Beyond frustrated with the lack of entry level jobs in this field

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This thread became too heated, so I have deleted what posts I could. I would have deleted the whole thread if that was an option, but unfortunately it isn't.
 
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Daniel Rowden

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People fail to realize that not all entry level jobs for coding are directly applying coding. Many places you have to start off small and work your way up. My very first job would not really be considered a coder as I was more of a pre-bill clerk making sure things weren't missed and worked through denials but this job got me my first Coding Auditor job because they liked my work ethic and they felt I had a lot of potential.

I am a remote inpatient coder and I have a job where I audit. I'm in school going for my Bachelor's in Heath Information Management hence the two jobs because school is expensive and I'm having to pay out of my own pocket. I'm 26 years old and a male, I've been coding for about 3 years now. I have only met one other male coder.

My first job "coding" was doing review of documentation to verify that the correct codes were selected before billing and adding modifiers as this was physician coding and the physician picked the codes and I just made sure they were supported. My second job was auditing claim forms to documentation for inpatient facility care checking the DRG assignment and that the dates and such were accurate and that coding conventions were followed so that reimbursement was appropriate. After a time they then moved me into coding inpatient cases. Now I code remotely doing inpatient coding, LTAC, and inpatient psychiatric hospitals and I have a part time job where I audit.

What helped me was that I was willing to study and pursue multiple credentials from both the AAPC (CPC-H and CIC) and AHIMA (my CCS). This helped me get noticed because it showed that I had a good work ethic to get multiple credentials. My aunt also always told me that the more letters you have after your name the more money you make. In my experience some places want one and some places want the other coding organization. Another thing that got me interviews and what got me my job coding remotely was that every company had tests and I aced the tests and because they saw a potential in me they gave me a chance even with only a year of inpatient experience and most places want a minimum of three including the place that hired me. Before I ever got the job coding I used to practice 1-2 coding cases every night so that I would be proficient.

Another key thing is, having a job makes it easier to find another job. I suggest that you try to find a job doing claims or billing of some kind or even simple charge entry to get in the door some where and get more experience with codes. I've heard a lot of people very discouraged about not finding a coding job but the reality is you need to find a way in. We live in a market where people are afraid to give people a chance that don't have experience. You need to market yourself and show off your skills and the best way to do that for a job is to have a good resume. Certain jobs want short to the point ones and others want it very detailed.

I would also try to talk to the local HIM departments at hospitals in your area or visiting large clinics. As a CPC-A you can get jobs doing physician or outpatient coding. Most places want the CCS, RHIT, or RHIA for inpatient from AHIMA as until recently there was no CIC from AAPC. Go to your chapter meetings and network. Networking will help far more than you realize. Someone you meet could help vouch for you and get you in the door some where and this was how I got my very first job in this area was by networking. It is hard but you have to put yourself out there. You have a one up on many people and that is a bachelor's degree. Market your business knowledge and you coding skills and I'm sure you can find something but it may not be a typical coding job at first.

The reason they want people with "experience" is because it reduces the time in which a company has to invest money into training and education. They want to spend a week teaching people about the computer systems and not 6 weeks acclimating them to coding for their first time in the real world. You just have to be persistent.

I hate seeing so many people so discouraged about job prospects. You just have to keep putting yourself out there and networking.
 

keep+

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I'm in the same sinking ship as you, gaoliver. I've heard the same things-you-should-do speeches. If it weren't for my dogs, I'd have probably killed myself by now. It shouldn't be this difficult when we try so hard. There is no point.
 

mitchellde

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What were you expectations when you decided to pursue this as a career?
What other types of employment is on your resume?
How many years have you been in the work force?
How does your previous work experience benefit the position you are applying for?
If this is a career change then why?
What made you decide on this career?
With no health care experience why should you start off as a coder?
You see these are the questions that go thru the employers minds when they look at your application and resume. If you can not/ have not addressed these issues then you can not count on a call back. It is not that there are no jobs, it is rather there are not enough qualified people to fill the positions. So you must explain why they need to take a chance on you. As a manager, any application without a professional resume and cover letter were thrown in the trash. The only apps that got to the second step were the ones that answered the questions I listed above. You must sell yourself not just fill out applications.
 

mitchellde

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Yes that is correct, so without obvious experience in coding, how can you convince a prospective employer that your "other" experience is in any way relevant and beneficial. Yes you do need at least 5 years in this field to know all the intricacies, these employers are wanting to know why they should trust you to be the coder that they need. This job carries a tremendous amount of responsibility and they really need to know they are investing in the right person. How are you suppose to get experience? You start at the bottom, that means taking a job in a facility setting as a receptionist or dietary clerk. My daughter started in the switchboard, and she is now the attorney. What I hear is that entry level people are wanting the coveted upper level experience driven positions, and while it happens occasionally, it is not realistic.
I don't have all the answers, I am just offering a different perspective to maybe help you word your resume and cover letter in a way that will catch the attention of someone.
Most of the applications I reviewed did not even have a resume, they just filled out an application. So look at it as if you were the one hiring and think about what you need as the employer for a coding position.
 

amancini1

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Sorry for your frustration

Sorry to hear about your frustration. Have you tried looking for coding contract work? They usually don't care how much experience you have because a proficiency test is given. As long as you do well on the test the agency will find work for you.

I have used www.careerbuilder.com. Do a US search of "Remote Coder" or "Remote Coding".

Here are a couple more places you can try:
-On Assignment HIM: Andrea Mccarty, Recruiter 619-849-6888
-Peak Health Solutions: Jessica Lee, Recruiter 800-435-6500 x8203
-Precyse: Lenia Hall 770-325-8228
-CSI Health Care It: Danny Negri, 615-564-1225
-Simply Hired: Set up job alert and you will receive emails.
-Med Partners
-Maxim


I hope all this helps and good luck in your job search
 
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keep+

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Deborah, hasn't it been less than a month since you became certified? That is hardly a reason to talk suicide. I haven't found a coding job yet and it has been over a year since my certification. If my ship has floated this long then surely you can last a little longer.
I have tried getting a medical reception job since May, knowing that I needed to get my foot in the door once I graduated. No, it has not been a year, but no one is considering me since I have never worked in a medical office. I have been a receptionist before. I don't know what the big deal is besides the fact that they have medical records. Whoop-di-do!
 

Pam Brooks

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I am a coding manager. Let me assure you, I am not lazy and to suggest so on this board (where hiring managers such as myself are visiting) is a sure fire way to not get yourself hired. I frequently hire CPC-As, for entry level positions. But I would never, ever hire a brand new coder for coding work that requires experience, regardless of how philanthropic I feel. As a manager, my job and responsibility to the organization is to code and send to billing over 600 million in revenue every year. I can't screw that up by bringing in folks who clearly mean well, want to work but just don't have the developed skill set. So even though I have a need for a few entry level folks, it would be career suicide to bring in people who don't know what they don't know.

gaoliver87, in one of your posts you mentioned that you don't even really want to code. Here's my advice. Please don't. If you're not 100% committed to this work, to the field and to the education and career development it will require year after year in order to stay up to date on changes and to improve your skills, then kindly step aside and leave that entry level position to someone who is.

If you thought that your degree and certification would open up doors for you, you are correct. But what I also know as a hiring manager, all the credentials, certifications and degrees in the world do not matter to me if the candidate is not the right personality fit for my group. And as a hiring manager, the phrase "you don't have enough experience" has nothing to do with coding skills. It has more to do with people skills, with attitude and other personality quirks that managers like me see and know that are just not going to be a good blend with the rest of the staff. In fact, the number one reason I let people go (and I have) is not skill-related. Usually it has to do with breaking HR rules, not getting along or not being a team player.

And by the way.....some of my staff are men, (five out of 26) so don't throw the gender card at us please.

What does your resume look like? I'd be happy to take a peek at it if you're interested in some constructive feedback.
 

MnTwins29

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Gender alert - a MAN who has had a successful career in this field

I followed this with interest - especially when it got to the gender issue. I started in this field as a medical records secretary (when they were still called that in the late 90's) even though - gasp! - I am a man. I was willing to learn a new field, was just out of the Navy and even though my degree had nothing to do with the medical field, I showed I was organized, paid attention to detail (a good trait to have in the military as well!) and willing to learn.

No, I didn't dream of being a coder when I grew up - but I was willing to learn! That's what mattered - not my gender, age, even certification (although that came later). It progressed to where I am now a hospital compliance officer - and last I looked, I am still a man and succeeding. Even though both coding and compliance have more women than men (in the former a LOT more), the jobs and how you succeed are gender-neutral. I hate hearing that as a reason - whether gender, race, age, whatever - what do you have to show that hiring manager?
 

mitchellde

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Thank you Lance! That was well stated. "What do you have to show the hiring manager". Is exactly what I have been trying to say. If you cannot convince me that you have what it takes then my response is that you do not have the necessary experience. Are you aware that back in the 70s and 80s the majority of hospitals wanted only RNs as coders? I am not an RN but I applied anyway and I explained what I had that I felt they needed and I got the job. And yet what gets my fur up the most is the impression from the original poster that this job takes little to no skill or training. That is demeaning to all of us that consider ourselves to be professional coders. I have been in this profession a long long time ( started with ICD-7) and I learn everyday ! I will never know everything but then that is what keeps me going.
 

MnTwins29

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The late 90s were a glorious time in this country economically. Unemployment was at historic lows and employers were in general scrambling for anyone. Try aging into the workforce of the Great Recession during late 2000s and the early 2010s like I did and I highly suspect you would have similar employment difficulties.
Actually I HAVE BEEN "aging (53 yo now - not ashamed to admit it)...during the late 2000s and early 2010's" - I have been with my current employer for almost 5 years (but three different positions, including a coding auditor) and between the "glorious" late 90's and 2010 I had 9 different employers - a couple of which I was downsized, one of which was definately age-related, and the others I left because of the usual reasons - better pay, growth, etc. So, if you think I was just sitting around at the same place since those "glorious" times, think again - I went through all the struggles any other aging worker would have. And frankly, even with the recent promotion, I still don't feel that secure. But in case that does happen again, I will be ready and make sure that I have those skills that I can bring to the hiring manager - like I have been doing the past 15+ years. Even if I am not looking it's best to have that ready. Like back when I was in Boy Scouts - "Be Prepared."

First gender, now age - is there another hot-button reason you supposedly can't find a job? Your posts show you have the skills, smarts and certainly the communication skills needed - if not coding a related field. IMHO, you seem to be your own worst enemy right now and let the rejections make you look for the "other reasons." And for every job you ever held, whatever field, how many no's did you get before someone said "yes"?
 
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LLovett

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Interesting discussion

I'm getting ready to speak to a large group of HIM students (half are prepping for the CPC the other half will be eligible to sit for the RHIT) and they want me to talk to them about my experience and the various jobs are out there besides production coding. Long story short I have been putting together talking points and this string caught my eye.

I have been around for awhile and I have had a lot of different rolls. I have worked in various states and for various employer types. I feel really bad for those who are new to the industry and I try really hard to lobby for hiring new coders when speaking to employers. We as an industry need to invest in the next generation(s). Everyone has to start somewhere. I have been very active in working with the various HIM programs in my local area and have helped several new coders gain employment.

Having said that, I would now like to point out a couple things in this string that are red flags to myself and likely other industry vets.

Stating coding jobs do not require training/experience/etc is completely false and shows a lack of industry understanding. The jobs you are describing are not coding, they are data entry utilizing codes, big difference. Unfortunately this type of work is often misidentified as coding to the chagrin of myself and many others.

Basing your knowledge and accuracy of a skill on what a company told you, who based on your statements was shady, is not a good idea. Maybe it is correct, I'm not saying it isn't. I'm just saying that if they would rip you off, odds are they are not that concerned with doing things correctly and I would take their feedback with a grain of salt. I would question any company that hired remote coders with no experience and no training. Frankly, as a person that has hired vendors to assist with production coding, I would not work with a company that did business in this fashion.

I totally get the frustration and I understand it. You are right, there is a lot of information out there about all these great coding jobs that supposedly exist. It makes me cringe when I see the ads pop up, work from home, make 40-50K, etc. There are unfortunately a lot of unscrupulous people out there preying on those trying to better their lives.

I feel like I'm all over the place in this post but I want to end on a positive note. If you want to go a different direction with your career that is understandable. I would personally advise you to look outside the box on the coding thing as you are moving on. There are a lot of non-traditional coding related jobs that may be more in line with your ultimate goals. As a consultant I have recently been doing a lot of work with both the legal and investment industries. With a business background this may be an arena that would make more sense than production coding for you. Investment firms are buying physician practices left and right at the moment and in doing so there are a lot of due diligence issues they are working through. There are a lot of healthcare focused law firms as well. Another option, there are healthcare focused accounting firms out there.

Just some food for thought, I wish you and all the others the best,

Laura, CPC, CPMA, CPC-I, CEMC
 

webman49

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webman49

Read GasOliver's statement of disgust and feel the same way. Passed the CPC exam on 6-1-2014 and had zero success in even getting an interview much less landing a job. When I think of the money and time I spent to develop a skill and compare it with the return on my investment I get burning mad. My feeling is that if I had been warned that it is an extremely difficult field to break into, I would never have invested in a career change at all. I can't help feeling that the local community college here in Richmond, AAPAC and AHIMA are all complicit in that they were all disingenuous in painting too rosy a picture of opportunities in this area. It appears that CPC-As are little more than a dime a dozen at this point. All the effort in the classroom, tuition, membership dues and exam fees bought me nothing but a seat on the "pine tar". This "rant" is coming from someone that had a perfect 4.0 GPA in pre-pharm and yet I am relegated to the scout team. Please pardon my language when I say "The Hell with this!"
 

twizzle

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For some positive news on my front, I am happy to say that I found employment. It is with a pan-asian restaurant located in downtown Orlando. I am still in training for a serving position for another week but by what I can see this looks like it is going to be a very enjoyable place to work. The team is so nice and the food is delicious and the location is really hip and has a great energy about it.

I am not even going to look at medical coding jobs for at LEAST six months! At this point I feel like the worst thing going for me is that the tedious coding field has resulted in lacerations of my work history that is probably making employers think that I can't hold a job. :mad: My next step is that I need to fix that pronto.

I will continue to go to my monthly coding meetings. If nothing else just for the CEUs. I'm not going to network at all or pester other coders about any open positions at their jobs (the common answer is that I would need experience anyway). I'll sit there, smile, maybe chit chat a bit for good measure. But I couldn't care less at this point about finding a coding job. I am finally employed again and I am happier than I have been for a long time.
I love your attitude...good for you. Who knows, this may open up a career in the restaurant business.
Of course, you do have to keep your goals to enter the coding field going as well. It is a difficult field to enter and my response on these issues has always been the same. To start off with, AAPC needs to raise the hurdle for the CPC and make the passing score higher. I've suggested 80% previously. Too many just scrape through, have limited knowledge, and will never make it in coding. They see it as a cushy job where they can work from home.
I see the number of people who pass every month, creating an even bigger problem which is not going to go away.
I was in a similar situation 6 years ago but got a job advertised as..."holds CCS-P with 3 years of cardiology experience preferred".
I got it for 2 reasons....very few applied for the job, and I have a medical background. I'm still there now. I had none of the experience they wanted.

My company(we too are in Florida) has a lot of trouble attracting coders.. the pay is well below average so that may be the cause but it does offer full benefits.
I have suggested time and time again that they employ a newly-certified coder who has passion, motivation, a genuine desire to learn and ideally some element of employment in a medical environment (always good). Everyone said it was a good idea but no one followed up on it.
I'm not talking about employing a lazy bimbo who has scraped through the CPC and is more concerned with texting her boyfriend and taking care of her nails.

I want us to employ someone who has the above-mentioned good qualities and who wants to learn..no bad habits, no bad attitude (we always did it this way in my last job and I'm not going to change). We will train them to be ethical, communicative, accurate and many other things. Unfortunately, the company is not interested.

Good luck to all of you trying to enter this field.
 

TheStephCode

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I started in hospital registration followed by insurance eligibility then moved to insurance follow-up and finally, through contacts and good reputation, made my way to the coding department. It took a while but my experience in registration and insurance provided a wealth of knowledge.

It will be very difficult to find a paid coding position without experience but working in insurance follow-up will provided that experience. It won't pay well but it will provide a stepping stone to your target position in coding.
 

MnTwins29

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Legibility

gaoliver's post about the placement test raises another point: in addition to not using electronic records, which he mentions, the bigger problem is legibility. CMS, external auditors, attorneys, and the like will NOT accept illegible records like that. I do find it somewhat strange that a place will use a coding test that does not reflect the type of record the candidate would be reading if accepted for the position.

If the restaurant biz works out for you, hey, that's great. And frankly, even if there isn't a coding job in the future, I also commend you for going to the local meetings and keeping up the CEU's. Sure, it looks bleak now...but you never know what may transpire, so this is a means to at least keep that option available.
 

LLovett

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Handwritten charts are not illegal

Participating providers are subject to a decreased reimbursement rate from Medicare and Medicaid if they have not met meaningful use measures, but handwritten notes are not illegal.

In a case where documentation has been requested that will likely not be legible to someone outside of the office, you can submit a typed version in addition to the original.

Laura, CPC, CPMA, CPC-I, CEMC
 

user576

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Apples and oranges. You have a degree in Business Management. That has periphreal value, but it's not specific to the job you're applying for. Also, remember that resumes are marketing tools. You can omit information not related to the field. Just be ethical about it and be careful about gaps in your record. Unrelated information that is hurting your chances can be left out. That's one of the biggest application and resume errors around. Another thing, physically visit a potential employer and talk to them directly when you can. At the very least, you'll get helpful feedback and an inside track to other possible positions at that office or facility that can get you in the door. Even experienced coders get rejected because they don't know how to best present their qualifications to new potential employers. Since you already have your credentials in place, I recommend having a professional review your Resume, Cover Letter, and a Sample/Practice Application to help ensure it's not the content of your resume but the presentation of it that's hindering callbacks and interviews. Lastly, continue networking and remember that there are many people who gave up mere steps from their goal.

One more thing. Get over this ridiculous notion that medical coding is gender biased. Male coders are vastly outnumbered, but when they do enter the field they are better paid than their female counterparts, so get you facts straight.
 

Daniel Rowden

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Gender inequality does exist on multiple levels in this profession. This is also only looking at AHIMA credentialed professionals however I'm sure it carries to the AAPC certified members as well however it does back the stereotypical part of our society... Men are paid more.

Quote from the analysis if you don't feel like digging much:

"On average, women make approximately $6,500 less than males annually, net of the effect of the other variables in the analysis."

http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok1_023104.pdf

This article is really fascinating if you wanted to know how the profession compares to others and the other functions of HIM professionals.
 

AB87

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I Aced the Test as a CPC-A, and got the job before i graduated.

I saw where you said a big Derm practice in Orlando. I Know exactly what company you are referring to. I actually worked there back in 2010, and I personally know the Coding Manager, HR Corporate Director and the President/COO of the company.. The reason why the test is handwritten is the fact that all the providers (some have EMR) You will code for hand write notes, They actually give you the best notes lol (believe it or not). I passed the test with No coding experience while i was in school, in which i secured the job before i graduated. The Notes are in no way illegal, because they have already been audited and not once have had any legal issues as it pertains to the hand written notes.


They actually are a great place to start because i remember back in 2010 she told me they like to Hire people with no experience and train. In other words this place is a great stepping stone. As you move forward, they also have different specialties you can code for as well. I will admit they hire you based on your answers :eek:. This experience helped me get to where I'm at today which is a Hospital Coder and also will move into ED,OP Surgery, IR, and then IP/CDI. (I ONLY have my CPC And I'm doing facility coding). It speaks volumes how it helped me. Also even in the Hospital coding Arena you still have to read Handwritten :p

I'm a Male,and Trust me Gender plays no Role
 
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mel_pl2015

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That is right. It's really hard to find an entry level job in this field, not only for male but for female too. It seems like nobody is trusting you if you don't have an experience even you spent years in studying about it and having a certification. It doesn't really make sense. Nobody has started a very first job with years of experience. Everyone has to start from zero. When you are paid like a physician, maybe you need 2 years of experience before plunging in. Moreover, I was contacting/emailing clinics and hospitals who are under AAPC xternship, nobody did accept me or is there anyone who is interested in taking an xtern? This xternship program doesn't seem working, at least for me. I don't even like to think about discrimination. It won't do a good thing for me, even if it happens.
 

AB87

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There are several large dermatology practices in the Orlando area, and you think you know the one I took an exam at? So certain that you even claim to know people in the company.

I apologize, but I take your words with a little bit of skepticism.


Send me a message and tell me the name. Im quite sure it will be the same one I worked at. (I could be wrong). The way you describe the test and how it went was the same that happened to me. Im going off of your experience and what you wrote,Thats why I feel so certain
 
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JRalston

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Beyond Frustrated

I'm sorry you are having such a tough time finding work as a coder. As others have previously said, sometimes you have to start at the bottom and work your way up. Perhaps there are openings for health information clerks in your area. That's how I started my career 15 years ago. Getting your foot in the door can help put you in a position to begin coding. Keep your head up, I have faith things will come together for you!

Jennifer Ralston, RHIT, CPC
 

Pam Brooks

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Two things to add here.

First, to those of you saying to "start at the bottom". That information is a given within any industry. I don't think you all understand how ridiculous the hiring standards are even for these low level jobs. I have never, ever, in my whole adult life, witness a job advertisement withing a healthcare field that didn't require years of experience already doing whatever low level job was being advertised. Never in my working adulthood have I seen "entry level candidates welcome to apply" in any job even slightly related to the medical coding or records job field.

It appears that a lot of you started working in this field back in the 90s. You all need to look at this graph.

http://portalseven.com/employment/unemployment_rate_u6.jsp

From the mid 90s all the way until 2008 (but particularly in the 90s) America was facing a labor crunch nationwide. It was EASY to find work back then! I on the other hand, like other young Americans, aged into the worst job market this nation has possibly ever seen. I'll never forget the newspapers passed throughout my university campus back in 2011 that were telling us that 60% of the graduates this year would be unemployed or underemployed. To those of you talking about starting at the bottom, I don't think you all quite understand how bad the job market is and how even these opportunities are slim pickings.

Secondly, and I am going to a dark place here, but it needs to be said, most of the job postings that I see for coders that are requiring all these years of experience are more than willing to hire a candidate that has a GED(!!!). I am sorry, but if work like this can be performed by people who have not even a full high school education then don't give me a damn word that this is work that needs years of experience to perform. Clearly, this is work that can be done by the LEAST EDUCATED PEOPLE IN SOCIETY. When I see this, I stand firm that the reason why entry level coding jobs are not offered is because the current batch of managers are too lazy to bother with training anyone. I even bet that those managers have GEDs themselves.

Actually, I have a BS in Education, and am finishing my Master's in March. Just saying.

I'm all done responding to this thread, but it's crystal clear to me why you remain unemployed. Good grief.
 

AB87

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Now i can agree with you on people that started working in coding in the 90's. It was much easier because they got anybody willing to learn and trained them from the bottom up. (100% Fact, ive heard lots of ppl that got their start that way). I will say this and some people dont realize this...... When it comes to coding, Hospitals will Outsource the work overseas (India) and the coders there in some cases have little to no exp. I have researched and most enrolled in a crash course in coding. (I understand they will work for less $$).My Point is that here in the U.S its not acceptable to train people that are willing to learn coding and build them up. When we outsource im not sure if we verify the coder's to see if they have years of Exp, Even Inpatient Charts are outsourced as well.
 

twizzle

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Actually, I have a BS in Education, and am finishing my Master's in March. Just saying.

I'm all done responding to this thread, but it's crystal clear to me why you remain unemployed. Good grief.
Have to agree with you Pam. There's nothing more to be said.

Original poster is frustrated, I get that, but some of their comments are so wide of the mark that they have become worthless and meaningless.

Perhaps the Panasian restaurant really will work for him.
 

Deb2009

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What were you expectations when you decided to pursue this as a career?
What other types of employment is on your resume?
How many years have you been in the work force?
How does your previous work experience benefit the position you are applying for?
If this is a career change then why?
What made you decide on this career?
With no health care experience why should you start off as a coder?
You see these are the questions that go thru the employers minds when they look at your application and resume. If you can not/ have not addressed these issues then you can not count on a call back. It is not that there are no jobs, it is rather there are not enough qualified people to fill the positions. So you must explain why they need to take a chance on you. As a manager, any application without a professional resume and cover letter were thrown in the trash. The only apps that got to the second step were the ones that answered the questions I listed above. You must sell yourself not just fill out applications.
Debra, can you give examples of what a resume and a cover letter should look like (in your opinion)? I think many of the people aren't selling themselves and that is why they are having problems. I have applied for many positions and get nothing back either? Just not sure what employers/managers are looking for on the resume and cover letter.

Thank you in advance for any direction you can give to those of us looking for our first or another position.
 
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I'm done posting in this thread. My posts are self-deleted and if the option was available I would have simply deleted the whole thread. I stand firm in my thoughts that this field needs a huge revamping of how it approaches entry level coders, but those thoughts are my own to have.

I will say though that I do not appreciate the endless stream of negative personal messages sent to me in an anonymous fashion. If you click on the "User CP" icon at the top of the page you can see comments given to you by anonymous forum users. I just figured out how to use it. :rolleyes:

Have a good week everyone.
 
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twizzle

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I'm done posting in this thread. My posts are self-deleted and if the option was available I would have simply deleted the whole thread. I stand firm in my thoughts that this field needs a huge revamping of how it approaches entry level coders, but those thoughts are my own to have.

I will say though that I do not appreciate the endless stream of negative personal messages sent to me in an anonymous fashion. If you click on the "User CP" icon at the top of the page you can see comments given to you by anonymous forum users. I just figured out how to use it. :rolleyes:

Have a good week everyone.
To those who've been cowardly enough to send messages anonymously, if you've got something to say, at least be adult-enough to identify who you are, otherwise go away. We may disagree with some comments, but at least we're not afraid to share them.
 

mhstrauss

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To those who've been cowardly enough to send messages anonymously, if you've got something to say, at least be adult-enough to identify who you are, otherwise go away. We may disagree with some comments, but at least we're not afraid to share them.
Is this the "private message" function? Or something different?
 

twizzle

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Is this the "private message" function? Or something different?
Are you asking about the private message because you don't know about it or are you saying I shouldn't be criticizing people for being anonymous and sending disagreeable messages via private messages?
Your post is rather ambiguous.
 

mhstrauss

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Are you asking about the private message because you don't know about it or are you saying I shouldn't be criticizing people for being anonymous and sending disagreeable messages via private messages?
Your post is rather ambiguous.
I'm asking because I've never seen an "anonymous message" function...the only thing I see is "private message". I'm not criticizing at all, just trying to understand what the OP was referring to. Sorry for not being clear.
 

mitchellde

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I'm asking because I've never seen an "anonymous message" function...the only thing I see is "private message". I'm not criticizing at all, just trying to understand what the OP was referring to. Sorry for not being clear.
Meagan, they are referring to the reputation icon. If you click on the reputation icon and you disagree with a post you must leave a comment indicating why you disagree. There is no way to know who it is that is the one disagreeing as there is no way to indicate who you are.
 

mhstrauss

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Meagan, they are referring to the reputation icon. If you click on the reputation icon and you disagree with a post you must leave a comment indicating why you disagree. There is no way to know who it is that is the one disagreeing as there is no way to indicate who you are.
Jeez.

Thanks Debra!!
 

twizzle

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I'm asking because I've never seen an "anonymous message" function...the only thing I see is "private message". I'm not criticizing at all, just trying to understand what the OP was referring to. Sorry for not being clear.
Meagan. I sent you a PM
 
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Now i can agree with you on people that started working in coding in the 90's. It was much easier because they got anybody willing to learn and trained them from the bottom up. (100% Fact, ive heard lots of ppl that got their start that way). I will say this and some people dont realize this...... When it comes to coding, Hospitals will Outsource the work overseas (India) and the coders there in some cases have little to no exp. I have researched and most enrolled in a crash course in coding. (I understand they will work for less $$).My Point is that here in the U.S its not acceptable to train people that are willing to learn coding and build them up. When we outsource im not sure if we verify the coder's to see if they have years of Exp, Even Inpatient Charts are outsourced as well.
Hello AB87,

I think something may be wrong with my private message function. I replied to you a few times in different ways, but still my "sent messages" folder still says 0.

You were 100% correct about the place where I took the exam. :D I thought it was next to impossible that you knew the particular dermatology practice in Orlando where it was done, but you were correct.

I would love to say the name of the practice, but I don't know the legality of doing that on a public forum (especially on a thread now viewed by almost 4,000 people). But I am glad I am not alone in my thinking of that proficiency test being at least a little bit bogus.

If my pm's aren't going through and you want to discuss it more we can do so via my email, which is my user name above.
 

AB87

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I got your message. Mine did the same with the sent message of 0, i think i sent you a repeat of my last comment
 
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