Neuro abbreviations

Tonyj

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Does anyone have a cheat sheet for commonly used neuro abbreviations or a website that may accomodate such a request?
I posted this request awhile ago. I'm going to try again to see if anyone can assist me.

I've attached a commonly used physical exam with the abbreviations that I have questions on in "quotations". I'm trying to count bullets points for neuro physical exam and I get a little stumped with the abbreviations.

GEN: Elderly-appearing and without deformities. Alopecia. Somnolent from opiates.
MS: Oriented to person, place, time. Recent and remote memory intact. Normal attention and concentration.
Fluent spontaneous speech. Intact naming and repetition. Limited fund of knowledge.
CN: Full "VF". PERRL EOMI. V 1-3 intact. Face symm. Hearing intact. Palate midline. "SCM" normal bilaterally. "TML". No dysarthria.
STR: Normal tone, bulk and power in arms and legs, aside from proximal RLE which I am unable to test due to hip fracture. No pronator drift. No abnormal movements.
SENS: Intact "PP, JPS, VIB" throughout.
CERB: "FTN and RAHM" intact bilaterally.
GAIT: Not tested for safety.
"DTR": 2+ symm, Absent Babinski sign bilaterally.
VASC: No peripheral edema. Normal peripheral pulses. No carotid bruits.
EYES: Funduscopic exam reveals no papilledema. No hemorrhage.
CV: Normal rate and rhythm. No murmurs, rubs or gallops.
ABD: NT, ND, no HSM. Normal BS x 4.
RESP: CTAB.
MSK: Right leg is shortened and externally rotated.
 

thelton

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VF could stand for visual field. I googled "medical abbreviations" and found a website that I have on my favorites to use. Another thing we do is start a list of abbreiviations for our providers; we may have to ask them the first time what the abbreviation means, but we have the list from then on. The list also comes in handy when records are requested by Medicare or another insurance company.
 

mhstrauss

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Does anyone have a cheat sheet for commonly used neuro abbreviations or a website that may accomodate such a request?
I posted this request awhile ago. I'm going to try again to see if anyone can assist me.

I've attached a commonly used physical exam with the abbreviations that I have questions on in "quotations". I'm trying to count bullets points for neuro physical exam and I get a little stumped with the abbreviations.

GEN: Elderly-appearing and without deformities. Alopecia. Somnolent from opiates.
MS: Oriented to person, place, time. Recent and remote memory intact. Normal attention and concentration.
Fluent spontaneous speech. Intact naming and repetition. Limited fund of knowledge.
CN: Full "VF". PERRL EOMI. V 1-3 intact. Face symm. Hearing intact. Palate midline. "SCM" normal bilaterally. "TML". No dysarthria.
STR: Normal tone, bulk and power in arms and legs, aside from proximal RLE which I am unable to test due to hip fracture. No pronator drift. No abnormal movements.
SENS: Intact "PP, JPS, VIB" throughout.
CERB: "FTN and RAHM" intact bilaterally.
GAIT: Not tested for safety.
"DTR": 2+ symm, Absent Babinski sign bilaterally.
VASC: No peripheral edema. Normal peripheral pulses. No carotid bruits.
EYES: Funduscopic exam reveals no papilledema. No hemorrhage.
CV: Normal rate and rhythm. No murmurs, rubs or gallops.
ABD: NT, ND, no HSM. Normal BS x 4.
RESP: CTAB.
MSK: Right leg is shortened and externally rotated.
SCM--Sternocleidomastoid
TML--TM might be tympanic membranes, not sure about the "L" though
PP--Pin Prick
VIB-vibrations
FTN--Finger to Nose
RAHM--Rapid Alternating Hand Movements

That's all the ones I know right off the top of my head. Here's a sight that has good explanations of what this all means...not sure if they have many abbreviations, but the site is really good. Hope this all helps!

http://www.neuroexam.com/neuroexam/
 
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The main abbreviations are referencing the body areas or organ systems on the physical examine. The ones that follow either refer to the test done on that organ system/body area or the patient's result.


GEN-General
MS-Mental Status
CN- Cranial Nerves VF - Visual Field PERRL Pupils Equally Round and Reactive to light
EOMI: Extra Ocular Movement Intact SCM - Sternocleidomastoid
STR- Strength RLE - Right Lower Extremity
SENS - Sensory JPS - joint position sense VIB - vibrations
CERB - Cerebellar FTN - Finger to Nose RAHM -Rapid Alternating Hand Movement
DTR - Deep Tendon Reflexes
VASC - Vascular
CV - Cardiovascular
ABD- Abdomen NT - Non Tender ND - Non Distended HSM- hepatosplenomegaly BS - Bowel Sounds
RESP-Respiratory CTAB - Clear to auscultation bilaterally
MSK- Musculoskeletal


The one I am not sure of is PP but I think maybe it stands for Proprioception (patient's ability to sense where their limbs are in relation to their body eg above their head, out to the side, etc).

Hope this was helpful. I would ask the physician to clarify to be sure and there is a lot of great info on the web.
 

dlashua

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SCM - Sensation, Circulation and motion
TML - Tongue midline
VF - Visual Field (CNII)
PP - Pinprick, Proprioception (ask provider what they mean when they use it)
JPS - Joint Position Sense
VIB - Vibration
FTN - Finger to Nose
RAHM - Rapid Alternating Hand Movements
DTR - Deep Tendon Reflexes

Looks like you have received lots of help - Good Luck! I use the following resources: Medical Abbreviations 13th Edition from Neil M Davis Bate's Pocket Guide to Physical Examination and of course Google.
 
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