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I passed my CPMA exam last year but did not start auditing until recently. My boss is requesting a summary, graphs, physician feed back etc.. Needless to say she was not happy with my presentation. With that being said, can you guys recommend anything that can assist me? Free tools, examples of your audits anything helps. I would really love a mentor if possible.
 

medicalauditor

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I passed my CPMA exam last year but did not start auditing until recently. My boss is requesting a summary, graphs, physician feed back etc.. Needless to say she was not happy with my presentation. With that being said, can you guys recommend anything that can assist me? Free tools, examples of your audits anything helps. I would really love a mentor if possible.
I recently passed my CPMA too and will start auditing soon. The only way you can get summary, graphs, physician feed-back etc., without spending hours on each audit, is to invest in a software. So if your boss wants it all, hopefully he/she will be willing to give you the tools to do it. AAPC has a software listed called Audit Manager from Healthicity. Its great but can be slightly expensive, depending on what your budget is. To start with, look into Intelicode. It will give you a basic summary, errors and issues, accuracy rates etc.
 

medicalauditor

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I disagree entirely with this statement. Learn to use Excel.
memorialhermann14 How are you currently tracking the results of your audits?
I do use excel, thank you. - please read my response entirely, I said the 'speed' with which you can audit will vary greatly if you use a software and that is true. You can use excel to audit, but you will still have to type in a summary, which is the cover letter that goes with the issue-oriented findings, the provider education, etc. Not just the reports, a software also makes it easier and faster to level E/M and many other things. It lets you build a database with provider information, fee schedules, patient information and many many other things that I can't list here. Some software also runs NCCI edits for you. So the point is, that you can audit a lot faster and therefore it is realistic to be able to provide summaries and analytics and provider feed-back for every audit that you do.
 

Tami_F

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I do use excel, thank you. - please read my response entirely, I said the 'speed' with which you can audit will vary greatly if you use a software and that is true. You can use excel to audit, but you will still have to type in a summary, which is the cover letter that goes with the issue-oriented findings, the provider education, etc. Not just the reports, a software also makes it easier and faster to level E/M and many other things. It lets you build a database with provider information, fee schedules, patient information and many many other things that I can't list here. Some software also runs NCCI edits for you. So the point is, that you can audit a lot faster and therefore it is realistic to be able to provide summaries and analytics and provider feed-back for every audit that you do.
I read your reply. Excel is a tool that's accessible to almost everyone. Many practices do not have the resources to purchase expensive software, and this poster's question specifically asks about "free tools". Excel is what I would recommend as the best place to start, as I said. It can do much more than basic graphs.
 
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