read the progress reports and physically code the case as far as I could (documentation needed clarification). I have learned that the few cases I have had the opportunity to work on actually built a network of possible leads. The one lady I shadowed actually asked if I could shadow her again before my internship ends and stated that I was really good with the cases I worked on. I am hoping that her compliment and my dedication for wanting to learn more than reception will land me a position somewhere in the hospital.

    As for the experience I am gaining, I can tell all the people who are wanting a coding position, but don't know the insurance part, learn the insurance guidelines. Working in the reception area I have learned that the insurance, especially Medicare/Medicaid, are very particular on their payments. The women I work with carry around 3" binders packed full with the rules/guidelines of each insurance company. The rules are always changing and that is thier "bible" when it comes to the various insurance companies. Only being on the job for 2 months, I have not even begun to understand all of it, but I can say that insurance guidelines are very important for more than just reception, the coders have to know the insurance guidelines to code the case properly.

    Good luck with your ventures. I hope your journeys lead you to your dream job.
    Excellent advice - I only have one comment to make; as someone who started out in the insurance side - following up on outstanding/denied claims...
    Don't worry about lugging around binders of information that you need to memorize...it's really not that scary!

    Most payers list everything you need to see online - you should just try to learn about the who the different payers are in your area, and figure out how to navigate their provider website. (The AAPC even has links to most of their pages! It's really awesome, if you've never seen it.)

    The policies and procedures change as often (if not more so), as the codes, themselves do. If you can show that you're familiar with them, and more importantly, where to find them - you'll be far better equipped to land a job. (Not guaranteed - just more likely)

  3. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by chelsey71 View Post
    I will just say "amen" to the other seasoned coders who have responded to this thread. It's not that we are slamming or putting down the new coders or CPC-A's, but there IS a tone of entitlement that appears in many of the threads that complain about the AAPC, schools, employers, and experienced coders.
    My experience started out as receptionist and appointment scheduler 21 years ago. By being willing and able to expand my job title and skills, I moved in to medical records, check in and check out, billing and collections assistant, and kept adding to my resume. None of the jobs were offered to me without my having to prove myself and continue learning.
    After a few years of training (where I was given the CPT or ICD-9 book and told to find the codes when they weren't nearly as easy to find as today), taking any and every seminar available to me on state, local, and national billing trends/issues, and being willing to ask questions from those who were 'bigger, meaner, and knew more than I did', I was in the position to be brought in by practices to audit, clean up billing/coding, and train staff (including doctors).
    There is so much more involved in the coding spectrum as has been brought up by previous posters!!! Being able to do data entry from a superbill is not a difficult job. Knowing what can/can't be billed according to statutes, training physicians/providers on new codes or problematic coding issues, and translating the codes in to reality is something that takes skills. Yes, you as a CPC-A have skills from a classroom and training, but that does not directly translate in to the office setting generally.
    Remember, life is hard and the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over, yet expecting a different result. Getting your foot in the door is a good thing and, yes, not every job you have the chance to interview for or possibly be hired is what you want, but treat it as an opportunity to grow!
    Having managed offices and handled hiring in the past, including mentoring students from schools in their externships, book learning isn't everything. There is so much more involved than the general canvassing of a class can teach you.
    We experienced coders aren't slamming you in the least, but we are looking at it from a different perspective of having slogged through the trenches, including doing stuff that you may consider beneath your skills set, but we realize that all the jobs out there just help you learn, grow, and add to your marketability/skills.
    *** Plus, I will agree with the previous poster and reiterate, PLEASE spell and grammar check your resume/cover letters! It's amazing how many I have thrown away due to hideous errors! If you can't take the time to make sure your initial written impression to the Hiring Manager is clean, how could they trust you to do the job correctly???? Also, appearance does make a difference. Dress a level or two higher than the standard day to day dress code when you go in to interview. Please, don't show up in scrubs for a coding interview. Having been in Las Vegas previously, I would also STRONGLY recommend that you NOT show up in full on hoochie attire or club wear. If the outfit is something you would wear out clubbing on the weekends, it's not medical office attire!

    Wow this is something. I just read what Pam had to say. I agree with the advice she has given the new coders! She is telling the way it is. I see it every day.
    Theresa CCS-P CPMA CCC ICDCT-CM

  4. #34
    Default Trying to get into the medical field
    Quote Originally Posted by mksilvestre View Post
    I have just finished reading all the posts on this thread. At first, I was feeling a little hot headed and beyond offended and wanted to vent; then I decided to read everything before making this post. I have calmed down and see where the venting and name calling were misunderstood. To all the professional coders, please accept my misguided apology for almost blowing up. To the newly certified and unemployed coders, please read on.

    I am a CPC-A (just passed the exam in November) and I did my research on the types of work that are available for a medical facility. The school I am attending right now has a wonderful instructor that has wholeheartedly expressed "take any job you can get in a medical facility". I have listened to her and I am currently interning as at the local hospital in reception. I have talked to my supervisor and she has arranged for me to visit the coding departments (the hospital and clinic are one facility but currently code separtly) and I have found that many of the people are not certified, only 3 are certified (in the hospital part). I was embarrassed to even say I was certified; some of the women have been working there for 10+ years and I got the feeling that my bragging would make them uncomfortable.

    I have learned that the only people you need to impress with your certification is yourself (for all the effort and hard work you have applied), your family (to prove that you can do it and encourage the younger ones that an education is important), and your future employer (because they pay you).

    What I wanted to say to my newly credentialed peers, take the reception position, medical records position, or switchboard operator position. I have had the opportunity to shadow fellow coders and enjoyed it. I was allowed to read the progress reports and physically code the case as far as I could (documentation needed clarification). I have learned that the few cases I have had the opportunity to work on actually built a network of possible leads. The one lady I shadowed actually asked if I could shadow her again before my internship ends and stated that I was really good with the cases I worked on. I am hoping that her compliment and my dedication for wanting to learn more than reception will land me a position somewhere in the hospital.

    As for the experience I am gaining, I can tell all the people who are wanting a coding position, but don't know the insurance part, learn the insurance guidelines. Working in the reception area I have learned that the insurance, especially Medicare/Medicaid, are very particular on their payments. The women I work with carry around 3" binders packed full with the rules/guidelines of each insurance company. The rules are always changing and that is thier "bible" when it comes to the various insurance companies. Only being on the job for 2 months, I have not even begun to understand all of it, but I can say that insurance guidelines are very important for more than just reception, the coders have to know the insurance guidelines to code the case properly.

    Good luck with your ventures. I hope your journeys lead you to your dream job.
    __________________________________________________ ________________________

    [QUOTE=Yesterday 09:47 PM
    chelsey71 I will just say "amen" to the other seasoned coders who have responded to this thread. It's not that we are slamming or putting down the new coders or CPC-A's, but there IS a tone of entitlement that appears in many of the threads that complain about the AAPC, schools, employers, and experienced coders.
    My experience started out as receptionist and appointment scheduler 21 years ago. By being willing and able to expand my job title and skills, I moved in to medical records, check in and check out, billing and collections assistant, and kept adding to my resume. None of the jobs were offered to me without my having to prove myself and continue learning.
    After a few years of training (where I was given the CPT or ICD-9 book and told to find the codes when they weren't nearly as easy to find as today), taking any and every seminar available to me on state, local, and national billing trends/issues, and being willing to ask questions from those who were 'bigger, meaner, and knew more than I did', I was in the position to be brought in by practices to audit, clean up billing/coding, and train staff (including doctors).
    There is so much more involved in the coding spectrum as has been brought up by previous posters!!! Being able to do data entry from a superbill is not a difficult job. Knowing what can/can't be billed according to statutes, training physicians/providers on new codes or problematic coding issues, and translating the codes in to reality is something that takes skills. Yes, you as a CPC-A have skills from a classroom and training, but that does not directly translate in to the office setting generally.
    Remember, life is hard and the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over, yet expecting a different result. Getting your foot in the door is a good thing and, yes, not every job you have the chance to interview for or possibly be hired is what you want, but treat it as an opportunity to grow!
    Having managed offices and handled hiring in the past, including mentoring students from schools in their externships, book learning isn't everything. There is so much more involved than the general canvassing of a class can teach you.
    We experienced coders aren't slamming you in the least, but we are looking at it from a different perspective of having slogged through the trenches, including doing stuff that you may consider beneath your skills set, but we realize that all the jobs out there just help you learn, grow, and add to your marketability/skills.
    *** Plus, I will agree with the previous poster and reiterate, PLEASE spell and grammar check your resume/cover letters! It's amazing how many I have thrown away due to hideous errors! If you can't take the time to make sure your initial written impression to the Hiring Manager is clean, how could they trust you to do the job correctly???? Also, appearance does make a difference. Dress a level or two higher than the standard day to day dress code when you go in to interview. Please, don't show up in scrubs for a coding interview. Having been in Las Vegas previously, I would also STRONGLY recommend that you NOT show up in full on hoochie attire or club wear. If the outfit is something you would wear out clubbing on the weekends, it's not medical office attire![/QUOTE]

    __________________________________________________ ________________________

    I thank everyone for the words of encouragement, but I am also unable to find any job in the medical field for the past 2 years...let alone a coding job. I have my CPC-A and my CHAA (also taken a Professional Medical Coding course, Medical Insurance Reimbursement, Patient Access Fundamentals, Medical Terminology, and Anatomy and Physiology I) . I do not have an extern program in my area. But I do need to work full time to survive and I am unable to move.
    I have no experience in the medical field. I do have office experience. I am willing to take any entry position to learn and get experience. I have applied for receptionist, customer service, billing, medical records, patient access representative, patient access specialist, unit secretary, clerk, etc.

    P.S. I do dress professionally, do not own hoochie attire, but I do appreciate the professional opinion.

  5. #35
    Location
    Dover Seacoast New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,970
    Default
    Well, Ms. Butler, although I respect your right to post on this public board, I'm dismayed that you took my posts out of context and went so far as to suggest that I have been less than professional on this site. I'm a big girl, and clearly understand that not everyone is going to love my no-nonsense approach, but if you want a sugar-coated answer, you'd better head for the bakery. I did go back to the threads that you referenced, read through them all in regards to their full content, and I wouldn't retract a single one. I stand by my comments, my opinions and the manner in which they were intended. If you choose to take it personally, that's your prerogative.
    I think that if you dig deeper into the origin of my posts, you will find that my responses are warranted. Although I've noted recent improvements, there was a period of time over a year ago where every third post was a litany of complaints, finger-pointing, and yes, whining about the inability to get coding jobs. As a hiring manager, I know what gets people hired, and have tried to share that on this board, with encouragement, suggestions and the occasional plea to stop the pointless pity parties. I'm not the only hiring manager who was fed up with the entitlement felt by some of the new coders when jobs didn't just come raining down like manna from the sky. The posts were so negative and frustrating to read; they detracted from the purpose of the board, and because I am a writer as well as a coder, I felt obligated to respond. This is a tough field….if you're offended by any of this-- heaven help you if you have to ever go toe-to-toe with a thoracic surgeon. Those docs will eat you alive!
    Be shocked if you must, but frankly your attempt to discredit the advice and comments of the many, many successful experienced senior coders on this board who have taken time out of their day to offer a reality check, was probably not a very well-thought out career move.
    In case you're wondering…I will continue to contribute to this board.
    Pam Brooks, MHA, COC, PCS, CPC, AAPC Fellow
    Coding Manager
    Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
    Dover, NH 03820

    If you can dream it, you can do it. Walt Disney

  6. #36
    Location
    Charleston, South Carolina
    Posts
    641
    Default
    Great response Pam, good for you!!!

    To Ms Butler and all the other negative commenters to this post, I ask, do you really think that the experienced/senior coders began their career in the upper level position they are in now? Do you really think that we made great money right out of school? Do you really think that we did not "earn" our way the hard way, ie by starting at the bottom, just like we suggest to newbies? Reality check, WE DID NOT!! When most of the more senior coders started in this field, coding really was not yet the profession it is today. I would bet lots of money that most of us (like me) started out (maybe with some college) as a medical secretary, unit clerk or another related position, and we grew from there. We grew because we showed, and continue to show, initiative, love for what we do, hard work and a willingness to learn and research, and most of all we had a respect for those that came first and were willing to teach/work with us!!!

    I don't want to start another barage of negative comments, but newbies can learn alot from some of the experienced coders on this forum. Instead of acting like you are entitled (if the shoe fits), listen to what these people tell you and/or suggest. We have been there, done that, and earned our stripes. We do not think we are better than you, we are not condesending, but we have been in this field for a long time, are hiring managers, and know what hiring managers are looking for.

    Everytime I receive a resume, I look first at the typical things, spelling, grammer, your email avitar, education and experience, etc. Then I check the forums. If the applicant is on the forums, I most times learn a lot about that person by reading their comments/posts. If someone is griping and being negative on the forums, how do you think they will act in the position???? You do not want to bite the hand that feeds you.

    If you did not do your research on hiring practices, coder staff needs, etc, and can not find a job, DO NOT blame senior coders on this site, or any other site. Most of us will give a helping hand to a newbie if we can. With that said, a lot of us are not in that position, what with HR and practice/facility guidelines.

    Again, great post Pam. Newbies, please read and take to heart the suggestions senior coders offer, it may just get you a job!!

    Respectfully,

    I would like to add that many experienced/senior coders have offered advice many, many times, only to basically be trashed by many newbies not liking our suggestions on finding employment and other advice. This becomes very disheartening and made me wonder why we bother?? Many of us would like to help newbies, but who wants to continuously be trashed for offering help? You may not like our suggestions, but again, we are in the real world and know what works and what doesn't. No, I'm not saying we know it all, but think about the advice given before jumping all over the poster. Maybe then more senior coders were step up to the plate and offer assistance more often.
    Last edited by mmorningstarcpc; 12-29-2011 at 08:09 AM.
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  7. #37
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,126
    Default
    I, too, must come to Pam's defense. I have always found Pam to be very professional and extremely helpful. To single out one particular person is, in my opinion, "slamming" someone. While I understand your situation, there are hundreds of other professions that experience the same issues. Coding is not an isolated profession. There are thousands of people out of a job as we speak! Not to suggest you're not or haven't but in this day of time, one needs to become savvy, tenacious and literally reinvent themselves.

    Something else to keep in mind....

    In light of RAC and the MIC's, compliance is at an all time high. While I understand that you worked very hard for your certification, experience IS highly valued since physicians are being scrutinized more so than ever. Billions of dollars are being recouped due to inproper coding. "Seasoned" coders should have caught some of these errors. Do you know how many post's we see regarding "new versus establish" patient's??? This is coding 101; yet, RAC is recouping millions of dollars just on this very issue!

    I do wish you the very best on your quest but please be mindful and considerate of your posts. We're only here to help...
    Last edited by RebeccaWoodward*; 12-29-2011 at 08:37 AM.

  8. #38
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    534
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by BJanePla View Post
    The point is when you are fresh out of school, you are "fresh" in your mind and know your stuff. Billing in a doctors office is not that hard as the doctors circle the codes for the biller to send out bills & file insurance. Many of us are VERY experienced in other areas,
    and I would say, me personnaly have TRANSFERRED skills. I started out at age 18 with a job as a full time Bookkeeper (out of school in 65). I was up to years ago an
    Executive Assistant & Administrative Assistant; before I got laid off and worked as a ceritfied HUC/Unit Secretary where I also had to know a lot about Medical Records and some coding...then I went back to school to study MBC at Erwin Voct Tech for 11 months, and now a CPC-A and cannot find any kind of work. Just because you all are coders now, doesn't mean you can take shorthand, do bookkeeping, PowerPoint, write software programs, be a major fundraiser, many of us are very skilled in other areas and have become retrained for MBC. Hospitals use CSS and start one out in the ER or OP, and you have to work at that for a few years. I know my doctors Medical Biller very well, and she is not certified, and just bills what the doctor circles! Gee how hard can that be! I also was an Account Clerk AR in the past. I would think doctors would want to hire "fresh" brains, not someone who does not keep up with changes. I also have an AA & AS degree in Business and 30 hours in HIM. As I said many of us do have experience, but not in coding! Being a Unit Secretary for several years I had to know all aspects of medical records and doctors still don't count that as experience. You figure!

    See, this here is a problem. "Fresh brains"? You think coding is just taking the code the doctor circled and entering it into the sytem? You also think we don't keep up with "changes"?

    You state you know your doctors biller and she just enters what he circles. Well that could be the case of many of these offices and those like that aren't going to be hiring to replace someone who's doing it just because you are certified. You are also eventually going to see problems with that office when they get audited.

    I personally do coding and billing for a 13 doctor practice with 5 endoscopy suites. I do the billing for 4 of the endo suites and the doctors IP/OP charges and I'll tell you right now I hardly ever use the charge tickets the doctors give me because half the time they are wrong and don't match the note. Then I have to translate according to the payors rules.

    And as for changes and keeping up? You have to to stay certified. You also need to stay up to date with payor rules and contracts or you will code wrong and then get fired (for continually costing the practice revenue).

    So just because someone has a "fresh mind" doesn't mean they have the experience necessary to actually code and code right.

    Sure any one can sit at a computer and enter in numbers, but are you putting in the correct numbers? Heck I can go into the exam room and listen to a pt's heart beat and lungs and take their blood pressure and ask them to cough. Doesn't mean I'm an MA, nurse or doctor.

    Context people. We're here to help as much as we can, but it's tough all over and it's not getting easier yet. Yes, there are some schools out there that take advantage of the peoples fears (happened to me 5 years ago, but I did have medical office and managment experience) and you rush into something.

    I'm almost embarrassed to say my best friend, a doctor, gave me a small physicians coding guide written by one of the doctors associated with the AAPC when I left the medical office I used to be a coordinator for and I never knew there were certified coders. I got here to Charlotte and figured with my 5 years experience at a major northeast hospital outpatient center it would be no problem to find a position. I was wrong and got a call from a for-profit "college" saying you had to be certified at something to get a job here. I got scared, didn't do my homework or investigate and started with the "school". $8000.00. And then I found out I could've taken a course at the local community college for 1/4 of that or even online for less.

    So just because you have some experience in an office it may or may not help. The reason they want expereience is they need to maximize the revenue. Someone fresh out of school may know some things but they probably don't know the nuances of the payors the office is dealing with.

    And as another "new" coder pointed out, classroom coding is way different then real world coding.

    My two cents.

    I hope you all don't give up, I didn't. But like many have said be realistic. It took me 2 years to get back into the medical field once I got down here and I know that prospect scares you but for me it was worth it.

  9. #39
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,531
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Pam Brooks View Post
    Well, Ms. Butler, although I respect your right to post on this public board, I'm dismayed that you took my posts out of context and went so far as to suggest that I have been less than professional on this site. I'm a big girl, and clearly understand that not everyone is going to love my no-nonsense approach, but if you want a sugar-coated answer, you'd better head for the bakery. I did go back to the threads that you referenced, read through them all in regards to their full content, and I wouldn't retract a single one. I stand by my comments, my opinions and the manner in which they were intended. If you choose to take it personally, that's your prerogative.
    I think that if you dig deeper into the origin of my posts, you will find that my responses are warranted. Although I've noted recent improvements, there was a period of time over a year ago where every third post was a litany of complaints, finger-pointing, and yes, whining about the inability to get coding jobs. As a hiring manager, I know what gets people hired, and have tried to share that on this board, with encouragement, suggestions and the occasional plea to stop the pointless pity parties. I'm not the only hiring manager who was fed up with the entitlement felt by some of the new coders when jobs didn't just come raining down like manna from the sky. The posts were so negative and frustrating to read; they detracted from the purpose of the board, and because I am a writer as well as a coder, I felt obligated to respond. This is a tough field….if you're offended by any of this-- heaven help you if you have to ever go toe-to-toe with a thoracic surgeon. Those docs will eat you alive!
    Be shocked if you must, but frankly your attempt to discredit the advice and comments of the many, many successful experienced senior coders on this board who have taken time out of their day to offer a reality check, was probably not a very well-thought out career move.
    In case you're wondering…I will continue to contribute to this board.
    Good job! I love your style, and you have given some really great no nonsense advice. I had not read this thread before now and I was shocked to see the quotes taken out of context. This kind of thing should never be done, it is unprofessional and just downright rude! Pam is always professional and straightforward and never rude!!!
    Love you Pam!!! I would love to work with you anytime!

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  10. #40
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler View Post
    I thank everyone for the words of encouragement, but I am also unable to find any job in the medical field for the past 2 years...let alone a coding job. I have my CPC-A and my CHAA (also taken a Professional Medical Coding course, Medical Insurance Reimbursement, Patient Access Fundamentals, Medical Terminology, and Anatomy and Physiology I) . I do not have an extern program in my area. But I do need to work full time to survive and I am unable to move.
    I have no experience in the medical field. I do have office experience. I am willing to take any entry position to learn and get experience. I have applied for receptionist, customer service, billing, medical records, patient access representative, patient access specialist, unit secretary, clerk, etc.

    P.S. I do dress professionally, do not own hoochie attire, but I do appreciate the professional opinion.
    You may try asking for feedback next time you face rejection, to see what it is that the person that they hired has, that you may be missing. Also, read the career advice on Monster and Careerbuilder, and take it to heart. I heard a quote a long time ago (although I can't remember its origin):

    "If you always do what you've always done, things will always be the way they've always been."

    In other words, if what you're doing's not working, try something else - you have to be your own catalyst for change; forge your own path. I don't know you, or anything about you, so please don't take this as me 'being judgemental' - this applies to anyone who has experienced repeated failure in some venture of their lives, and is something I had to come to terms with, myself:

    Take a good, long, and honest look at yourself. It's hard to be completely objective, because quite honestly, it hurts - people are conditioned to overlook the negative, when it's hurtful; but good introspection requires it. I believe that if you really take an honest accounting of your personal attributes, you'll find some area to improve that will make a significant difference (everyone can - myself included).

    How is your attititude conveyed when you're speaking to prospective employers, from the moment you enter the office to submit an application (or your resume)?
    Are you excited about the potential opportunity, and greet everyone with a warm, friendly smile?
    Are you nervous and anxious - maybe you try to smile, but your heart's not quite in it?
    Do you go in with a feeling of crushing defeat weighing on you, perhaps already contemplating how you'll feel if you encounter the same end-result, again?


    If the last 2 are true for you, remember, that everyone around you can sense it. If you're pessimistic, or if you've got a chip on your shoulder, those negative emotions will seep out of you in countless ways - your facial expressions (even when they're only fleeting), your tone of voice, and your word choices - the things you choose to say, and what you choose to omit, speak volumes. Your body language will betray you every time. How's your posture? What about making good eye-contact?

    Do you exude the confidence that comes from someone who knows that they'll be good at the job, regardless of how little experience they have in the field or position?
    Do you seem happy? Like you're satisfied with your life, despite the bumps in the road you've had to deal with?
    Do you seem like someone who will be positive and upbeat, through the ups and downs that inevitably accompany any job?


    If you can't answer 'yes' to those questions, then you've got a lot of work to do, if you hope to land a job at a decent employer in the near future. Employers don't want people who are negative, or who might be detrimental to their other staff's morale, when the going gets tough. You'll turn them off from the moment you enter the room, if you are perceived in that manner. Think outside of the box, and approach your search from a new angle - look for different positions, at different places/specialties than you've been looking at. Anything could be the key.
    And when you do go in to fill out an app, or for an interview, don't just dress well and run your spell check - hold your head up high, smile at everyone you see, like you've already been given the job. Don't dwell on your failure; be grateful for what knowledge and experience you DO have (which, for you, is considerably more than many of your peers - don't detract from it, simply because it wasn't in a doctor's office - office experience is office experience, plain and simple), and sell the employer on how much you have to offer in any position, as well as how eager you are to learn more.

    You can either roll with the punches, or let them knock you down. Either way, attitude is everything for a good quality of life. Good luck to you all!
    Last edited by btadlock1; 12-29-2011 at 10:28 AM. Reason: grammar freak!

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-09-2012, 02:54 PM
  2. I had to share this great reference with new coders and multispecialty coders
    By nrichard in forum Employment General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-13-2011, 02:01 PM
  3. Certified coders/nurse coders needed
    By Noniwag in forum Job Postings
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-08-2011, 05:21 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Enjoying Our Forums?

AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals.

Join Now Continue Reading Without Full Access

Already a Member?

Login

Close Message

In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to:

  • Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world.
  • Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world.
  • Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare.
  • Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences.
  • Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members also have opportunities to save on heath, life, and liability insurance.
  • Become a member of a local chapter and attend regular meetings.