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HHS Press Release: Just announced

  1. #31
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    Medical Coding Books
    The US can not go directly to ICD-11. First, it is just in the beginning stages of development by WHO. Second, ICD-11 is based on the principles of ICD-10. The short story is if the US waits for ICD-11, it will be way more complicated than going from ICD-9 to ICD-10, and would cost tons more money to do as well. Third, there are future programs that are contingent on ICD-10 being in place and implemented. All those programs would have to be put on hold, and it would continue to create a major backlog. Think of the physician fee schedule every year, look how much bigger the issue becomes because Congress can't/won't fix the problem. Waiting on ICD-11 would be that type of situation, only about 1000 times more!!
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  2. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mmorningstarcpc View Post
    The US can not go directly to ICD-11. First, it is just in the beginning stages of development by WHO. Second, ICD-11 is based on the principles of ICD-10. The short story is if the US waits for ICD-11, it will be way more complicated than going from ICD-9 to ICD-10, and would cost tons more money to do as well. Third, there are future programs that are contingent on ICD-10 being in place and implemented. All those programs would have to be put on hold, and it would continue to create a major backlog. Think of the physician fee schedule every year, look how much bigger the issue becomes because Congress can't/won't fix the problem. Waiting on ICD-11 would be that type of situation, only about 1000 times more!!
    Why does it matter if ICD-11 is based on the principles of ICD-10? ICD-10 is a whole new coding language, so if we have to learn a whole new language, why not go straight to the one that is up to date? So what if it is a little more complicated? We will have several more years to prepare.

    The ICD-10 transition at this point in time is extremely inefficient and useless since it will be outdated as soon as it is functional in the US. The only ones that are up in arms about any type of postponing are those that have some type of financial interest in ICD-10. Those that are against it are those that are unprepared for any transition.

    I am on schedule with ICD-10 compliance if need be, but I think it's a day late, dollar short no matter when it will be implemented. Why not be ahead of the game and prepare for implementing the most current ICD available?

  3. #33
    Default ICD-10 At This Stage Makes No Sense
    I left a comment back in 2008 during the Proposed Rule period for ICD-10 stating that we should skip ICD-10 completely and go to ICD-11. Now that ICD-10 compliance is being delayed, I vehemently stand by that original opinion.

    The Final Rule for ICD-10 from January of 2009 stated that a clinical modification for ICD-11 could not be put into place until the years 2020. This was a half-truth, as ICD-11 is going to be the first classification system with a clinical modification built in. What CMS was referring to was an American, insurance-friendly clinical modification designed to more easily deny claims.

    The worldwide relsease date for ICD-11 (WITH clinical modification) is May of 2015, which means that four years from now, without ICD-11, we'll be exactly where we are today, which is to be doomed to be behind the rest of the world in disease, symptom and morphology reporting for the next decade because a lobbyist who writes a check is worried about "costs".
    J. Paul Spencer, CPC, CPC-H

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by laurenkrass View Post
    Why does it matter if ICD-11 is based on the principles of ICD-10? ICD-10 is a whole new coding language, so if we have to learn a whole new language, why not go straight to the one that is up to date? So what if it is a little more complicated? We will have several more years to prepare.

    The ICD-10 transition at this point in time is extremely inefficient and useless since it will be outdated as soon as it is functional in the US. The only ones that are up in arms about any type of postponing are those that have some type of financial interest in ICD-10. Those that are against it are those that are unprepared for any transition.

    I am on schedule with ICD-10 compliance if need be, but I think it's a day late, dollar short no matter when it will be implemented. Why not be ahead of the game and prepare for implementing the most current ICD available?
    To understand why it matters that ICD-11 is based on ICD-10, I respectfully suggest you dial into the Coordination and Maintenance Meetings at CMS, help in March and Sept each year. They give very detailed information. You can go to meetings at cms.gov 30 days prior to a schedule meeting and register.

    Also, you are totally incorrect about the only people being up in arms about delaying the transition. I strongly object to the delay, and I have no monetary gain from implementation, other than being employed!!! Many, many, many coders are in favor of the implementation as is on 10/1/13. Many have worked very hard to get to the point we are at now and are not in favor of waiting any longer.
    Machelle Morningstar, CPC, COC, CEMC, COSC
    AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer

  5. Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mmorningstarcpc View Post
    They can not wait until ICD-11. First of all, that is just in the very beginning stages of development, so will be several years away. Then it will have to go thru rule making processes in the US before it can be implemented. Second, and more important, it is based on the principles of ICD-10. Delaying until ICD-11 is not an option. There is more about this in the proposed and final rules for ICD-10. Third, they have to implement ICD-10as it is the code set of HIPAA.

    If they would wait until ICD-11, it would be way more to implement than ICD-10 is.
    Could someone clarify how ICD-11 is based on ICD-10 and what specifically about ICD-10 must be implemented to make ICD-11 implementation work? Just the facts, please.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristin Ledbetter View Post
    Could someone clarify how ICD-11 is based on ICD-10 and what specifically about ICD-10 must be implemented to make ICD-11 implementation work? Just the facts, please.
    I have been reading up on several options proposed regarding the delay. Regarding ICD-11 uses the concepts of ICD-10 and expands upon them. Without ICD-10 knowledge already in place, the utilization of ICD-11 would be far more cumbersome. I found a list of known problems in the BETA version of ICD-11 on the WHO website, and item #7 says this:
    It is premature to plan to go to ICD-11 when major applications for ICD-10 are not implemented.
    Currently there is a gap in the ICD-10 implementation world. Only 117 countries out of 194 report mortality data using one form of ICD to WHO despite the fact that there is an international health regulation since 1967. Some countries still prefer to use ICD9 and its modifications. For example, the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10 for morbidity use is planned for October 2014 in the USA.
    These implementation issues are context specific. For example, global implementation is dependent upon the existence of “vital registration systems” and country specific examples depend on their unique health information infrastructure.
    WHO is managing a revision process to enable a scientific update of the classification scheme on the one hand (ICD10 was constructed between 1982-89 and was approved in 1990. In a sense we are using a 20-25 year old medical information standard). On the other hand, the emergence of information technology requires ICD to “interoperate” with electronic health applications – to be compatible with the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED CT) and other terminology and ontologies.
    http://www.who.int/classifications/i...wnconcerns.pdf

    In other articles that I have read, it states that in order for the US to convert ICD-11 to a clinical modification we could use, it would not be ready for implementation until 2021. Frankly, ICD-9 is out of room and we can't wait that long for a replacement.

    I am still researching ICD-11. I don't agree with waiting for ICD-11 based upon what I have been reading. I hope the delay is not extended for more than 1 year, but as time passes quickly, I am grateful for the extra time to work on the conversion. I have been working on the conversion for almost a year now, and with the differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10, mappings are sometimes very difficult and cumbersome. This reply has gotten very long, so I won't go into details, but feel free to ask me any questions about what I have learned in the conversion process.

    Michelle Hanson, CPC

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