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I got my CPC-A last October and have been looking for a job ever since. I have had several interviews all of which say we would hire you if you had a little bit of experience!! Any suggestions????
 

HangarPilot

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The most prevalent advice is to widen your search to other jobs and "get your foot in the door" where you want to be and try to move later. For example, take a "Front Office" position at a physician practice (check-in, check-out, appointment scheduling, insurance verification) ... this gives you time to learn the business, gain experience with their software etc. and move to billing/coding later when opportunity arises (and they've gotten to know how awesome you are). Experience in the medical field is relevant, experience working in a physician office is relevant, customer service experience is relevant, and software experience is very relevant ... all good ammo for your resume!

Internships (paid or not) would be awesome but harder to find than Pokemon... ;)

A more "controversial" suggestion would be the AAPC Practicode. People tend to love it or hate it. It's expensive (unless you catch it on sale). It will reduce your requirement to have your "A" removed by 1 year and give you some practical experience. Some members feel you should be able to slap in on your resume and claim a year of work experience... I'm not inclined to think so. I feel I gained practical experience in coding things in new areas and I learned a lot. In an interview, I think those experiences would allow me to talk intelligently about areas I had no knowledge or understanding of before. I mean, instead of smiling and nodding and pretending I know what they're talking about ... I might actually be able to have meaningful conversation. I wouldn't try to claim "work experience" with it, rather list it as some kind of further training. You ARE getting interviews... so in the interview you may be able to sell the idea that you have some experience by completing it. I just don't think you can slap Practicode on your resume and have it do anything for you ... but if you can bring it up in the interview and explain what it is and what experience you gained from it ... maybe they would buy that as experience?

Practicode has a few strengths... and a whole lot of weaknesses. It could have been great. While I don't love it (it can be very frustrating at times) I think it's worth considering as a necessary evil to get you where you want to be. Let's face it, if one of those employers told you they had a really lame online training program and they would hire you if you did it ... you'd do it no matter how lame to land the job wouldn't you?

Before you order it though, check out this thread (or do a search for Practicode) and see what others think:
https://www.aapc.com/memberarea/forums/144654-practicode-job-opportunities.html
 

angeslow

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I've been in my current job position (Outpatient pediatric rehab patient coordinator) for 10 years and have plenty of experience with all types of insurances, billing, coding (mainly rehab, mind you) and have been looking for a coding position for nearly a year (since I got my CPC last November). I've applied to 9 various coding positions WITHIN the company I currently work for, and STILL...nothing. I'm trying to broaden my horizon by attending AAPC sponsored conferences, workshops, etc (and, to also earn CEU's) and am trying to keep up on changing guidelines, etc. so...when and if I ever get an interview for any of these jobs, I'm well prepared.

So. Good luck to everyone out there!
 

Serenity13

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Disillusioned

I graduated 2 years ago this past Nov. from Medtech College (which is now out of business) got certified last May-went months without employment. Took a job with General Dynamics last Dec. and am still there, but it has nothing to do with Billing and Coding, but I have to pay the bills. Was led to believe, (after $20,000 in debt) that it would be easy to get a job in Lexington, Ky. It is not - have not given up - just turned in my CEUs and pd my renewal AAPC fee, but it is very discouraging,so I know how you feel. Plus I think going on 62, is working against me. Some of my classmates have been placed, but got hired due to past Administrative Jobs and accounting experience. I had neither within the past 10 yrs, anyway. Hoping something will pop in the Spring for me. Chin up - I can relate!
 
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I just wanted to say that I applied to about 30 jobs while still in school, interviewed for 2 positions before I even took the certification exam, and got hired at a clinic before I was done with my externship. My experience sounds rare, but I just wanted to add a little hope to those still looking. It's not impossible! :eek:
 

tmagloire

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New Coder Frustration

I know how you feel. I'm frustrated because employers want you to get these degrees and certificates and once you get them, no one wants to hire you to get the experience. I am so frustrated and I'm seriously regretting this coding certification. I've applied to many, many jobs and each one says the same. I've taken courses, done practicode, removed the "A" and still, to no avail. Really disappointed at how all of this is set up. I apologize, I know I'm venting, but I am really, really, disappointed and frustrated about this.
 

Intent

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Position available

I posted a job for on site CPC in frisco tx to the job boards today if anyone is interested in sending their resume
 

simam

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Dear friends,
I just read some negative remarks and saw frustration among many on these posts.
Ok lets talk what sell .
Success never comes from frustration and negativity
Success comes from positive mind, right attitude and improving the area which may cause blockage in getting the job.
After getting certification we all worked hard it means we had enough courage and brain to pass this and learn at job then what is stopping is our own negative self which does nothing except wasting time and energy .


BE POSITIVE AND LOOK AT YOUR RESUME , LOOK AT YOUR INTERVIEW STRATEGY , LOOK AT YOUR JOB SEARCH TECHNIQUE AND MANY MORE
EVERYONE GETS SUCCESS WHO KNOWS HOW TO GET SUCCESS
 

hperry10

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Dear friends,
I just read some negative remarks and saw frustration among many on these posts.
Ok lets talk what sell .
Success never comes from frustration and negativity
Success comes from positive mind, right attitude and improving the area which may cause blockage in getting the job.
After getting certification we all worked hard it means we had enough courage and brain to pass this and learn at job then what is stopping is our own negative self which does nothing except wasting time and energy .


BE POSITIVE AND LOOK AT YOUR RESUME , LOOK AT YOUR INTERVIEW STRATEGY , LOOK AT YOUR JOB SEARCH TECHNIQUE AND MANY MORE
EVERYONE GETS SUCCESS WHO KNOWS HOW TO GET SUCCESS

Excellent advice simam!
 

bungy

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dont be discouraged and keep moving

I got my CPC-A last October and have been looking for a job ever since. I have had several interviews all of which say we would hire you if you had a little bit of experience!! Any suggestions????
There are a lot of good advice on here. you are doing a good thing by reaching out and asking for advice, we all help each other when we have the opportunity to do so. this forum is not any different.

here is my 2 cents from my own experience. I am a guy so you know.

keep moving and do something new every day in the process of searching. update resume, ask a question find a new site, figure out this site is a scammer and don't look there again, find out this site is good and keep looking there. but achieve baby steps.

volunteer in big hospitals in HIM dept. I did but I didn't find possibility of work there because they asked for CCS and not CPC but this will get experience under your belt.

reach out for temp agencies. some are specialized in medical and the easiest thing is to place in a clerical position to get your foot in the door and say that you have worked in a clinic or a hospital

if you are guy, it doesn't help in getting a front desk position but you can't do anything about that, just work harder on your search.

if you live in a small community, you going to have to move. search in the largest community that you are willing to move to

hospitals are hard to work at, they ask for the most experience but keep looking and applying there. I have seen the weirdest unexplained hiring patterns there, minorities are welcome

if you go to interview and they don't hire you, offer to volunteer there. nothing more than 6 hours a week.

go to your local AAPC chapter meeting and ask the chapter people to talk before every meeting for 30 seconds. ask if anyone knows any opportunists in their immediate work for volunteer or for billing coding work position. people will get to know your face and they will remember if something came up in their world


start search agents on all the big hospitals websites and on indeed.com

best of luck, keep on being positive
 

terrigst

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experience

if you have the time, volunteer in the field to gain experience. Try some online companies that may hire you. Don't give up. Look for billing jobs as well because this is experience or can lead to experience.
 

doctordrakeramoray

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if you have the time, volunteer in the field to gain experience. Try some online companies that may hire you. Don't give up. Look for billing jobs as well because this is experience or can lead to experience.
Yeah this is horrible advice.

Don’t ever, ever, ever work for free. Nothing is worth that.
 
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I feel your frustration

I got my CPC-A last October and have been looking for a job ever since. I have had several interviews all of which say we would hire you if you had a little bit of experience!! Any suggestions????
I too have my CPC-A since May 2016 and had several interviews myself, all to tell me your resume is outstanding and your work history superb; however yes here it comes you don't have the experience were looking for. I have not given up keeping my certification ongoing cause I am still determined to get a coding job. Currently I work in a healthcare environment LVHN and hoping that once I got my foot in the door opportunities would arise for me to get my dream job of coding. So all I can say is just don't give up. I'm much older than you and I always try to keep positive and discard the negativities. Try maybe something with a Lab environment just to get your feet wet and go from there. I had a 4mo short term position for HNL and it was all lab coding unfortunately it didn't last any longer than that. Best of luck !!!!!
 

Mayzoo

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if you have the time, volunteer in the field to gain experience. Try some online companies that may hire you. Don't give up. Look for billing jobs as well because this is experience or can lead to experience.
I agree. Billing, front desk work, externships, internships, or volunteer--anything that gets you the experience required to kick start your new career. IMO, a good career is worth the extra effort, even if that includes working for a short time period for free to gain valuable experience.

I not only did not get paid for my experience--I paid out to gain my experience. I bought and completed the practicode module to remove my A status. Within three weeks of having my A removed, I was hired for a remote, full time position. It was absolutely worth the effort and funds I spent.
 

JCaillouet

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Volunteer.

The volunteer without pay you may not 'find' many who take you up on that opportunity but..find what you 'can' to get your foot in the door.
 

doctordrakeramoray

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You guys need to stop suggesting that people volunteer or intern; it is reckless and irresponsible.

One, I’d assume most of us need to provide for ourselves and our family, as well as make money to support the things we enjoy doing outside of work. Two, you’re just giving all of the myopic coding managers more power over new coders. If people keep taking unpaid positions, they’re going to keep offering them.

Do not ever work for free, period. You are worth so much more.
 

Mayzoo

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You guys need to stop suggesting that people volunteer or intern; it is reckless and irresponsible.

One, I’d assume most of us need to provide for ourselves and our family, as well as make money to support the things we enjoy doing outside of work. Two, you’re just giving all of the myopic coding managers more power over new coders. If people keep taking unpaid positions, they’re going to keep offering them.

Do not ever work for free, period. You are worth so much more.
Most of us who recommend it, know it works. I am gainfully employed in this field after paying for my experience.

How many people do you know who repeatedly are told they do not have enough experience magically gain experience the longer they remain unemployed? The further from your certification date, the harder it will become to gain employment in this field without altering your circumstances. Repeatedly applying and repeatedly being turned down does not gain you any experience in coding or the medical field. In this case, being stubborn hurts only the person choosing to be stubborn (and their family).

Many fields require free work to gain experience prior to employment. I guess doctors, PT, pharmacists etc are all wasting their time by working without pay during their work experience/schooling?

My effort was absolutely worth the time and money. I will absolutely continue to recommend what works so people can become gainfully employed in their chosen field. THAT is what helps people and their families most. No one wins by sitting on the sidelines watching the time, and ones hard earned knowledge disappear while one is either unemployed or employed outside their chosen field. Being stagnant is very frustrating, especially after paying for school in the hopes of gaining a job in that field.

It took me 3 week after finishing Practicode to become gainfully employed in this field. How long did it take you to become employed in this field after passing your exam and beginning your search and did you start with no experience?
 

doctordrakeramoray

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Most of us who recommend it, know it works. I am gainfully employed in this field after paying for my experience.

How many people do you know who repeatedly are told they do not have enough experience magically gain experience the longer they remain unemployed? The further from your certification date, the harder it will become to gain employment in this field without altering your circumstances. Repeatedly applying and repeatedly being turned down does not gain you any experience in coding or the medical field. In this case, being stubborn hurts only the person choosing to be stubborn (and their family).

Many fields require free work to gain experience prior to employment. I guess doctors, PT, pharmacists etc are all wasting their time by working without pay during their work experience/schooling?

My effort was absolutely worth the time and money. I will absolutely continue to recommend what works so people can become gainfully employed in their chosen field. THAT is what helps people and their families most. No one wins by sitting on the sidelines watching the time, and ones hard earned knowledge disappear while one is either unemployed or employed outside their chosen field. Being stagnant is very frustrating, especially after paying for school in the hopes of gaining a job in that field.

It took me 3 week after finishing Practicode to become gainfully employed in this field. How long did it take you to become employed in this field after passing your exam and beginning your search and did you start with no experience?
My point is that the system is garbage, is broken, and needs change. People volunteering to work for free to appease the short-sighted old people who work in coding management is not going to change that system.

I don’t have a coding position, and I’d much rather fail and not get one than work for free and become a corporate sellout, as you seem to have.

You can defend the “secret society” nature of coding departments all you want, but eventually the people they keep recycling through for these jobs will retire, and they’ll be left with nobody because they’re too short-sighted and/or stupid to realize that people are intelligent enough to code and learn how to code without prior experience.
 
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Steph_Cecchini

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Have you seen CoderScore?

CompetentSee is a new company that powers CoderScore. CoderScore is a credit score equivalent for a medical coder’s skills. It serves as a predictor of how well they will perform on the job, which gives employers savings in recruiting costs and gives coders a new tool to compete for the jobs they want.

Stephanie
 

Mayzoo

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My point is that the system is garbage, is broken, and needs change. People volunteering to work for free to appease the short-sighted old people who work in coding management is not going to change that system.

I don’t have a coding position, and I’d much rather fail and not get one than work for free and become a corporate sellout, as you seem to have.

You can defend the “secret society” nature of coding departments all you want, but eventually the people they keep recycling through for these jobs will retire, and they’ll be left with nobody because they’re too short-sighted and/or stupid to realize that people are intelligent enough to code and learn how to code without prior experience.
Maybe becoming gainfully employed in the field I went to school for was more vital to me because I alone paid my own way. No one paid my course fees, books, etc for me, so my motivation to finish what I started was very high. If successfully completing my goals, all on my own, makes me a "corporate sellout", then I am a gainfully employed, and happy, remote-working "sellout" :D. How you got there is a mystery to me, but hey no worries.

Regardless, we all have our own reasons for choosing or accepting our life paths. If you are content with where you are in life right now, that is awesome!! That is all any of us can ask/hope for anyway.

My recommendations are for those who are seeking advice to change their circumstances, so I share what worked for me and has worked for so many others wanting to improve/change their circumstances. Gaining experience prior to obtaining your dream job (and sometimes prior to a paying job) is fairly common in numerous fields, especially the medical field. Some folks are willing to "earn our stripes", and some folks are not.
 
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Mayzoo

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A few more tips for anyone trying to get a job in today's market:

Bare in mind many employers check your social media feeds now. Read your own social media feeds and see if anything on there shows a negative/offensive attitude or behaviour that is typically considered undesirable to employers (ie ethical, legal, or moral concerns). Many medical positions come with ethics clauses attached to them, so you must be as vigilant about your online persona as your in person persona.

What email address are you using for your job search? Does it sound professional, cutesy or worse--offensive?

When someone calls, and you do not know who it is, do you answer the phone in a professional and courteous manner?

If you want to be considered a professional, you must present yourself as one in person and online. Medical coding is a professional field with a great deal of responsibility and ethical considerations attached to it. Companies want to hire people who will be an asset to them, not a liability.
 
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doctordrakeramoray

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Maybe becoming gainfully employed in the field I went to school for was more vital to me because I alone paid my own way. No one paid my course fees, books, etc for me, so my motivation to finish what I started was very high. If successfully completing my goals, all on my own, makes me a "corporate sellout", then I am a gainfully employed, and happy, remote-working "sellout" :D. How you got there is a mystery to me, but hey no worries.

Regardless, we all have our own reasons for choosing or accepting our life paths. If you are content with where you are in life right now, that is awesome!! That is all any of us can ask/hope for anyway.

My recommendations are for those who are seeking advice to change their circumstances, so I share what worked for me and has worked for so many others wanting to improve/change their circumstances. Gaining experience prior to obtaining your dream job (and sometimes prior to a paying job) is fairly common in numerous fields, especially the medical field. Some folks are willing to "earn our stripes", and some folks are not.
Nice, thanks for completely skipping over my point and injecting more useless cliches and platitudes into the discussion that provide no substantive help to anybody. I’m sure everyone appreciates it.

Talent over tenure. Never work for free.
 

JCaillouet

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Nice, thanks for completely skipping over my point and injecting more useless cliches and platitudes into the discussion that provide no substantive help to anybody. I’m sure everyone appreciates it.

Talent over tenure. Never work for free.
Can you 'not' browbeat or smack down someone offering what worked for them? Just...can you not?

Some people are able to volunteer. Others are able to claw their way 'up' by taking in starter jobs and proving their value.

We're all supposed to be helping each other here. You're the one smacking down others who choose to help or offer advice.
 

doctordrakeramoray

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Can you 'not' browbeat or smack down someone offering what worked for them? Just...can you not?

Some people are able to volunteer. Others are able to claw their way 'up' by taking in starter jobs and proving their value.

We're all supposed to be helping each other here. You're the one smacking down others who choose to help or offer advice.
Because you’re all enabling a system in which unqualified coding mangers can hold disproportionate amounts of power over prospective employees, treat us like unintelligent trash, and force us to proverbially come crawling on hands and knees, begging for a job that we earned the right to apply for. Given the amount of money being circulated in this industry, there is absolutely no justification for offering unpaid positions under the guise of “building experience”.

Look at all the people who post with the same issue...and it doesn’t occur to you that maybe the system is broken and could use some reform? This is not normal.
 

JCaillouet

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Because you’re all enabling a system in which unqualified coding mangers can hold disproportionate amounts of power over prospective employees, treat us like unintelligent trash, and force us to proverbially come crawling on hands and knees, begging for a job that we earned the right to apply for. Given the amount of money being circulated in this industry, there is absolutely no justification for offering unpaid positions under the guise of “building experience”.

Look at all the people who post with the same issue...and it doesn’t occur to you that maybe the system is broken and could use some reform? This is not normal.
You call me out for enabling then you don't offer a positive suggestion. See where people may have problems?
 

doctordrakeramoray

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You call me out for enabling then you don't offer a positive suggestion. See where people may have problems?
The problem is that you’re clearly an incredibly dense individual (whether willfully or otherwise) with a rudimentary grasp of reading comprehension.

I’ve very clearly stated what I think the solution is. Replace unqualified coding managers with people who don’t need everything spelled out for them to identify talent. Stop being cheap with regards to training and give prospective new coders a chance to hone their skills instead of recycling the same pool of people. Stop forcing newly certified coders to work for free when there are billions of dollars being circulated throughout this industry. Consider a prospective employee’s potential instead of reducing them to what’s on their resume because the hiring managers are too short sighted or stupid to think critically. Is that clear enough for you bro?
 

Mayzoo

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In EVERY industry, those hiring hold all the power. In EVERY industry what is on your resume is what gains you an interview or not. In every industry you have your resume and maybe a 10 + min interview to wow the person hiring. In every industry, experience trumps inexperience. The way the system has always worked is those with less/no experience start at the bottom for a reduced, or no wage, to gain the paramount experience so they may become more choosy and higher paid. I have been a hiring manager in two other fields, so I understand how that system works. You do not have to like how the hiring process unfolds, but understanding it is critical and railing against it is fruitless. I do not know anyone who "likes" looking for a job. I very much dislike looking for a job. Another good reason I do my best to make the process as short and productive as possible.

***********************************************************************************************************

To those looking for a job: Do not give up, and try to not get bitter. Negativity will not gain you what you want. Do whatever you feel comfortable doing to get you what you want. I paid for the course and the practicode, and they paid off wonderfully for me. I would readily chose the path I choose again.
 
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doctordrakeramoray

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In EVERY industry, those hiring hold all the power. In EVERY industry what is on your resume is what gains you an interview or not. In every industry you have your resume and maybe a 10 + min interview to wow the person hiring. In every industry, experience trumps inexperience. The way the system has always worked is those with less/no experience start at the bottom for a reduced, or no wage, to gain the paramount experience so they may become more choosy and higher paid. I have been a hiring manager in two other fields, so I understand how that system works. You do not have to like how the hiring process unfolds, but understanding it is critical and railing against it is fruitless. I do not know anyone who "likes" looking for a job. I very much dislike looking for a job. Another good reason I do my best to make the process as short and productive as possible.

***********************************************************************************************************

To those looking for a job: Do not give up, and try to not get bitter. Negativity will not gain you what you want. Do whatever you feel comfortable doing to get you what you want. I paid for the course and the practicode, and they paid off wonderfully for me. I would readily chose the path I choose again.
Ah yes, the age old “this is the way it’s been, no use looking to see if it’s outdated and could use improving” argument. Again, your pro-employer rhetoric is irresponsible.

You very clearly sacrificed all of your integrity to get hired, and in turn become a parrot that shouts their garbage platitudes about picking yourself up by the bootstraps and “paying your dues”. Get out of here with that. Stop defending your employers at every turn, they don’t care about any of us.
 

cgaston

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Are you just going to continue venting your contempt for "the system" to the posters here? Which, by the way, does not seem like a good use of your time or resources.

If you want to change "the system" you should be contacting people with the power to change it, not lashing out to random posters on an internet message board who come here to try to help people.
 

twizzle

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No experience

Are you just going to continue venting your contempt for "the system" to the posters here? Which, by the way, does not seem like a good use of your time or resources.

If you want to change "the system" you should be contacting people with the power to change it, not lashing out to random posters on an internet message board who come here to try to help people.
Couldn't agree more Carol. This forum is not for those who seek to lash out at others; it is for providing useful information which you clearly cannot do..

If you've nothing constructive to say, say nothing and quit the negativity. Your attitude is not appropriate for this forum, or any other for that matter.

The system needs changing....I get that. Do something about it.
 

JCaillouet

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The problem is that you’re clearly an incredibly dense individual (whether willfully or otherwise) with a rudimentary grasp of reading comprehension.

I’ve very clearly stated what I think the solution is. Replace unqualified coding managers with people who don’t need everything spelled out for them to identify talent. Stop being cheap with regards to training and give prospective new coders a chance to hone their skills instead of recycling the same pool of people. Stop forcing newly certified coders to work for free when there are billions of dollars being circulated throughout this industry. Consider a prospective employee’s potential instead of reducing them to what’s on their resume because the hiring managers are too short sighted or stupid to think critically. Is that clear enough for you bro?
Actually ..'Bro'

1) I do have amazing reading comprehension.

2) You want providers to stop being 'cheap' when they hire employees? Lobby. Be passionate. Argue about what is going on. Instead you're on here randomly harassing people trying to help others.

3) Your actions are more 'trollish' than anything else that I've seen, and I'm currently following the Vic Mignogna scandal on Twitter.

4) Your actions are a trademark of whom you are. You claim to champion those with no experience however you're:
*Rude
*Offensive
*Resort to childish tantrums.

Were I anyone with a position of power, I'd be less inclined to listen to you. You're spiting the cause you champion. Which makes me wonder.

5) Are you doing this deliberately?
 

Jad2018

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Volunteering

How does this work? Must admit that I have been in one particular field for over 20 years and I only have to apply to get an interview and offer for a job in nursing. So I don’t know how to go about offering to volunteer but for a couple hours a day I would be willing to get in the door. If someone would be willing to post a “how to” I would appreciate it!!
I am testing in April, so I not officially certified but it’s not far away. Would love to have a plan of action ready.
Thanks in advance!
 

ErikAZ

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How does this work? Must admit that I have been in one particular field for over 20 years and I only have to apply to get an interview and offer for a job in nursing. So I don’t know how to go about offering to volunteer but for a couple hours a day I would be willing to get in the door. If someone would be willing to post a “how to” I would appreciate it!!
I am testing in April, so I not officially certified but it’s not far away. Would love to have a plan of action ready.
Thanks in advance!
You could try volunteering in a hospital HIM department. I hired a coder a couple years ago who volunteered, then was hired in HIM doing prep, scan, and index, so we knew her work ethic. When an ED coding opportunity opened up she was hired. Most people need to support their families so a regular job doing whatever is necessary until you can get your foot in the door. Most places are not going to hire a coder with no experience (not all but most won't). From a hospital standpoint all our coders work remotely and we really don't have anyone in the office to train people so we're stuck hiring experienced coders only. I'd love to be able to hire new coders but training them and auditing their work at 100% until satisfactory just isn't feasible.
 

loshriver

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new

I have been applying as well, but no response yet. But, I have a positive attitude that I would eventually get a response. I just keep applying to new openings in the area that I live in. There a openings that will accept a CPC-A. Hope all works out for you!:eek:
 

Pathos

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It has been my experience that getting a new job is often about timing and "making the cut". Companies normally go through hiring and firing seasons throughout the year, and may have the right job for you or your job is not yet available. I have been incredibly lucky to have worked for an organization who trained and paid for my CPC examination, and allowed me to work enough so I could get my -A removed. Not all companies are that generous, however here are some pointers/ideas from me:

1) Be professional - When I realized it was time for me to get a new job, I sent applications like crazy. I made sure my resume/CV was smooth, professional, and personalized for each position/company I was applying to. Yes, that meant I had to tweak the introduction and highlight experiences/skills that pertained to the position I was applying for. Try not to send out a generalized resume, as most HR/recruiters will recognize your lack of effort and your resume will already have an uphill battle of making that first cut. I have often asked select people I trust professionally to look over my resume/CV, and asked them what I could do to enhance it.

2) Be consistent - Once that is done, don't hold back and flood your local market, consider companies that might be a commute away, or even moving for the right job. I live on the West Coast, and applied locally, statewide, out of state like Texas, Minnesota, ND/SD. I did notice that the more I applied for jobs, the better I became at it. I felt my interviewing skills being honed as I completed them. Although I still abhor the job hunting part, having good job finding skills is becoming more and more important as jobs become less and less permanent, or require other job movement.

3) Be resilient - As your rejections come in, and they inevitably will, try not to be too discouraged. Remember that the job hunting is all a learning process. Even if you did everything 100% perfect and couldn't have done anything different, you might still not get that job you applied for. The reasons can be numerous, but the worst thing you can do now is taking the rejection personal. Pick yourself up and go to the next job posting!

4) Network and remember your manners - This skill is also on the rise, probably more so than ever before. Leave good impressions where ever you go, whether its from a job interview you didn't get (remember that follow up Thank you Card), to instructors or hiring managers you haven't worked for yet (perhaps from job events). Maybe you already have a job in an organization, but want to impress the hiring manager in the Coding department; start by reaching out to that person and show your intentions. That person might also give you some pointers what they are looking for, and what you would need to do in order to work for them.

Medical Coding was not a passion of mine, until I really started doing it. I really came into this industry in a very round-about way, however I wouldn't trade it for anything. All of my job experiences have inevitably lead up to the job I have now, and I have only started building my career.
 

Cavalier40

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While I do not so much agree with @doctordrakemoray's tone, I do agree with his premise. There is no communication between the industry and the professional organizations which train its employees. AAPCs certification process is set up to allow for entry level coders and also to differentiate those new in the industry from those with at least some practical experience. However either the industry itself has not adapted to the blueprint laid out by AAPC, or AAPC has not properly prepared their members for gainful entry into the job market. I see countless people complain about not getting a job in the field because they want experience they cannot get without being employed. This creates a barrier to employment which is frustrating and which I believe AAPC has done little to address.

While I understand the idea of volunteering, I do not find it productive and forward moving. To me its tantamount to highly trained musicians being asked to play for the "exposure" when the venue just wants to be cheap. (As a classical musician, I see this constantly) It is also not practical for a majority of those in the job market. Unless an unpaid internship is part of the overall education as a coder, the comparison to physicians does not hold water.

I have also experienced difficulty in finding employment due to lack of experience even though I have led revenue cycle departments for the past 5 years of several facilities, many with revenues over $10 million annually. I have been through intense audits and even mediation with insurance companies, but since I did not have experience in a particular scope of practice, my macro experience in the revenue cycle was not good enough. I have also been laughed out of an interview for a revenue cycle director position because I am a CPB instead of a CPC. (Another area where AAPC's lack of education of their certifications to the industry has been lacking) So yes there is a bit of bitterness and reevaluation of the value of my credential after being forced to take a nearly 70% pay cut just to be employed.

I honestly do not know what the solution may be, but I do think AAPC should at the forefront in the lobbying for change. People are not going to continue to pay for membership, credentials and CEUs if they feel as if they are getting no value. I cannot see the value for those who are waiting sometimes years to break into the industry. I know that I am letting my membership and certification lapse this June because I feel as if I paid out much more than I have gained.
 

Pathos

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While I do not so much agree with @doctordrakemoray's tone, I do agree with his premise. There is no communication between the industry and the professional organizations which train its employees. AAPCs certification process is set up to allow for entry level coders and also to differentiate those new in the industry from those with at least some practical experience. However either the industry itself has not adapted to the blueprint laid out by AAPC, or AAPC has not properly prepared their members for gainful entry into the job market. I see countless people complain about not getting a job in the field because they want experience they cannot get without being employed. This creates a barrier to employment which is frustrating and which I believe AAPC has done little to address.

While I understand the idea of volunteering, I do not find it productive and forward moving. To me its tantamount to highly trained musicians being asked to play for the "exposure" when the venue just wants to be cheap. (As a classical musician, I see this constantly) It is also not practical for a majority of those in the job market. Unless an unpaid internship is part of the overall education as a coder, the comparison to physicians does not hold water.

I have also experienced difficulty in finding employment due to lack of experience even though I have led revenue cycle departments for the past 5 years of several facilities, many with revenues over $10 million annually. I have been through intense audits and even mediation with insurance companies, but since I did not have experience in a particular scope of practice, my macro experience in the revenue cycle was not good enough. I have also been laughed out of an interview for a revenue cycle director position because I am a CPB instead of a CPC. (Another area where AAPC's lack of education of their certifications to the industry has been lacking) So yes there is a bit of bitterness and reevaluation of the value of my credential after being forced to take a nearly 70% pay cut just to be employed.

I honestly do not know what the solution may be, but I do think AAPC should at the forefront in the lobbying for change. People are not going to continue to pay for membership, credentials and CEUs if they feel as if they are getting no value. I cannot see the value for those who are waiting sometimes years to break into the industry. I know that I am letting my membership and certification lapse this June because I feel as if I paid out much more than I have gained
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While I am not a hiring manager and would not be able to make those types of decisions, I am not blind to the problems you bring up. While I have been lucky, I recognize the same paradox of "Can't get hired because I don't have enough experience, but I can't get experience because I can't get the job I want".

One previous poster suggested some answers to this, which could be boiled down to one word: "Lobby". reach out to AAPC, AHIMA, and other organizations you think might make the difference. Change won't happen overnight, but has to start somewhere.

Also, from what you are sharing with the attitude of some interviewers, perhaps you should expand your area of where you are applying. I have had some really good interviews, and some really bad interviews. The hope of job interviews is for both parties to get a sample of the type of person(s) and environment offered. If those interviewers blatantly laughed at you, then you might have just dodged a bullet there. The jobs I have been successful at (interviewing and job performance), have showed mutual respect and professionalism. Not every company/manager is created equal and I am assuming you already know this, just know there are some really good ones out there.

I get it. Being rejected outright sucks, and you do have to do what's best for you. And I agree that it would be very difficult to outright volunteer (unpaid) for something coding related, especially if you have financial responsibilities (which most of us have). If you are still interested in Coding, my advice would be to not give up yet and expand your horizon as much as you can. The jobs are out there, you just need to find them and at the right time.

Hope this is somewhat helpful.
 
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