one year work experience, so no one will hire me

pluto315

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I only have one year experience but I am certified, I am thinking I made a mistake to go into coding, because there are no jobs for entry level coders, any ideas????? Although I love coding I would hate to leave the field.
Thanks for any feed back.
 

bettinadodd

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My thread is immediately above yours, and expresses some of the same concerns. Those who responded to me had some encouraging words which might be helpful to you as well. As there are simply no jobs within 100 miles of where I live, I am trying to get a volunteer position in a medical records unit of one of our local hospitals, hoping that this will be a useful way of networking. Everyone I have communicated with seems to think that networking is the key. Other than that, I am in complete sympathy with you. The distant bright light in all this seems to be that by 2013 all coders will need to be certified for ICD-10, and the demand for us will be realized then - for right now, though, my patience is running thin, too. Best of luck to you (if you don't live in central Virginia like me, there's still hope!)
 
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I'm completing a Professional Medical Coding class at the end of August and have signed up to take the CPC exam in September. I live in western NH and am experiencing the same thing--employers want experienced coders. To gain coding experience, some of my classmates are volunteering. I'm sorry I don't have any suggestions for you, but I can tell you there are lots of us in the same situation as you are... Everyone keeps telling me not to give up, to apply for anything I'm qualified for so I can "get my foot in the door".

Good luck!
 

hopepg

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Try to find work doing AR follow up, charge entry, receipt posting, medical records..... with a practice or billing company...then work from there learning that practice specialty or that billing company's clients.
Then when you see job openings for coders where you currently work, you'd might be more than likely be 1st pick since you are already employed there.
It might sound like the backwards way to do it, but that's what I did. I still work in AR follow up a little (which I love) but now I get to code for providers. I make sure things are in order before the claim goes out the door & have to work denials on the back end....when the info was right there in the record to begin with.
Hang in there!
 

eadun2000

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I became certified in April, past the test first time. I also have a college degree, but I do not have any experience working in the medical field. I am basically over educated and under qualified. I have been job hunting now for 3 months and no one will even give me an interview. I even went to a couple of temp agencies and they also want 2 years experience just to temp. I feel like I have been riped off by what I call "the coding scam." There is advertising everywhere to become a coder, "what a great job", when all they want is your money, they don't care about whether or not you are successful with actually becoming a coder. I blame AAPC, I blame companies not willing to hire entry level coders, and I blame the schools who offer these classes. Everyone is making money off of us, we got scamed by trying to make a better career for ourselves.
There are A LOT of coders with college degrees. Nothing is easy in any field. Did you do research before going to school or did you assume all that was said to you was correct? It is not the job of AAPC nor future employers to give you a job. That is all up to you. Are you testing when you turn in your applications? I know most companies will require you pass their test before granting an interview. All I can tell you is network and take anything you can to get your foot in the door. I realize it is a catch 22. However, this is not a field that just anybody can do either.
 

rthames052006

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There are A LOT of coders with college degrees. Nothing is easy in any field. Did you do research before going to school or did you assume all that was said to you was correct? It is not the job of AAPC nor future employers to give you a job. That is all up to you. Are you testing when you turn in your applications? I know most companies will require you pass their test before granting an interview. All I can tell you is network and take anything you can to get your foot in the door. I realize it is a catch 22. However, this is not a field that just anybody can do either.
Well stated eadun2000. When I get on these forums to network I am taken back by so many who think that AAPC is responsible for the job market and not being able to get a job. Nothing in life is guaranteed, I have 3 kids currently in college or techincal school and I've drilled it into them that it may not be easy getting that first job but not to give up. Can I go and blame the school? No- you need to research the market you want to get in, talk with others already within that field, look in the papers to see what employers are looking for? Are they looking for entry level or must you have so many years or experience? These are all questions that should be asked and found out prior to committing to spending the money? The way I see it no one "twisted your arm" to get into the coding field, you make that choice.

Please lets stop playing the "blame game"!!!
 

GHF

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We hire coders!!!

Rapidly growing Medical Billing & Practice Management Company located in Tempe, Arizona seeks experienced professionals to join the billing, coding, & A/R management team. We ONLY employ certified coders for all charge entry so new applicants will have the opportunity to work right alongside other professional coders and have an opportunity to share/gain valuable knowledge and experience. Department Director is also a CPC! Perfect opportunity for a CPC-A to learn and grow but seasoned coders also have a great opportunity for upward mobility with supervisory, auditing, and management positions as well.

Competitive compensation package offered for desirable candidates. Health, Dental, and Vision plans available for full-time employees in addition to PTO, holiday pay, and fringe benefits.

Full-time Compensation Range: $12-$18/hour + 2 weeks PTO + Benefits

Email Resume to Careers@GoodHealthFinancial.Com
 

ohn0disaster

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just an opinion

Originally Posted by AngelaRank
I became certified in April, past the test first time. I also have a college degree, but I do not have any experience working in the medical field. I am basically over educated and under qualified. I have been job hunting now for 3 months and no one will even give me an interview. I even went to a couple of temp agencies and they also want 2 years experience just to temp. I feel like I have been riped off by what I call "the coding scam." There is advertising everywhere to become a coder, "what a great job", when all they want is your money, they don't care about whether or not you are successful with actually becoming a coder. I blame AAPC, I blame companies not willing to hire entry level coders, and I blame the schools who offer these classes. Everyone is making money off of us, we got scamed by trying to make a better career for ourselves.
Not sure what happened to this post. AAPC moderators didn't like the trash talking, maybe? Should have left it up, whether it be Angela or the AAPC mods that took it down. I'm sure people would have had comments as to how much a bad attitude could deter employers from wanting to hire you. I see these posts all the time and I feel for all the coders finding it hard to find work right now. It's tough right now for anyone to get a job regardless of the profession. Honestly though, think about it this way. If you were in charge of hiring for a company, would you want to hire someone who would so easily give up on something of such importance because they encounter some hardships? I know I would not want to hire someone if I knew that their general outlook was like that of the above poster, Angela. In my opinion, 3 months is not that long and certainly doesn't warrant an AAPC against the coders conspiracy theory. The AAPC isn't here to hand jobs out. The AAPC is here to help you develop the skills needed and get the credentials to prove you have the skills needed to work in the coding/billing field. Where's the perseverance, people????

I agree with the numerous posts that I've seen advising all the new coders to get that foot in the door. I've been told all my life, it's a lot easier to get a job when you have a job than it is to find a job when you really need it. Some of the coders working for the company I work for started out as receptionists and medical records clerks. They made a living while they studied and took their exam. Once they passed, they tried for coding positions. There are doctors' offices and hospitals out there everywhere. There are other ways to get out there and find work but, the most important thing is, don't just give up.
 

bettinadodd

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Patience and optimism come easy when one is employed, but wear thin as debts exceed income. I don't think anyone expects the AAPC to guarantee them a job; however, I do feel the AAPC should share some accountability here. Right now, the market appears to be flooded with certified coders who can't find jobs due to lack of experience. And websites are flooded with advertisements coaxing people to take classes to become certified coders. The U.S. Department of Labor is telling us that the need for certified coders is expanding exponentially (refer to quote from them on my thread 'need for coders?') and that openings are going unfilled. What they are failing to note is that these unfilled positions require 3-5 years of prior experience. We entered this field because we were led to believe from supposedly credible sources that the need for coders was great and increasing, and that the job market was open to new coders with certification. If coding positions are going unfilled, why would any CPC or CPC-A expect to be pounding the pavement just to land a job answering phones and emptying trash? It's not that we feel reception and housekeeping are beneath us, but that we have been misled by sources that should have been trustworthy. And more are joining our ranks every day. Does not the AAPC have some responsibility to inform schools offering coding programs that they should at least advise prospective students who don't already have coding experience that they are likely to end up like so many of us?
 

ohn0disaster

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I understand that as debt accumulates, it's harder to see the end of the rainbow. I'm living that dream. I realize that this is a touchy subject with many and I honestly do not mean to offend anyone. Everyone is different. I just know that I would be out talking to other coders, networking as they say. Going to the chapter meetings in your local area can help. Honestly, I don't even go to the meetings in my local area but I know that I constantly get emails about open positions. Some positions require 2 years experience, some prefer 2 years experience. Sometimes they just make you take a test. What I meant by suggesting starting out as a receptionist or any other position in a medical setting is that, once you build a work relationship and have those that will put in a good word for you, it can only get easier to find something. Once you're working in a medical setting, you get to hear about open positions within or outside of your company that you wouldn't have normally gotten the memo about, so to speak.

I'm not saying that everyone that is having problems finding work just aren't trying hard enough. That is DEFINITELY not the case. I just believe that, although it is easier to just give up, there is something within us that can make us refuse to buckle. If we can find it in ourselves to keep going when times seem tough, the rewards tend to outweigh the tribulations we had to go through.

My boyfriend always has called me an optimist!
 
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marley510

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Difficult finding work

I am so glad I logged on to this forum. I thought I was the only one having trouble finding work for even billing. I took a year long course for medical billing and coding and graduated with high marks. Also took the CPC exam and bummer have to retake it. Not an easy exam!!! Employers do want more yrs experience. I was told by my school I could use and count my one yr of schooling as experience. Big help that is.
I'm currently signing up for volunteer work at my local hospital as well to get a foot in the door but gain some experience. Not exactly coding but its a start.
Misery loves company but I hope we all find work in our field soon.
 

rthames052006

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Patience and optimism come easy when one is employed, but wear thin as debts exceed income. I don't think anyone expects the AAPC to guarantee them a job; however, I do feel the AAPC should share some accountability here. Right now, the market appears to be flooded with certified coders who can't find jobs due to lack of experience. And websites are flooded with advertisements coaxing people to take classes to become certified coders. The U.S. Department of Labor is telling us that the need for certified coders is expanding exponentially (refer to quote from them on my thread 'need for coders?') and that openings are going unfilled. What they are failing to note is that these unfilled positions require 3-5 years of prior experience. We entered this field because we were led to believe from supposedly credible sources that the need for coders was great and increasing, and that the job market was open to new coders with certification. If coding positions are going unfilled, why would any CPC or CPC-A expect to be pounding the pavement just to land a job answering phones and emptying trash? It's not that we feel reception and housekeeping are beneath us, but that we have been misled by sources that should have been trustworthy. And more are joining our ranks every day. Does not the AAPC have some responsibility to inform schools offering coding programs that they should at least advise prospective students who don't already have coding experience that they are likely to end up like so many of us?
AAPC cannot be responsible for what a " school" tells it's prospective students. I can vouch that I worked for a college teaching non credit classes in ICD-9 and on the first night of class a student questioned me or should I say badgered me about what kind of salary she could earn and how she wanted to take the CPC exam after taking a basic med term, icd-9 and cpt class? I was upfront and honest with her and told her the truth, she was going to report me to the dean because I ruined her "vision" of what it would be like in the real world. You must remember these colleges, tech schools are there to get you to spend your money in their school, no one and I mean no one can guarantee you a job as a CPC. Maybe before signing on the dotted line you should querry recent graduates to find out their experiences since finishing school, I also think the school can provide you with that info as they do track placement for their students... Like another poster said the AAPC and other schools can provide you with the education you will need but cannot guarantee you a job. Our field is not the only field with this issue/problem/concern....

I was a medical biller up until this past July, I've been in the medical field for over 18 years and been certified since 2005 and I can honestly say that this position I have now is my first "real" coding job... I was able to utilize some of my coding skills while being a medical biller but to really use my coding skills and credentials on a daily regular basis without having to do the "billing" just happened for me. Although I wish it would have happened alot faster I'm glad it finally has, and I'm also thankful for the all the things I've learned along the way because of being a "biller" at heart for the past 18 years....

It doesn't happen overnight... some people catch a lucky break, or know someone within...
 

kimscoding

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I am RHIT and CPC licensed with medical billing, coding and auditing experience since 1995 and I can't even get a job. As it has been stated in previous posts, it is not AAPC or AHIMA's job to get us a job. That is for us to do, to learn how to market ourselves and have confidence in the credentials that we have to prove that we are as good as we think we are. Good Luck!
 

01161870

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Try to find work doing AR follow up, charge entry, receipt posting, medical records..... with a practice or billing company...then work from there learning that practice specialty or that billing company's clients.
Then when you see job openings for coders where you currently work, you'd might be more than likely be 1st pick since you are already employed there.
It might sound like the backwards way to do it, but that's what I did. I still work in AR follow up a little (which I love) but now I get to code for providers. I make sure things are in order before the claim goes out the door & have to work denials on the back end....when the info was right there in the record to begin with.
Hang in there!
Great advice! I think it is a help. Maybe taking a slight step back before going forward is key. Here in the Tampa Bay area jobs in coding are slim but billing seems to have a bit more (not by much) since I see them listed more in the online job postings. I am currently a coding student & work in an office as a biller. I have hope that it will allow me to get into a coding position down the road a bit when I am done with school. I sure hope my thoughts are correct. Billing is fine & all but I sure would like to expand my career :D I have always be lucky to have a door open for me... I use to be a medical assistant which then lead me to a referral coordinator then that lead me to a billing position & now I hope this will open a door to coding. So my advice is just keep pushing along, the more under your belt the more employers see you as a benefit to their company / practice. I agree HANG IN THERE :)
 

rthames052006

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think positive...

I am RHIT and CPC licensed with medical billing, coding and auditing experience since 1995 and I can't even get a job. As it has been stated in previous posts, it is not AAPC or AHIMA's job to get us a job. That is for us to do, to learn how to market ourselves and have confidence in the credentials that we have to prove that we are as good as we think we are. Good Luck!
I"m glad your one of the ones who feel this way! It's refreshing to see that some of us don't blame AAPC for the bad economy we are experiencing... I wish you all the luck in finding that position!
 

bettinadodd

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I just call 'em as I see 'em! By the way, there are hundreds of jobs listed with MAXIM HIS (Health Information Services ?) for coders, depending on locale. If you're in Texas, New York, Connecticutt, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Illinois, Colorado, California, Washington, Arizona, Florida, West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, Loiusiana, or just about anywhere but Virginia, like me, it might be worth checking out.
 

taberli

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I feel bad for the people who fell for the advertisements from deceptive "schools" that tell people that they can earn 50 grand a year working from home and all you have to do is pay them 20 grand and pass a little test. Nothing is ever that easy. My best advise to anyone who does enjoy coding but does not have the experiance to get a job is to work your way into a practice, clinic or hospital and then start trying to manuevre into a coding position. Most work from home companies will not hire anyone without a minimum of 3 years multi specialty experiance. I have worked for Maxim for over 5 1/2 years and believe me you need the experiance to be able to work from home. I do have a fantastic manager but I also have to figure a lot out on my own. Inexperienced coders would never make it in the remote world. There is just toooooooo much to know.
Network with your local chapter and that may help you too. Best of luck.
 

kevbshields

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The responsibilities lay with both instructors and students to discuss job market strategies. Generally, this requires that the students do their own research, find reliable sources and having instructors who are, themselves, certified coders with recent "real world" experience.

Given that most coding programs last between one and two years, finding time to initiate this discussion can be difficult. If this thread and the countless others on this forum aren't evidence enough, it is part of mentoring to provide guidance in the job search. This does not mean that instructors should need to find employment for students, but frame the conversation about the reality of the current job market, the history and what experts say about the future.

As a former (and hopefully future) instructor, my students knew that the first lecture of any class was to understand the job market a little better, grasp the credentials, gain working knowledge of how to become certified and what entry level jobs were available and of benefit to them in pursuit to be billers, coders, managers, instructors and so on.
 

preserene

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Going into this thread is so distressing, though it is the realty.. No one is accountable for the ‘out of reach situation’ for the new-bee. Yes indeed it is very hard these days to gain an entry. The way the employers ask for an experience is so distressing when it comes to a certified coder waiting for 1year and X exponentials. Many of them already have been in an ‘atmosphere’ and a sort of hands- on-experience for a year or two. It is not that they are not talented, equipped or stuffed; there is something beyond that we cannot comprehend!!
Some could argue that it is as simple as that these coders have no experience well, it is a known truth but give them a walker for a little while; most of them will start running on their first Birthday!!
Even I changed my career with the great passion in coding, after many years of high volume fast track and highly responsible and accountable job. It is not that sort of “all that glitters are not gold.” Coding is a great fascinating and rewarding career not only in monitory perspective, but provides a great sense of satisfaction social net work, and joy of completing challenging issues. It is a totally committed, responsible and noble job, rendered towards a noble profession and laurels, who have committed themselves, and sacrificed many perks of their social and family life style.
No regret and no turning back. Great days pretty near - just a few blocks ahead of you all who wait for that moment.
Every positive advice provided to you in this forum, is a precious pearl and a stepping stone for your success.
I had been waiting for a year to find one.; many phone and personal interviews. Every time I was almost at the verge of shooting but it just passed for some reason that I could not comprehend. I was not lacking behind in many ways to my knowledge. I kept striking hard every day, whole day and all day long and late nights.
AAPC is doing a tremendous work in posting many thousands of job offer every day. I sit late nights to go into the details of the requirements the employers need- at inter and intra states levels!. It is a huge investment on the part of AAPC to do such a wonderful job for us. I kept applying untiringly (though depressed sometimes). ROME WAS NOT BUILT IN A DAY!
There are some HRs (employers), who really do not look into the potentials and values inside of you; some of them are strictly so steam lined, stereotyped and programmed that they set you aside so quickly as a winkle of an eye! I do not blame them for that; that is the way it happens to be; even for those who are willing to enter into the reception.
But there are many who really get into the insight of the valuable equations of the position and your potentialities, and set up interviews for you; often it is hard for them to select one among the best and one fine day, the fortune smiles on YOU!
Finally, the bottom line of my story is, after my tireless and relentless persuasiveness and perseverance, more than that, my never failing God, our Good Lord, got me into the dream job which I had been luring since long.
You know what? I got the ad from AAPC Job site. I thank AAPC for that. Thank God, but for His amazing Grace, I would not have got there. Next, my long term search did not fail me.
Search is not lucrative but decorative in its outcome.
So do not give up. Try ceaselessly until you win the race!
Thank you for tuning in!!!
 
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pluto315

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Thank you all for your advise, it is great that you all took time out to help and I hope that all of your responses helped others as well. I love coding and I would hate to have to give up so I have taken it a couple steps foward. Last December I finished with medical transcription but couldn't find a job in that field unless I have 3 years experience just like coding. This week I started a Medical Assistant degree at the college that I received my coding degree from, I only have 9 class then I will finish with an medical assisting degree. By November of this year I will have a degree in Coding, Medical assisting and a certificate in transcription. This will be my last try to be a part of the medical community, I have been in and out of medical school for aprox. 15 years. I am trying so hard because it isn't just me, I have a 4 year old little girl, a husband, and a dog (I just had to include her, she counts too) My family depends on me and I want to show my little girl that I tried so hard for her.

Stacy Keown, CPC
 

pdciaralli

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Coding Positions

Where do you live I'm looking for two ER coders, must know evaluation and management, ICD-9, CPT and able to code 80 to 100 charts per day.
Paula Ciaralli
619-532-9939 San Diego
 
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I have never replied to a post before, but after reading your response to this thread I was prompted to do so.
I am another one of those recent graduates of a medical coding specialist program. Sold on the possibility that jobs in this field were in high demand. The job search has been very disappointing. The key word is "Experience" when applying for coding/billing job positions. Without 3-5 yrs experience in the field, applicants are not even considered. It is very easy to see why newly credentialed candidates are giving up or reconsidering their career choice.
Giving up is not an option, or even a word in my vocabulary. Having frustration and feeling discouraged are two factors that are setting in and may be hendering my outlook. I attended a vocational college to obtain my education and graduated with a 4.0 GPA, I also took the AAPC CPC exam and earned my CPC-A credentials, I was ready then to put all of that to good use and I still am ready to do so...but my lack of experience keeps me from being able.
A support system offered to recent graduates might be helpful, not just to recommend jobs, or to offer continued education, but a system that could place an apprentise with a mentor. After completing my externship and graduating, I felt like I was shipped out to sea without a life jacket. If there was a program for mentoring I would sign up and I think alot of others would too. Clasting blame or questioning responsibility will not produce positive results.
 
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bkvanausdal

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Tough it is

It is definitely a tough market, as is any other market. I'm young, just recently finished a medical coding program and how I got into the field was by taking a job at a call-center. I worked hard, happy that I simply had a job and in six months was blessed to be moved into the auditing department. You never know what may come your way but a foot in the door is effective, coming from first-hand experience. Good luck to all!
 

pluto315

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Hey there smith in memphis, tn. I completely agree with your statement. I am so glad I started this thread I feel that all of us have helped others. I have gotten ideas from other coders in this thread, I plan on calling our tiny hospital in Campbellsville to see if they can accept me as a volunteer. Although, I need money to help my family survive, I am willing to accept a volunteer status to get my foot in the door.I love coding and I feel that I was good, detailed coder, but now I am having to go back to school for another medical degree;medical assistanting.
 

dquon1

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Hi, newly certified CPC-A here!

After reading through the whole thread, what seems to be the most helpful for me is reading how people got the billing and coding jobs and strategies they used. Is this the right thread for that or is this a more general thread? The more specific, the better! Or even what would you not do/do?

Thanks!
 

latonna1

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Hello Mrs Paula, I live in Greensburg, Ky. Thank you for the reply.
Stacy Keown, CPC
pluto315@yahoo.com
Does the coder need to be certified? I live in Arizona and schedule to take my CPC on 6/25/10. I am very much willing to re-locate if the right offer comes available. I have 12yrs experience as a CNA, 2 yrs as a Referral Coordinator for one of the biggest injured/urgent care clinics, Concentra. I currently graduated from a technical college and got hired right out of my externship at an outsource billing company.
 
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Has anyone investigated the "Virtual Experience" offered by the AAPC.

I believe this may be their response to so many CPC-As looking for experience.

It seems like it has good potential, however, the question remaining is this:

Do you pay the money, code the 800 charts, and have your "A" dropped but still have no experience to put on a resume to gain employment with?

Or are employers looking at this ans saying "800 charts coded at a 90% sounds like they know what they are doing at this point, I will give them an opportunity to work for me".
 

Kvphoto

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I am in the process of finishing a billing and coding college certificate program. It includes a billing internship and a coding internship. I work slightly shorter hours than most so am hoping to gain some experience by looking for a non paying internship in coding or billing. Does anyone know what the consensus may be on that?
 
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We hire coders!!!

Rapidly growing Medical Billing & Practice Management Company located in Tempe, Arizona seeks experienced professionals to join the billing, coding, & A/R management team. We ONLY employ certified coders for all charge entry so new applicants will have the opportunity to work right alongside other professional coders and have an opportunity to share/gain valuable knowledge and experience. Department Director is also a CPC! Perfect opportunity for a CPC-A to learn and grow but seasoned coders also have a great opportunity for upward mobility with supervisory, auditing, and management positions as well.

Competitive compensation package offered for desirable candidates. Health, Dental, and Vision plans available for full-time employees in addition to PTO, holiday pay, and fringe benefits.

Full-time Compensation Range: $12-$18/hour + 2 weeks PTO + Benefits

Email Resume to Careers@GoodHealthFinancial.Com


Hi GHF,

This sounds like an awesome opportunity and would love to take the opportunity; however, I'm in LA. I became certified last year in November and have not found a thing. All employers require experience but how do we gain the experience if no one is willing to give us the opportunity. Would you happen to know another billing company out in my area that is offering the same opportunity? Please advise at your earliest convenience.

Thanks!
 

blondie525

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I started working for a billing company in the data entry department. I took an anatomy and a coding/billing class and then was able to move into the coding department. About half of the people in coding came from other departments. I am glad that I started where I did and transferred because there are things that I knew from data entry that were helpful in coding. I know I am fortunate to have done it that way and I am grateful that it has worked out.

I know a couple of people that are taking coding/billing classes and I try to be encouraging but realistic. I tell them that there are many opportunities but that they might not be doing what they want right away. It does seem that some schools make it look like there are tons of jobs but honestly they're just trying to get your money.
 

Jad2018

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9 Years Ago

This is from 2010!!!
Really feel like there should NOT be any type of advertising for this profession as far as education, certification and job opportunity. Nine years of continued new grads not finding jobs is a huge problem. Nursing goes through cycles of hiring slow down and even freezes but never gets this bad. Nine years ???????
Realistically speaking, this is beyond the usual job saturation catch up game all job fields go through. Everyone should be aware of this issue. It’s almost dishonest not to make it available to potential students looking into coding programs.
 

Pathos

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You know, with these posts I have to remind myself of what is real and what is being posted. I truly feel for those who have been out the money for Coding school/online courses, and as a freshly minted CPC-A are trying to get experience, but are unable to get any for XYZ reasons. I've experienced first-hand the struggle to land a decent/good job, and being rejected time over time again for ABC reasons. It really sucks!

However, with everything said (and you will find several of similar posts in Employment General Discussion), I think we are not seeing the full picture here. The people who are posting about not getting a Coding job because they are getting rejected due to lack of coding experience, but cannot get experience because they can't get a coding job (the job experience paradox) is really not exclusive to Coding. I've been trying to get into management for years, but rejected because I don't have enough management experience. Instead I chose to go into a more senior coding position, and in return probably making as much or exceeding the salary of a supervisor/manager.

There are coding jobs out there. Truly, and this is not a magic, pretend fairy tale I am spinning you. If you cannot get hired because of the paradox explained above, then move onto the next company. Keep going until you find someone who are willing to hire those freshly minted CPC-As (and yes there are companies who prefer newbie coders compared to experienced ones), and nail your resumes/interviews with those companies. This might require a move or some commuting (I recently moved for my new job), but you also have to ask yourself how important getting that first coding job is.

If your goal is remote coding, you won't realistically be able to work from home until you have at least 3-5 years of coding (some companies require more experience than that even), but definitely not as a CPC-A. You would be doing yourself a disfavor even if you attempted, because Coding is a life-long learning process. Even those coders who have been coding for 20+ years still tell me they learn every day.

Unfortunately, we don't see many success posts of coders who were able to land jobs despite the gloomy picture being drawn here. Too often I see complaining in these threads about how unfair the industry is, and how instructors should prepare students that you might not get a job once you graduate. Perhaps the curriculum should include something more realistic, however I refuse to believe that getting hired is as disparaging as some people like to portray.

Even if the doom and gloom scenario is true, then what are you personally doing about it? Are you just going to give up and throw all that time, effort and money away? If you took a coding course, then you're probably out a couple thousand dollars or so. Engage AAPC, AHIMA, and local instructors to do something about the problem you are describing. Perhaps find a billing job that deals somewhat with CPT/ICD-10 codes and tell your hiring manager that your goal is actual Coding. If that manager is worth her/his salt, then they will likely guide you into that direction (and if you show enough Grit and Promise).

Final note: You did also revive a really old thread, while saying nothing about your own efforts or troubles. Your post resembles just another trollish move and whipping up another negative atmosphere. Cordial discussion is welcomed, but please bring something more substantial to the table first.

EDIT: And by the way, we just had someone post a job for any coders (Coding I position), so as I was saying the jobs are out there if you are willing to make the effort to get them. Exert from the job post: "Must hold either AAPC Certified Professional Coder (CPC or CPC-A) or AHIMA Certified Coding Specialist-Physician-based (CCS-P) certifications.".
 
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twtcpc

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I have to agree with Pathos...why and what purpose does it serve to revive such an old thread without any new/useful information?

I actually hold both sides at fault in this...the student for not doing more research beyond the promises that some of these coding schools make in their advertisement of get rich quick coding from home and the schools for recruiting students in this manner. Not to say that this is true in all instances, but I have seen my share of this going on.

Back when I first decided to change careers and to go into the medical field from education, rather than rush to a tech school, I researched and got a job with in customer service with a home health and DME company and then transitioned to hospital/clinic jobs. Once I began to learn more about the field and opportunities, I then began researching how to go about getting additional training in coding and used my position at that time to find a reputable coding program and transfer into coding. Once I proved myself as being invested enough to learn my employer agreed to send me to classes and with my good grades and passing my CPC, they agree to expand my duties to include coding. I have now been in healthcare/coding for 18 years and I still have trouble landing my dream job/pay!! Pathos you're not alone :) It wasn't until 17 years later that I finally am able to work from home and the only reason is that I worked hard to get a positive reputation with the physicians/management of the company that I work for and when my husband and I moved almost a year ago, they were willing to work with me to make working remotely possible to keep my as an employee.

The reason that I share my story is so that others might take heed and take the time/effort to work your way up and learn. I do not wish ill or negative on those searching, but please remember that sometimes it takes starting somewhere you didn't necessarily want to in the field. And by the way, sometimes it is HR directly the instruction regarding experience and not necessarily that of the manager themselves. We currently outsource our coding and one of the coders that I frequently interact with has been in the field for almost a year now and I have to give her credit for asking great questions and even keeping me on my toes sometimes!
 
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Get in where you can

I will say the best advice I can give is to apply to any position at your local hospital to get your foot in the door. Most hospitals only require you to work in a department 6 months and then you are eligible to transfer. I got my foot in the door as an office assistant and then applied for an open coding position as soon as I could transfer. Hospitals almost always post jobs internally first with internal candidates having a far greater chance than an outside candidates at getting the job. The hospital coding department I work for has hired mostly internal candidates because it's easier and a lot less training time that you require. There are quite a few CPCs that are going the same route and just getting their foot in the door, so the coding jobs are getting snatched up very quickly. It would take an outside coder a month or longer to go through orientation and training where if someone applies internally they report to the department after their 2 week notice. I know it's not ideal, but it's definitely something to think about.
 

kcoymarin

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Not sure what happened to this post. AAPC moderators didn't like the trash talking, maybe? Should have left it up, whether it be Angela or the AAPC mods that took it down. I'm sure people would have had comments as to how much a bad attitude could deter employers from wanting to hire you. I see these posts all the time and I feel for all the coders finding it hard to find work right now. It's tough right now for anyone to get a job regardless of the profession. Honestly though, think about it this way. If you were in charge of hiring for a company, would you want to hire someone who would so easily give up on something of such importance because they encounter some hardships? I know I would not want to hire someone if I knew that their general outlook was like that of the above poster, Angela. In my opinion, 3 months is not that long and certainly doesn't warrant an AAPC against the coders conspiracy theory. The AAPC isn't here to hand jobs out. The AAPC is here to help you develop the skills needed and get the credentials to prove you have the skills needed to work in the coding/billing field. Where's the perseverance, people????

I agree with the numerous posts that I've seen advising all the new coders to get that foot in the door. I've been told all my life, it's a lot easier to get a job when you have a job than it is to find a job when you really need it. Some of the coders working for the company I work for started out as receptionists and medical records clerks. They made a living while they studied and took their exam. Once they passed, they tried for coding positions. There are doctors' offices and hospitals out there everywhere. There are other ways to get out there and find work but, the most important thing is, don't just give up.
You are so right. It took me 6 months to get a job and it was the ONLY call I got for an interview after I finished my medical billing and coding course at Allen School. I was employed as a billing and insurance specialist and then became the billing manager. I was with the practice for 7+ years (2010-2018). It was only after being told that my job was being sourced "out" and I was given 4 months to find another job that I began to post my resume on different job websites. I got an interview scheduled within hours of posting to an agency that interviews prospective workers for health care providers and I was hired. The bottom line is to get our foot in the door. We need to be focused on our goal and move purposefully toward it. We may never know what networking can happen at that foot-in-the-door place of employment or what promotion awaits.
 

Mayzoo

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We also need to do the things that make us more marketable. I did many things to increase my marketability:

1. I became HIPAA certified (I think it was 15-20 dollars at the time).

2. I took practicode to increase my experience and remove my apprentice status.

3 I took a certification course in Anatomy and Physiology (free).

4. I took a CPT blitz course through CCO to both increase my chances of passing the CPC exam and to show additional education on my resume.


I did what I needed to do to show dedication to this profession and to show I was educated and motivated. I was hired 3 weeks after I had my apprentice status removed and began looking for a job.
 
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