Coder Productivity

kunzecpc

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Greetings!

I'm doing some research for my job about coder productivity standards. I haven't found any specifics on the internet, so I'm guessing each employer sets their own standards for productivity. I'm asking you as my peers to give a little feedback.

My questions are: Will you please respond with the productvity standard (number of encounters that you are required to code - either by the hour, or 8 hour workday) for your clinic or facility? Also, what percentage of coding accuracy are you required to maintain?

Thanks in advance!
 

kunzecpc

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Thanks for the responses so far. I have one more question for dabroussard - if you don't mind my asking - what specialty(ies) do you code for?
Thanks again!
 

dawndi67

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I work physicians side of the ER we are expected to code 100 charts at the least in a 7 1/2 hr day..... This is for a new coder then productivity goes up as experience grows. I hope this helps with your research.... good luck:)
 

rthames052006

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Wow Melissa,

That sounds like alot of coding in a day, it couldn't be easy.

Do you still code radiology.

I may have an opportunity to do radiology coding/billing in the near future, I will have to ask about coder productivitiy.

Roxanne Thames, CPC




When I was coding radiology we had to code at least 400 reports a day with a 95% accuracy.
 

lhamilton

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orthopaedic coding

Does anyone have any productivity standards for e/m and surgical coding in the ortho office? Thanks in advance! lauren
 

charonate

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When I used to code radiology it was required to code 400 notes in a 8 hr/day with a 95% accuracy.

Now I'm working for urology/auditor its required to code 150 notes in a 8hr/day with 90% accuracy.
 

mmelcam

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Roxanne,

I no longer code radiology, I code general surgery. 400/8 hr. day was not that hard to meet. I am sure you will do fine with radiology coding/billing.
 

dabroussard

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I am the Site Manager and have 7 certified coders and 2 certified auditors. We code for 125 physicians. The specialties run from Family Practice, Pediatrics, General Surgery, Cardiology, OB, Gyn, Internal Medicine, Urology, Plastic Surgery, Neurology, Nephrology, Mental health. Gastroenterology, Orthopedics, Podiatry, Chiropractics, PT, OT,Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric Endocrinology, Rheumatology and Oncology
 

jifnif

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I code in radiology and have for the past 10+ years. My range is between 200 and 400 studies per day. But in addition to coding I also have transcription, billing, billing inquiries, receptionist and administrative assistant to 12 doctors. My day is pretty busy. I am lucky to get 250 in on a day when I am typing or making up the schedules. :)
 

rthames052006

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I code in radiology and have for the past 10+ years. My range is between 200 and 400 studies per day. But in addition to coding I also have transcription, billing, billing inquiries, receptionist and administrative assistant to 12 doctors. My day is pretty busy. I am lucky to get 250 in on a day when I am typing or making up the schedules. :)


Sounds to me like a pretty busy day too...

I think it's nice to get other duties besides coding too, you get a variety... so to speak, although I would like to be doing more coding I don't think I could sit and do just coding all day. I guess it's because of where I am coming from to.

Have a good week,
 
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I don't understand how this is possible... It takes me all day to code anywhere between 50-75 surgeries from begining to end. Could it be because the length of the reports, or the speciality? I am coding Orthopedic Surgeries, and the reports are most often close to 2 full pages. Should I be worried that I am not up to speed? :confused:
 

rthames052006

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I don't understand how this is possible... It takes me all day to code anywhere between 50-75 surgeries from begining to end. Could it be because the length of the reports, or the speciality? I am coding Orthopedic Surgeries, and the reports are most often close to 2 full pages. Should I be worried that I am not up to speed? :confused:
Don't understand how what is possible...
 

Lassal423

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I'd like to clarify the numbers that have been mentioned in this thread. When the coding is strictly operative reports, what are the expected production amounts?
I think this is a GREAT use of this community! This is a way we can use real-life examples of what other coders are doing with the same type of work.

Thanks in advance!
 

TWinsor

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Our procedure coders are required 6/hour and our E/M coders are required 20 per hour.

Question for dabroussard. Do you code surgical cases from the op note or E/M visits.
 

TWinsor

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I don't understand how this is possible... It takes me all day to code anywhere between 50-75 surgeries from begining to end. Could it be because the length of the reports, or the speciality? I am coding Orthopedic Surgeries, and the reports are most often close to 2 full pages. Should I be worried that I am not up to speed? :confused:
I agree with you. I only average the same as you and I have been coding general surgery for 15 years.
 

medcode

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These are my production standards for the facility I code at. 15 minutes for inpatient chart, 6 mintues for short stay, ambulatory surgery, 2 mintues per er encounter, 1 mintue per lab or xray encouter.

Greetings!

I'm doing some research for my job about coder productivity standards. I haven't found any specifics on the internet, so I'm guessing each employer sets their own standards for productivity. I'm asking you as my peers to give a little feedback.

My questions are: Will you please respond with the productvity standard (number of encounters that you are required to code - either by the hour, or 8 hour workday) for your clinic or facility? Also, what percentage of coding accuracy are you required to maintain?

Thanks in advance!
 

jdemar

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I agree with TWinsor & pdelorenzo, I code for Orthopaedic Surgeons I have 14 different surgeons and anatomical specialties along with trauma cases and I work a 10 hour day. I usually code and post on average 100 cases, it really does depend on how detailed the surgery is.....the cases most often have 2- 5 pages of dictation to read. Hope this helps and relieves some worries of others.:)
 

MLARSON61

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I perform Second Level Review for a bill review company . For E/M bills the average production rate is 12-20 per hour depending on the length of report and the specialty, it averages out to 3-5 minutes per bill. For procedures with modifier 59 codes it can range 1 -3 minutes. This includes documenting the rationale for the coding analysis result.

I review surgery and radiolology bills as well and he timing is different. It all depends on the specialty and how detailed the coder is.
I hope this helps.
 

dmarchand

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Greetings

I just recently started at a local hospital, ER coding. I was told 94 - 125 per day. I thought that was overwhelming, since I just started in the field and still learning the 3M software. They code almost everything the doc. writes on the sheet, including hx of anxiety or depression, even if the patient came in for a broken leg. They said they want to cover medical necessity. I didn't think that would apply in ER coding. Any insight on this ? :confused:
Thanks,
Deb M, CPC
 

S Avara CPC

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Hope this helps......

I found a survey on AHIMA's webiste once, I can't locate it now but it stated that outpatient coders should be able to code 160 charts per hour. My coders also have to balance and bill so I set their productivity at 120 per hour and they are expected to have at least a 90% accuracy rate.
 
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When I coded ER, I was required to code between 24-26 charts per 8 hour day (24 for EMR, 26 for paper charts). We had to code at a 5% error ratio or under per month.
 

jojo2922

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I work for a large Medical Center with 2 hospitals and several outpatient clinics. We have standards set for all the different types of coding done. For Outpatient coding we have to code 20 per hour, this covers radiology, labs, ambulance and various other outpatient procedures done. For surgery coding it is 8 per hour, Observation is 5 per hour, inpatient is 28 per day and ER coding is 75 per day. We are required to have 95% accuracy. Hope this helps. We also all have our own queue to look at daily for claims that have been denied and need to be looked at again and this is also part of our productivity.
 
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jojo2922

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I don't understand how this is possible... It takes me all day to code anywhere between 50-75 surgeries from begining to end. Could it be because the length of the reports, or the speciality? I am coding Orthopedic Surgeries, and the reports are most often close to 2 full pages. Should I be worried that I am not up to speed? :confused:
The hospital I work for requires 8 per hour for surgeries and this is for all specialties. From what I've found and heard, this is about the norm.
 

okiesawyers

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Productivity

At my previous job, the minimum requirement for a coder was 17 an hour per 8 hour day. The requirements were a little different for auditors. My new job requirement is auditing 90 records per 8 hour day. Accuracy standard is a miminum of 95% and is VERY strict.

ALS
 
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carolyn E

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production standards

I was wondering if you are keying what you code or do you have a data entry person that does the keying? thanks
 

DNABORS

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[ i code for radiologist, i do about 800 to a 1000 reports in 8 hrs. 95% accuracy is required, we code from our computers not paper. i love it
 
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I used to code radiology. 400 is not such a busy day due to the repetitive nature of the codes. I loved getting 71010. :D
 

alexander

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I have a question regarding the coding productivity. As far as the response from the EM coders, are you actually reading the chart, abstracting the information and determining the level or are you entering the EM codes the doctors select? I do EM coding (outpatient new and established, office consults, ER) and it really surprises me that a coder in a 7- 7 1/2 hour day coding that many EM's with 95% accuracy. Just curious to know. Same with some of the other cases that some of the coders speak of, are they actually reading the charts, abstracting the information, derterming the ICD-9 code and CPT codes themselves, or inputing codes that a provider selected. I am not trying to insult anyone, but I am really curious.
Thanks to anyone who can give me some insight to their coding day and their Productivity
Thanks:)
 
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liny

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Does anyone have any productivity standards for e/m and surgical coding in the ortho office? Thanks in advance! lauren
I code for ER Physcians for 10 differents states at least, my quota is 275 a day
 

Lassal423

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Patients or Codes?

Again - I for one REALLY appreciate all of the helpful information on productivity on this thread!

A question for all of you that have responded with your numbers --are you counting patients or codes? Example: You have 1 patient that had 5 encounters in the hospital (consult, subsequent hosp visits, etc.) - do you count it as 1 patient or 5 line items?

Thanks!
 
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I am so glad to hear this includes all kinds of specialities, surgeries, E&M's, radiology and so forth. I was really begining to worry about my productivity. :eek:
I am a very detailed coder, (I think 99% of us are - you have to be to work in this field, right??!!) and sometimes it can back me up a bit.
I am relieved to hear everyones input though! I forget (being consumed in my own work) how many aspects, and specialties there are for coders!!
Thank you all for sharing!! :cool:

I wonder if the AAPC would be willing to handle such a survey?
 
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coder16

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When I worked with a hospital, coding radiology, I was expected to code 60 reports per hour - accuracy was not an issue with them - just get those charges in!!!

Now where I work - productivity is not an issue - do what you can, but I still keep track and I average between 58-60 per hour still.

Take care
 

smeeks31

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Productivity

I work in a research hospital and I code outpatient accts and we have it set up that you code 15 EHR an hour with 97%. And I have been doing this for 6months out of school for 1 year. So far I have reach from March of 08' 12 EHR an hour. I think I have accomplished alot in the 6months of training as you say in coding now. I can look at the charges and know exactly what I to code. We have been heavenly into the quality and not trying to drown the UB04 with millions of codes on them.
 

jennybr36

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coding productivity

did e.r. coding for 3 years. productivity level is 28-29 in an hour, with a 95%accuracy level. hope this helps:) :)
 

tarlington

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Productivity

Hello Everyone,
I love this forum! I code Emergency room and Trauma charts from online but
after coding online I have to complete an encounter form -writing out the
Diagnosis codes-Procedure-E/M level then circle this information on another
part of the form-write patient account number-name-dos-physician name-
peds-adult-fast track-my initials and date coded. And my director wants
us to code 200 charts a day! It is impossible! Of course our accuracy must be 95%. This is along with sending our physicians feedback on the send back charts that need to be completed. Does this sound impossible to anyone else? If we were just online--I could see 200.
thanks!:eek:
 
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When working as a coder/auditor in the outpt setting we required 150 encounters a day with a 95% accuracy. It was not difficult to meet those standards. As an auditor for inpt I'm required to audit 8 records an hour with a 99% accuracy.

Kelley Hettig, CPC, CCP, CCP-AS
 

megan518

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radiology coding

I code for radiology too, and we are required to code 500, in a 7 & 1/2 hour work day, for new coders. And then it increases over time, with more experience to 1000. And errors have to be less than 3% when auditing.
 

Wahini50

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Samau

Expectation is approx 600 CPT's day depending on if you are coding an imaging center or hospital site, and we get audited every 3 months with a required 95% accuracy
 

eyrish8

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Ok you guys are scaring me

I code for radiology too, and we are required to code 500, in a 7 & 1/2 hour work day, for new coders. And then it increases over time, with more experience to 1000. And errors have to be less than 3% when auditing.
I have just finished CPT ICD-9 and am looking for a job right now. I take the certification exam june 14th. I love coding but oh man my stomach is turning reading all your stories. Does it come easy when you get hired. Do they train you on the software? I only know how to code from just going to the book. Will it be hard finding a job being I am a beginner? I have sent resumes out and have not heard from anyone!!!

would you give me your experiences when you were first hird
Thanks
kel
 
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ShawnS

Hello,
First you need to make sure you are comparing apples to apples. All standards need to be based on your particular situation.

If your coders have to flip through pages and pages of hand written notes you should not expect them to be as efficient as one that has a very sharp templated electronic note system.

You need to take into account the types of procedures they are having to code. A complicated cardiothoracic case is definately going to take longer than a tonsillectomy. Coders that code the same thing day after day should be more productive than perhaps a Trauma coder.

Another factor that can play a role in coding ED can be the facility coding. My coders code both the physician and the hospital services, so their productivity looks low compared to ED coders that only code the professional side if you are comparing charts per hour.

You really need to determine what levels of coding you have occurring in your establishment. Look at your best coders and consider them above the standard and then rank all of your coders by length of time coding and experience. Then I would try to sort through either giving a weight to CPT codes or using an overall charts per hour scale.

Hang in there!
 
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Ruth N Egipciaco

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Productivity

Productivity standards are based upon specialty and Company requirements. You need to take in consideration the fact of work flow, enviroment and tools-material provided to coders and auditors to performed their assigments.

(eg- if the coder-auditor is performing straight coding without the need of searching for information missing on the record, it would take less time than coders that have to request and search for information).

Coding for XRays, EKG's, PFT and similiar coding is more straight forward than coding for surgeries and family practice. The used of "cheat sheets" are very helpfull. As you could see the lady who coded 400 reports for radiology went down to 150 reports for urology coding. That is because you need to read more and make sure the coding is supported by documented information including lab and path reports.

Our coding team productivity is 150-200 per day, for Family Practice and Specialties, and 400+ for Radiology Coding with a 95% accuracy.

Ruth Egipciaco, CPC, PCS
 
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