Rejection coding productivity

BklynGirl

New
Local Chapter Officer
Messages
7
Location
Cliffside Park New Jersey
Best answers
0
I work in a department that only handles rejections for several specialties (Urology, Neurology, ENT, and Dermatology. Soon to be added: Orthopedics, Pediatrics, Ophthalmology). My coworkers and I work all departments equally. There is much dispute between the coders and management about acceptable productivity levels. Does anyone exclusively work the rejections? I've searched and can't find any productivity numbers for rejection coding.
 
Messages
811
Best answers
0
At the facility I work in, I oversee staff who work rejections (and denials). We developed a policy for determining productivity based on an average number worked. We pulled historical data showing how many rejections and denials had been worked by all the staff and determined the average number per week. That set our test-baseline at XX per week. We rolled out the productivity level of XX rejections/denials that would be expected to be worked during one work week. We re-evaluated after a month and decided we were asking too much, so we lowered the number expected to XY. Everyone gets easy and difficult ones equally for the most part, so it was determined the productivity XY level was appropriate for all staff members. Of course, you'd have to have the ability to track the number worked down to each staff member.

I wrote the policy for this and it was approved by everyone up the food chain. If someone isn't meeting the expected productivity number, we offer re-training. If they still fail to meet the XY, we put them into a "probation" type status, allowing for additional training and 6 months to improve or the possibility of termination would come into play. Out of 200 staff members, I've only ever had to terminate ONE for failing to get up to par in the course of 5 years.

Not sure if this helps, but maybe you can take some ideas and see where you can go with them.
 
Top