Hepatitis ICD-10

MCook

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I'm trying to get a better grasp on ICD-10 codes for Hepatitis. I'm specifically looking for clarification on the following:

Hepatitis B surface antigen positive - Does this indicate the patient is a carrier?
Hepatitis B DNA suppressed - Does this indicate the patient is a carrier or is this coded as chronic?
Hepatitis C SVR or Hepatitis C eradicated - I am finding mixed information on coding these as chronic and personal history.

I'm hoping someone can point me to a good reference. I have been looking for solid information all week including Coding Clinics but I'm not finding that "golden reference" that will answer my questions!

Thanks in advance!
Michelle
 
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I'm trying to get a better grasp on ICD-10 codes for Hepatitis. I'm specifically looking for clarification on the following:

Hepatitis B surface antigen positive - Does this indicate the patient is a carrier?
Hepatitis B DNA suppressed - Does this indicate the patient is a carrier or is this coded as chronic?
Hepatitis C SVR or Hepatitis C eradicated - I am finding mixed information on coding these as chronic and personal history.

I'm hoping someone can point me to a good reference. I have been looking for solid information all week including Coding Clinics but I'm not finding that "golden reference" that will answer my questions!

Thanks in advance!
Michelle

HepB surface antigen (HBsAg) is a blood test to check if a patient has HepB. If the test is positive, that means the patient currently has HepB, is infectious, and is contagious via blood. It does not indicate if it's chronic or acute.

HepB DNA suppressed - there's a lot of science-y stuff with this one, but basically what it means is that the patient currently has chronic HepB, they are receiving treatment, and they are responding to the treatment, meaning they're not getting WORSE.

HepC SVR / Eradicated - in this case, the patient had HepC, underwent anti-viral treatment, and the HepC infection is no longer detectable in their blood. SVR "sustained virologic response" is a measurement that says it's been 2 years and the patient has still not had any detectable HepC in their body, which then gives the green light to say the virus has been eradicated from that patient (aka cured). I can't say 100% whether this is a chronic or acute situation.
In this case, the patient DID have HepC, but it's no longer detectable in the blood, and enough time has passed that they believe the virus is completely gone. If it indicates "SVR" or "eradicated" on the documentation, it'd be "history of."
 
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