rbassett

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We have a clinic with 2 offices in 2 different states (both right along the border so still fairly close to each other). One of them has a Humphrey's and the other one doesn't yet. One of my doctors frequently sends paitients to the office with the visual field machine for just the test and then the patient is seen at a later date with my doctor and the test is interpreted at that time. In these cases should I be using the TC modifier for when the test is performed and then the 26 when the patient is seen and the test is interpreted? Or should it all be bill as one without the mods since both offices are owned by the same company?
Please share your thoughts and insights!
 

Cheezum51

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Since the two offices are both part of the same practice, I would just bill the 92083 without modifiers.

Tom Cheezum, O.D., CPC
 

rbassett

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Coeur d'Alene, ID
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Since the two offices are both part of the same practice, I would just bill the 92083 without modifiers.

Tom Cheezum, O.D., CPC

You think that's okay to do? I won't get in trouble for not splitting them up?
And another similar scenario: What if one doctor orders the test and then a different one from the other location does the interp? Sorry for all of the questions, I just want to make sure we are doing it correctly since the POS locations are different :)
 

Cheezum51

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I assume that the billing is done under the same TIN for either office since they're both part of the same practice. If that's the case, then you should be able to bill the 92083 without modifiers.

In the second scenario, why would a another doctor, other than that ordering the test, do the interpretation and report? If that happens, you may have to bill the test and I&R under the NPI of the doctor who did the I&R without any modifiers. That's a tough one and I'd probably try to avoid that especially if your doctors are paid on production because the ordering doctor wouldn't get credit for the fees generated by the test.

Tom Cheezum, O.D., CPC
 
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