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Help! I have NO idea what I'm doing!

  1. #11
    Default
    Exam Training Packages
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchellde View Post
    The auditing and volunteering is on page 2 on my screen. you might try to convert to PDF if you can since most everyone can read PDF files. I use Apple so when I convert from word it does move things around a bit. However I find that when I convert everything to PDF , then everyone can open and read my files.
    Gotcha...I tried to upload in pdf, but for some reason, my less than one-page text file is huge when saved that way...I'll just paste it below for the non-Word users:

    Brandi Tadlock, CPC, CPC-P, CPMA, CPCO


    Healthcare Experience To-Date:

    UMC Physician Network Services (2007 – Present)
    (Multi-specialty practice management organization, with over 125 providers, in nearly 50 locations in West Texas)

    • Commercial Insurance Specialist (2007-2010)
    • Project Coordinator (2010-2011)
    • Coding & Compliance Analyst (2011 – Present)


    Accomplishments Include:
    • Drafted numerous successful appeals, and assisted with reimbursement issues stemming from patient plan benefits, and medical necessity denials; my appeals have twice directly-contributed to payers changing their scrubbing software's edits.
    • Identified and resolved many other payer contract and fee schedule issues, including a single instance of underpayments on E/M codes spanning a year-long timeframe, and resulting in a net repayment of over $10,000
    • I have become the 'go-to' person for complex coding and billing issues at PNS; since I understand the root(s) of the problems, and can nearly always find a way to resolve them.

    Additional Responsibilities Acquired:
    • Performed numerous audits for provider documentation integrity, and have supplied detailed reports on strength areas and opportunities for improvement; in the course of performing audits, I designed my own fillable audit tool, which I have distributed to auditors across the country, upon request.
    • Instructed a successful CPC certification-preparation class, where I developed my own curriculum.
    • Developed the ICD-10 Implementation plan being used by PNS, throughout the transition

    Extra-Curricular Activities:
    • Helped to coordinate numerous fundraisers within PNS, for organizations such as Children’s Miracle Network, Multiple Sclerosis, the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association (among others).
    Last edited by btadlock1; 12-27-2011 at 12:05 PM.

  2. #12
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchellde View Post
    I think it looks awesome! It reads much better and you look 4 times more professional in it. It definitely says more than entry level now. I would be interested in how others feel. But that is my opinion.
    Thanks!

  3. #13
    Default One last thing, here...
    Sorry to solicit so much advice on this, but as you could tell I need the assistance!

    Last but not least, the Cover Letter...This is one I've certainly never done, so anyone and everyone - please let me know if I'm on the right track with this, or if I need to go in a different direction. Once again, I'm clueless, and winging it. I'll just paste it to save time...

    Thanks so much!

    Greetings:

    Thank you for taking the time to review my attached resume, and for considering me for a position within your company.

    I realize that the duration of time that I've been in the healthcare industry is not extensive; however, the amount of knowledge and experience I've gained in a relatively short period, is considerably greater than one might expect, and it's my hope to continue to expand upon that, and grow further as professional in the field, by learning from the best in the business.

    I've got an insatiable curiosity; I find problem-solving highly enjoyable, and will investigate topics to an extreme degree, simply because I want to know something new. I realize that not everyone shares my passion in this capacity, so whenever I'm able, I provide a synopsis of what I've learned to my collegues, in an attempt to try to make others' jobs a little bit easier.

    An example of this comes from my time working with commercial claim appeals; whenever it became evident that a denial issue was the result of more than just a few isolated incidences, I would draft an appeal template for our entire billing office to use, when sending in corrected claims, as the problem was being resolved. For complex issues, I'd also include an educational handout, explaining as much as I could, regarding what I'd learned about the issue, and how things were supposed to work, in an attempt to provide them with the tools they'll need to perform their jobs more efficiently, and effectively.


    For example: Often times, a lipid panel code (CPT 80061) is billed in conjunction with an LDL lab code (83721), and when the latter code is billed without a 59 modifier, it will typically deny as "bundled" to the lipid panel. I drafted an appeal to accompany our corrected claims (when 83721 was appropriately rebilled with modifier 59); as well as a handout for our billing and follow-up staff, explaining [that:] the LDL cholesterol can be estimated in most cases, by using data derived from the results of the lipid panel, which is why the LDL isn't considered 'separately payable'; however, certain circumstances are known to compromise the data for the LDL's calculation (eg, when the patient's triglyceride levels are >400). During such instances, billing the 83721 in addition to 80061 is considered medically necessary, as long as it’s appended with the 59 modifier.

    I apply the same level of dedication, whether I'm performing a simple task or something with much more significance. To allow my name to be attached to sub-standard work would be simply unacceptable to me, under any circumstances.

    I'm confident in my ability to learn anything you're able to teach me, and accomplish any professional goal that you may set. I hope that you'll allow me to demonstrate my potential, by giving me the opportunity to redefine what a "top-performer" is, for you. Thanks again for your time.

    Signed,

    Brandi Tadlock, CPC, CPC-P, CPMA, CPCO

  4. #14
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by btadlock1 View Post
    Thanks!
    I too think your resume looks great! I also have to commend you on achieving so much in 4 years! That is awesome and shows your dedication to your career! Whenever you comment on a post it's very good sound/solid advice. I can see you in a teaching role too!

    You give a breath of fresh air to even a seasoned coder .

    I know you will be successful at landing just about any job you want, you've got the drive the knowledge and the credentials to back it up....

    It sounds to me like you are about ready to spread your wings and fly into a new venture....I wish you all the best of luck in your future endeavors Brandi!
    Roxanne Thames CPC, CPC-I, CEMC
    rthamescpci@gmail.com


    "Remember the greatest gift is not found in the store but in the heart of true friends"

  5. Default
    I have an awesome booklet on resume writing I can send to you as a PDF. It has Resume' and cover letter examples, etc. Just send me a private message with your e-mail address.

    Good luck to you.

  6. #16
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,560
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by btadlock1 View Post
    Sorry to solicit so much advice on this, but as you could tell I need the assistance!

    Last but not least, the Cover Letter...This is one I've certainly never done, so anyone and everyone - please let me know if I'm on the right track with this, or if I need to go in a different direction. Once again, I'm clueless, and winging it. I'll just paste it to save time...

    Thanks so much!

    Greetings:

    Thank you for taking the time to review my attached resume, and for considering me for a position within your company.

    I realize that the duration of time that I've been in the healthcare industry is not extensive; however, the amount of knowledge and experience I've gained in a relatively short period, is considerably greater than one might expect, and it's my hope to continue to expand upon that, and grow further as professional in the field, by learning from the best in the business.

    I've got an insatiable curiosity; I find problem-solving highly enjoyable, and will investigate topics to an extreme degree, simply because I want to know something new. I realize that not everyone shares my passion in this capacity, so whenever I'm able, I provide a synopsis of what I've learned to my collegues, in an attempt to try to make others' jobs a little bit easier.

    An example of this comes from my time working with commercial claim appeals; whenever it became evident that a denial issue was the result of more than just a few isolated incidences, I would draft an appeal template for our entire billing office to use, when sending in corrected claims, as the problem was being resolved. For complex issues, I'd also include an educational handout, explaining as much as I could, regarding what I'd learned about the issue, and how things were supposed to work, in an attempt to provide them with the tools they'll need to perform their jobs more efficiently, and effectively.


    For example: Often times, a lipid panel code (CPT 80061) is billed in conjunction with an LDL lab code (83721), and when the latter code is billed without a 59 modifier, it will typically deny as "bundled" to the lipid panel. I drafted an appeal to accompany our corrected claims (when 83721 was appropriately rebilled with modifier 59); as well as a handout for our billing and follow-up staff, explaining [that:] the LDL cholesterol can be estimated in most cases, by using data derived from the results of the lipid panel, which is why the LDL isn't considered 'separately payable'; however, certain circumstances are known to compromise the data for the LDL's calculation (eg, when the patient's triglyceride levels are >400). During such instances, billing the 83721 in addition to 80061 is considered medically necessary, as long as it's appended with the 59 modifier.

    I apply the same level of dedication, whether I'm performing a simple task or something with much more significance. To allow my name to be attached to sub-standard work would be simply unacceptable to me, under any circumstances.

    I'm confident in my ability to learn anything you're able to teach me, and accomplish any professional goal that you may set. I hope that you'll allow me to demonstrate my potential, by giving me the opportunity to redefine what a "top-performer" is, for you. Thanks again for your time.

    Signed,

    Brandi Tadlock, CPC, CPC-P, CPMA, CPCO
    Brandi,
    I would reword the second paragraph first line , you are apologizing for not being in the industry for a long time. This is not a good way to start off. First do not apologize and second there is no need to bring attention to the fact that you have only been working in the field for a short time.
    The first paragraph is one sentence, this is not good structure and you need more here, you should mention the position you are applying for and you should mention where you heard about the opening.
    You have a couple of paragraphs at the end that are also one sentence each and they are long sentences, see if you can combine these two as the thoughts are similar and get one good paragraph from them.
    That is what I see on first look
    good job though.

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  7. #17
    Location
    Swainsboro/Statesboro, GA
    Posts
    753
    Default
    Brandi,

    You are receiving very good advice here so I will not address that part, but I did want to let you know that my son was in "worse" resume and experience shape than you are and he got a great job!

    His only work experience was in summer during college; in high school he played sports so he did not work. It took him longer than average to finish college so between that length of time and his extremely limited work experience, his resume was tough to write! What we did was focus on his education, listing his certifications obtained while he was in college. We also listed community involvement.

    He applied for a ton of jobs - all online, and never got the first interview!

    What worked for him was AAPC! I have been very active in my local chapter for years, and I write our newsletter. During one period of time, I interviewed different members in the chapter. One of these members had told me how her company was expanding. When my son was looking for a job, I remembered this member and I emailed her to see if her company might have any IT positions. Luckily for my son, she asked for his resume and took it to HR. She also sent him the jobs link on their website and he applied for a couple of positions. He was called in for an interview within two weeks and he was hired - and even got a promotion before his first day! It's been six months now and he has received another promotion!

    Even though my son is not a coder, AAPC was key in him getting that interview! So I strongly encourage YOU to become active in your local chapter if you are not already!!

    Best of luck to you!
    Freda Brinson, CPC, CPC-H, CEMC
    2014 President AAPC Swainsboro, GA Chapter
    Past President - 2012, 2008; Past Vice President - 2013, Past Education Officer - 2009 of Savannah, GA Chapter
    Past Member AAPCCA Board of Directors (2009-2012)
    brinsonfr@sjchs.org

  8. #18
    Location
    Charleston, South Carolina
    Posts
    641
    Default
    Brandi,

    I think this looks great. I do have one small suggestion. Where you listed your job titles and the years, I have always been told to put most recent first. I know this kind of seems backwards as you started in position A, moved to B and then C most recent. Listing them as C, B, and A is what I have always heard recommended.

    Just my two cents!

    Good luck to you!!!

    Machelle
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  9. #19
    Default
    A few comments:

    On your resume you don't list any contact information. If your cover letter gets separated from your resume, a prospective employer might not take the time to find out how to contact you.

    Don't sell yourself short. You have accomplished a great deal in a short amount of time. I agree with mitchellde, don't apologize for the short time you've been in the healthcare field.

    Customize each cover letter for the specific position. If possible, address the letter to the person doing the hiring. Try to mix your qualifications in with the stated requirements for the position.

    Keep in mind, even though a resume tells your story, this isn't about you. It's about what you can do for a prospective employer.
    Last edited by espressoguy; 12-28-2011 at 09:26 AM.
    L. Mark Kozu, COC, CPC, CCC

  10. #20
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    534
    Smile Kudos to everyone in this thread
    I don't have anything constructive to add to this thread but needed to comment on it all just the same.

    Brandi - Every post I've pretty much ever read by you shows me you have nothing to apologize for in your cover letter. You are probably one of the most educated posters on these boards and one of the msot helpful too. The fact you "only" have 4 years amazes me to your intelligence. I always thought you would be someone that's done this for years.

    I think the phrase "you go girl" applies here.

    And to everyone one else helping her out with her resume and cover letter. *applause* all around folks.

    This is what makes the AAPC and our members so great. And it's really refreshing to see such a positive and helpful post in this section.

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