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Help! I have NO idea what I'm doing!

  1. #21
    Red face Awww, shucks!
    Exam Training Packages
    You guys are so great!!! I really appreciate the encouragement more than you'll ever know...this is really pretty scary for me, and I don't want to screw it up! Thank you all for all of your help!

  2. #22
    Default Kudos to everyone in this thread
    Brandi,

    You did a fine job listing your accomplishments on your resume.

    Any employer would recognize not only your enthusiasm but also that you are a high achiever as evident by the time span in which you gained this knowledge.

    Your articulate post on the forum show professional capability as well as good judgement.

    I would make sure that you indicate your most current job (Compliance) in first position followed by your past positions.

    Maria A. Candia CPC, CPC-H, CPCO, CPMA, CEMC

  3. #23
    Default Cover Letter Round 2
    Okay, I've implemented the suggestions above, to the extent that I can for template cover letter...the major changes are in red. Also, I'm definitely re-listing my positions on the resume in reverse chronological order - thanks to all who reminded me of that - I would have forgotten!

    I'll be sure to include my contact info on the resume and cover - Name, Phone and Email for sure - would you guys recommend adding anything else, or would that be sufficient?

    Let me know what you think...Thanks again!!!

    Greetings:

    Thank you for taking the time to review my attached resume, and for considering me for the [name of position] position within your company. My goal is to continue to expand upon the considerable amount of knowledge that I've been able to obtain in the business side of healthcare thus far; and I hope to grow further as professional in the field, by learning from the best in the business, at [Name of Company].

    I've got an insatiable curiosity; I find problem-solving highly enjoyable, and will investigate topics to an extreme degree, simply because I want to know something new. I realize that not everyone shares my passion in this capacity, so whenever I'm able, I provide a synopsis of what I've learned to my collegues, in an attempt to try to make others' jobs a little bit easier.

    An example of this comes from my time working with commercial claim appeals; whenever it became evident that a denial issue was the result of more than just a few isolated incidences, I would draft an appeal template for our entire billing office to use, when sending in corrected claims, as the problem was being resolved. For complex issues, I'd also include an educational handout, explaining as much as I could, regarding what I'd learned about the issue, and how things were supposed to work, in an attempt to provide them with the tools they'll need to perform their jobs more efficiently, and effectively.

    For example: Often times, a lipid panel code (CPT 80061) is billed in conjunction with an LDL lab code (83721), and when the latter code is billed without a 59 modifier, it will typically deny as "bundled" to the lipid panel. I drafted an appeal to accompany our corrected claims (when 83721 was appropriately rebilled with modifier 59); as well as a handout for our billing and follow-up staff, explaining [that:] the LDL cholesterol can be estimated in most cases, by using data derived from the results of the lipid panel, which is why the LDL isn't considered 'separately payable'; however, certain circumstances are known to compromise the data for the LDL's calculation (eg, when the patient's triglyceride levels are >400). During such instances, billing the 83721 in addition to 80061 is considered medically necessary, as long as it's appended with the 59 modifier.


    I always apply the same level of dedication, whether I'm performing a simple task, or something with much more significance; my name to being attached to any form of sub-standard work, would be unacceptable, to me. I'm confident in my ability to learn anything you're able to teach me, and accomplish any professional goal that you may set. I hope that you'll allow me to demonstrate my potential, by giving me the opportunity to redefine what a "top-performer" is, for you. Thanks again for your time. I look forward to meeting you!

    Signed,

    Brandi Tadlock, CPC, CPC-P, CPMA, CPCO

  4. #24
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    1,087
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by btadlock1 View Post
    Okay, I've implemented the suggestions above, to the extent that I can for template cover letter...the major changes are in red. Also, I'm definitely re-listing my positions on the resume in reverse chronological order - thanks to all who reminded me of that - I would have forgotten!

    I'll be sure to include my contact info on the resume and cover - Name, Phone and Email for sure - would you guys recommend adding anything else, or would that be sufficient?

    Let me know what you think...Thanks again!!!

    Greetings:

    Thank you for taking the time to review my attached resume, and for considering me for the [name of position] position within your company. My goal is to continue to expand upon the considerable amount of knowledge that I've been able to obtain in the business side of healthcare thus far; and I hope to grow further as professional in the field, by learning from the best in the business, at [Name of Company].

    I've got an insatiable curiosity; I find problem-solving highly enjoyable, and will investigate topics to an extreme degree, simply because I want to know something new. I realize that not everyone shares my passion in this capacity, so whenever I'm able, I provide a synopsis of what I've learned to my collegues, in an attempt to try to make others' jobs a little bit easier.

    An example of this comes from my time working with commercial claim appeals; whenever it became evident that a denial issue was the result of more than just a few isolated incidences, I would draft an appeal template for our entire billing office to use, when sending in corrected claims, as the problem was being resolved. For complex issues, I'd also include an educational handout, explaining as much as I could, regarding what I'd learned about the issue, and how things were supposed to work, in an attempt to provide them with the tools they'll need to perform their jobs more efficiently, and effectively.

    For example: Often times, a lipid panel code (CPT 80061) is billed in conjunction with an LDL lab code (83721), and when the latter code is billed without a 59 modifier, it will typically deny as "bundled" to the lipid panel. I drafted an appeal to accompany our corrected claims (when 83721 was appropriately rebilled with modifier 59); as well as a handout for our billing and follow-up staff, explaining [that:] the LDL cholesterol can be estimated in most cases, by using data derived from the results of the lipid panel, which is why the LDL isn't considered 'separately payable'; however, certain circumstances are known to compromise the data for the LDL's calculation (eg, when the patient's triglyceride levels are >400). During such instances, billing the 83721 in addition to 80061 is considered medically necessary, as long as it's appended with the 59 modifier.


    I always apply the same level of dedication, whether I'm performing a simple task, or something with much more significance; my name to being attached to any form of sub-standard work, would be unacceptable, to me. I'm confident in my ability to learn anything you're able to teach me, and accomplish any professional goal that you may set. I hope that you'll allow me to demonstrate my potential, by giving me the opportunity to redefine what a "top-performer" is, for you. Thanks again for your time. I look forward to meeting you!

    Signed,

    Brandi Tadlock, CPC, CPC-P, CPMA, CPCO
    Looks great! I know the hiring manager that spoke to our chapter also emphasized we all need to be sure to carefully proof for any spelling mistakes. I didn't see any and you write very well! That will go a long way towards showing your capabilites. Good luck!
    Arlene J. Smith, CPC, CPMA, CEMC, COBGC

  5. #25
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by ajs View Post
    Looks great! I know the hiring manager that spoke to our chapter also emphasized we all need to be sure to carefully proof for any spelling mistakes. I didn't see any and you write very well! That will go a long way towards showing your capabilites. Good luck!
    Thanks! I saw one error in my last paragraph, but I fixed it on my actual copy (I had an extra 'to' in there...I'm a grammar-freak!)

  6. #26
    Location
    Sarasota FL
    Posts
    931
    Default Cover letter
    Just a couple of things to comment on.
    I would avoid "you'll" and other similar abbreviations and use " you will" instead.
    Also, I was always told to keep a cover letter brief. Yours is interesting and a little different so the person reading it will remain interested but it may be better if it was condensed somewhat.

  7. #27
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,573
    Default
    HAHA I found that one "to". You know I read this and it is really well stated. I am wondering if the example of the lipid panel would be better as an attachment with a statement such as please see the attached <memo> as an example of my efforts to communicate with and educate fellow staff......
    I am just wondering if that would flow better... thoughts?

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  8. #28
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchellde View Post
    HAHA I found that one "to". You know I read this and it is really well stated. I am wondering if the example of the lipid panel would be better as an attachment with a statement such as please see the attached <memo> as an example of my efforts to communicate with and educate fellow staff......
    I am just wondering if that would flow better... thoughts?
    I had considered that - what I did instead, was put it in a slightly smaller font, and it's italicized, so it's easy to skip over - I didn't want to have to mess with having several pages. I uploaded a polished copy...Thanks for the input!

    On a side note - why is it that you can upload 195KB Word documents, but PDF's and Text files are limited to 19.5KB??? That's annoying!
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by btadlock1; 12-28-2011 at 03:41 PM. Reason: Stupid formatting! 3rd time's the charm!

  9. #29
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    12,573
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by btadlock1 View Post
    I had considered that - what I did instead, was put it in a slightly smaller font, and it's italicized, so it's easy to skip over - I didn't want to have to mess with having several pages. I uploaded a polished copy...Thanks for the input!

    On a side note - why is it that you can upload 195KB Word documents, but PDF's and Text files are limited to 19.5KB??? That's annoying!
    Thats a Windows thing! I love my Apple!

    Debra A. Mitchell, MSPH, CPC-H

  10. #30
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchellde View Post
    Thats a Windows thing! I love my Apple!
    LOL

    I bet you DO! Stupid PC with its inferior operating system...

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