Need feedback ASAP!!!!

bundydelly

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I have an interview in a few hours for a coding position. I became certified questions year ago, and this would be my 1st coding job if I get it. What would be a reasonable wage to ask for? Is $15 too low, or would I be ok asking for more?

Thank you
 

espressoguy

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It really would have been better to do your research before this. You should never bring up salary during an initial interview. If the interviewer brings it up during the interview, you might ask what the salary range for the position is.

The problem with asking for a specific wage without knowing the range for the position is you could be asking for too much or possibly leaving money on the table.

In some parts of the country $15/hour might be a great wage. In the Seattle area (where I live) that is ridiculously low. In fact, Seattle is gradually phasing in a $15/hour minimum wage. At least one city in the area already has a $15/hour minimum wage.
 

hperry10

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I was advised by my coding instructor that $15 - $20 per hour is the average starting rate in my area ( southeastern MA) for a coder with no experience, however have seen jobs listed in my area for coders advertising wages as low at $13 per hour.
 

bundydelly

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It really would have been better to do your research before this. You should never bring up salary during an initial interview. If the interviewer brings it up during the interview, you might ask what the salary range for the position is.

The problem with asking for a specific wage without knowing the range for the position is you could be asking for too much or possibly leaving money on the table.

In some parts of the country $15/hour might be a great wage. In the Seattle area (where I live) that is ridiculously low. In fact, Seattle is gradually phasing in a $15/hour minimum wage. At least one city in the area already has a $15/hour minimum wage.


When they called me for an interview they asked what wage I was looking for. After I gave them a number I researched it and found that starting wages are higher than that. I'm currently working as an MA for less than that, but with OT I would gross more in my current position.
 

bundydelly

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I was advised by my coding instructor that $15 - $20 per hour is the average starting rate in my area ( southeastern MA) for a coder with no experience, however have seen jobs listed in my area for coders advertising wages as low at $13 per hour.


Thank you
 

bundydelly

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15
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It really would have been better to do your research before this. You should never bring up salary during an initial interview. If the interviewer brings it up during the interview, you might ask what the salary range for the position is.

The problem with asking for a specific wage without knowing the range for the position is you could be asking for too much or possibly leaving money on the table.

In some parts of the country $15/hour might be a great wage. In the Seattle area (where I live) that is ridiculously low. In fact, Seattle is gradually phasing in a $15/hour minimum wage. At least one city in the area already has a $15/hour minimum wage.

I did do some research after I spoke with them the other day, and I'm finding that here in Michigan the pay is higher than that. That's why I was asking, I don't want to ask for too little when I know that the position pays more. I'm going to ask them what the position pays, and explain to them that I did some research and found that new coders typically make more than $15 an hour.
 
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My suggestion is that you NOT focus on the fact that it's your first coding position. Focus on your skill set, your areas of expertise. Your value as a coder is directly related to your abilities and knowledge, not necessarily if you've had a formal coding position in the past. Coming from my perspective, as someone who routinely interviews and hires coders, a person's resume never explains their true capabilities. Education certainly plays a role, previous work experience (as in, is the applicant a "job hopper"), and anything else that shows a person's level of commitment. Don't shy away from how much experience you've had in training and other non-formal work experience.

Prepare yourself for the inevitable question "What can you bring to the table" or "Why should I hire you" or "What would make you a valuable asset for the company?"

And, as previously mentioned, if you're asked outright how much you expect to be paid, you should never arbitrarily toss out a dollar figure. Try to leave the salary negotiations for the end of the interview process. Check around your area for job listings that indicate how much that position would pay. I work for a large teaching facility, meaning our staff are state employees. If you have any type of facility like that somewhat nearby, within a few hundred miles give or take, check the job listings and see what the starting pay is. That will give you a pretty good idea of how much is too much to ask for. I should also note that the salaries of all state employees are published yearly for public use, for every state. So if you're digging around for salaries of coders at university hospitals, check there.

One last piece of advice, don't bring up the fact that you "checked around" or "researched" salaries. Ask what they typically offer for an entry level coding position, apply the information you previously gathered, and you'll know if they're low-balling you. If you're forced into a corner and have to come up with an amount, pick something a bit higher than the lowest wages you've come across. "Based on my extensive knowledge and training, I feel $XX would be appropriate" or something along those lines.
 
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