At-home professions

ded1982

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I have been a medical coder for 5 years now and have worked various jobs in the industry and have found through my experience that I really enjoy the entire aspect of the office side of medical visits-from transcription to billing. Tonight I went to a seminar put on by a company 'at-home professions' that is basically an online curriculum that promises to teach you all you need to know about the four areas of this interest-transcription, coding, billing and medical document editing-or a 'healthcare documentation program' as they put it. They say it is designed to provide you with the education and skills needed to help change your course of practice to a home-based position. Does anyone have any experience with this specific program-good or bad that could offer me some advice. After 5 years of coding I find myself frustrated and ready to quit because I am in a rural area that every position I have held seems to be an aggravated mess of trying to show the importance of proper coding procedures and protocols while hitting brick walls with the members of staff who have been doing it their way for 30 years and don't understand the need to change with the times. It sounds like a good program to me but I want to make sure it isn't one of those 'too good to be true' scenarios. Thanks in advance!
 

Pam Brooks

True Blue
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If you have the coding skills sufficient to work in the outside world, then you probably don't need to further significantly strengthen those skills in order to work from home. What you do need to work from home is the appropriate physical space (i.e. an office that you can secure), high-speed internet capability, the ability to prioritize, self-motivation and the ability to work autonomously. Those last few are personality traits....and probably can't be learned, so if you don't already have that kind of personality, be cautious about what you're signing up for. There's a lot of misconception about working from home.....you can't always make your own hours, you can't always work in your jammies, and you can't always have 15 hours to do 8 hours of work while you shuffle laundry and feed the kids inbetween. I have home coders and they have set hours, they have to be ready to come into the office if they're needed here, and they have to work productively during the day. Plus they miss out on the birthday celebrations, the impromptu workplace meetings and the comraderie of an office situation.

Although I understand your frustration with your old fashioned providers, there isn't a job out there that doesn't have issues. A commute to a bigger city might be a better choice than a work-from-home situation that leaves you bored, lonely and uninspired, and treated like a robot.

If you do decide to look into this company, ask for references---real ones from actual employees or clients who aren't being paid to advertise. Google the company and find out who they really are. Don't be dazzled by a flashy presentation and a promise of a lucrative career. As a coder, you already have the skills, so make sure they don't take advantage of your dissatisfaction at your current job.

Let's look at this in another way....what have you done to improve your current situation? There's a difference between doing it 'the old fashioned way', and doing it the non-compliant way. If they're still having you type HCFAs, you might put together a business proposal that walks them through the process of an affordable electronic health record initiation...and then point out the financial benefits of Meaningful Use. Have they any idea about ICD-10? Provide them with the education, the steps and the risk if they're not on board in time. Sometimes people are afraid to change because they don't have the details or the know-how. If they're asking you to do things that are fraudulent, then you need to show them the regulatory guidance, and ask them to trust you (as a certified coder) to do the right things on their behalf. If they still balk, then it's time for a change.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. This board is full of would-be coders who bought into those 'We'll teach you how to code and make 40K per year" schemes. You really have to make a decision that is right for you. None of us can tell you what to do, but we can ask you to make sure you do your research in advance (like all good coders should) before making a move.
 
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At-Home Professions

Hi Ded1982

The Healthcare Document Specialist has a Career Starter Kit that addresses the questions about creating your own home-based business. Some of the items included in this kit touch on reaching perspective clients, how to run a home-based service, creating and using a daily log sheet, how to invoice and even claims submission to name a few. Also, lifetime graduate support is available to provide guidance and advise throughout your career. This entire course is also available online, or via correspondence. If you're interested, call 877-515-5110 to speak with an AHP representative.
 
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I've fallen for this... read on

Hi, I too fell for their great sales pitch. but then I realized it was a mistake. after doing a lot more research, I can tell you that if you have the knowledge all you need is maybe a certification from aapc or ahima to make you more official. and if you do the aapc study guide and practice exams you may do good. "IF" you feel that you need more learning in terms of coding, you can do what I did. I actually cancelled my at home profession class and signed up with a MUCH better, school (I took the loss), I decided it is worth the investment to get so much more, and I didn't look back or regret it at all!!!!

if you want more info please PM me and I will help you.
 

jwar2019

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at-home professions

I took this course at the advice of a co-worker who took it. I have been working in the medical billing field for 10 years. My goal of taking the courses through at home professions was to learn coding and prepare to take the CPC exam. I had a death in the family after I completed the course, so I ordered the AAPC's study guide to bush up on what I learned. I'm shocked at how little at home professions prepared me for the exam. Looking back now I realize I may have taken the wrong course. At home profession definitely did not focus enough on CPT coding. There practice tests gave you the procedure, which is much easier than trying to figure out the procedure though vast medical notes. With this study guide which I've learned mimics the exam is way harder than the way at home professions structured the course. I wish I would have taken it though the AAPC.
 
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