ICD-10-CM date proposed by CMS: October 1, 2011

berickson

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The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced Friday a long-awaited proposed regulation that would replace the ICD-9-CM code sets now used to report health care diagnoses and procedures with greatly expanded ICD-10-CM (diagnosis) and ICD-10-PCS (hospital procedure) code sets, effective Oct. 1, 2011. In a separate proposed regulation, HHS has proposed adopting the updated X12 standard, Version 5010, and the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs standard, Version D.0, for electronic transactions, such as health care claims. Version 5010 is essential to use of the ICD-10 codes.

View both regulations

The American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) lobbied successfully to delay implementation beyond its initial 2010 proposed date. AAPC believes, however, that the 2011 date will still create undo hardships in the industry, as it falls too soon on the heels of other significant regulatory changes that have burdened providers in recent years.

If you feel the implementation date should be pushed to a later time, submit your comments to CMS.

Submit Comments Electronically
(due by 5:00pm Eastern time on October 21):


Submit Comments by Mail (due by 5:00pm Eastern time on October 21):

Send one original and two copies to:
CMS-0013-P 3
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,
Department of Health and Human Services,
Attention: CMS-0013-P,
P.O. Box 8016,
Baltimore, MD 21244-8016.
 

janetlee

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ICD 10 manual....size and cost.

It certainely crosses my mind about the potential size and cost of the ICD `10 manual considering that it will consist of 155,000 codes verses the current 17,000. Anyone else's feedback on this???
 

kevbshields

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In my mind it provides the level of detail more reflective of what we've always wished ICD-9 would do for us.

Also, think what it might do for our salaries--they won't be teaching 10 in schools until after implementation.
 
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We as the leaders in our field should stop our procrastination. We should embrace the enevitable and welcome this new code set. We exsist to assist in these times. Why not become experts in this area, and show our clients why they have decided to use certified professionals.
 

coder911

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Okay, I just received the notification email from AAPC basically stating "Last chance to gripe about ICD-10".

My question is simply this, Why?!

I'm getting quite put off about how many times I've seen negative or anxiety-laden protests on the topic of implementing ICD-10. Seriously, it's gonna be the end of billing and coding, or even medicine? Come on. I mean how much information did we have to wade through to even start grasping coding? How many hours have been spent in self-education, listening to audio conferences, or attending workshops? We are continually learning and growing in our medical fields. It takes a great deal of commitment and unfaltering determination to actually "code" correctly and efficiently. Each time I read about how we need to push the dates back for ICD-10 because of how much of a hardship it will be, it causes me to scrunch up my face. It really starts to feel like no one thinks it can be done. That's just ridiculous though. Didn't every certified AAPC member have to take the same 5 hour examination I did? The one that I was told failed somewhere around 85% of test takers the first time through? Yet we all passed it, regardless if it was the first time through or not. I think that's a very good indication of how well equipped we are to deal with a situation like this.
As for the financial impact - what I can't know is the cost to each provider, clinic, hospital, insurance company, etc. - Yet, I do know it won't get any cheaper the longer we wait. Work labor and the required resources needed for this process are sure to inflate rather than deflate.
I sincerely feel that 3 years is more than enough time to implement and get things running correctly (for the most part). If everyone plans ahead, works efficiently, and implements smartly we should be ready to go. We have so many resources and networking opportunities - we need never be alone in this transition.
Of course we'll really need coders to be the backbone of this new look forward to ensure a correct and clean transition. I say, send the HHS a letter in support of it's decision to set a date in 2011 - we can handle this :p .Go team!
 
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Rhonda Buckholtz CPC

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Jason,
There is no possible way for a single physician to be able to implement both the 5010 rule and ICD-10 at the same time and in that timeframe. We need ICD-10, no doubt, but in order to protect our physicians we need a longer time frame.

The person who will pay the most from this other than providers are the consumers..... Health insurance plans will have to change every single NCD and policy on file in addition to system upgrades and that cost has to be put off on someone else unless there is a smooth gradual transition.

This is not about fighting the change but more about protecting the interest of our physicians who are already struggling to maintain some sort of financial balance.
 

coder911

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I'd like to first say that I do respect other people's opinions, even if the following reads to the contrary.
I am in obvious disagreement with delaying this implementation any longer than it already has. I've heard about ICD-10 since I began training for coding in 2003. It was something I was told to be prepared for.
In fact, a draft of ICD-10-CM was created in 2003 and complied with testing from both the AMA and AHIMA - this should have been the first solid sign for insurance companies to start creating their crosswalked policies (From the currently used ICD-9 to the proposed future of coding, ICD-10). That was 5 years ago. They have updated ICD-10 since then, in 2007, using the same type of guidelines used to update ICD-9. So no huge surprises to the ICD-10 manual (at least, none that coders aren't already used to ;) ).
ICD-10 has been used to code mortality data in the states since 1999. This isn't the clinical modification version we'll be using for our typical coding - but still a convention of ICD-10. Once again, this should have been at least the whisper of a hint to start planning for what's to come.
I'm not denying it will be a burden in multiple ways for many offices in many different settings - provider or payor. I just don't see how the cost will be less in the future. I know AAPC members have great resolve, and we're used to doing more with less - especially in these economically stressful times. Maybe we should push for legislation to create minimal financial impact for consumers from the premiums incrued by their insurance carriers (which keep skyrocketing without the implementation of the 5010 or ICD-10, by the way) for not being more prepared to deal with this situation. I feel that most provider's offices and software vendors should be able to handle this transition over the course of three years without making huge holes in their budgets. If they have certified AAPC members on staff - they have an enormous advantage to overcoming this unavoidable obstacle (date TBA).
 

MJ4ever

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ICD-10-CM training

Does the AAPC provide any web based training/classes for the ICD-10-CM?

Thanks in advance,
 

Rhonda Buckholtz CPC

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We will be providing some great education and are in the process of developing the curriculum now. Details will be forthcoming.
 
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I'd like to first say that I do respect other people's opinions, even if the following reads to the contrary.
I am in obvious disagreement with delaying this implementation any longer than it already has. I've heard about ICD-10 since I began training for coding in 2003. It was something I was told to be prepared for.
In fact, a draft of ICD-10-CM was created in 2003 and complied with testing from both the AMA and AHIMA - this should have been the first solid sign for insurance companies to start creating their crosswalked policies (From the currently used ICD-9 to the proposed future of coding, ICD-10). That was 5 years ago. They have updated ICD-10 since then, in 2007, using the same type of guidelines used to update ICD-9. So no huge surprises to the ICD-10 manual (at least, none that coders aren't already used to ;) ).
ICD-10 has been used to code mortality data in the states since 1999. This isn't the clinical modification version we'll be using for our typical coding - but still a convention of ICD-10. Once again, this should have been at least the whisper of a hint to start planning for what's to come.
I'm not denying it will be a burden in multiple ways for many offices in many different settings - provider or payor. I just don't see how the cost will be less in the future. I know AAPC members have great resolve, and we're used to doing more with less - especially in these economically stressful times. Maybe we should push for legislation to create minimal financial impact for consumers from the premiums incrued by their insurance carriers (which keep skyrocketing without the implementation of the 5010 or ICD-10, by the way) for not being more prepared to deal with this situation. I feel that most provider's offices and software vendors should be able to handle this transition over the course of three years without making huge holes in their budgets. If they have certified AAPC members on staff - they have an enormous advantage to overcoming this unavoidable obstacle (date TBA).
Jason, Excellently stated and thanks!
 

fredabrinson

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ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS

I am also in support of the 2011 proposed implementation date for ICD-10. I read as much info as I could locate prior to commenting to CMS. I discussed the proposed rule with coworkers throughout my facility and in other professional circles. While there are definitely components in the proposed rule that need refining, the implementation date itself was not something other professional organizations opposed. In addition, while CMS will read all the comments submitted to them on any proposed rule, it is very unlikely that the same comment letter recevied over and over and over again will carry much weight.

I feel CMS provided Coders with a great compliment, estimating about 5 days for us to become educated and proficient in ICD-10! I believe CMS recognizes our committment to coding and our abilities to continuing learning and growing in our field.

I do understand the concerns of the physicians, with other regulation implementations also being due in or around the same time frame, but these are issues hospitals and other healthcare providers have faced for years. OPPS in August 2000 was huge for hospitals, as was the implentation of DRG's back in the 1980's. There are times when healthcare requires big changes. ICD-10 is just another one of those times.
 

lvillers

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Details are still being worked out, but in order to maintain continued employer confidence in the CPC® credential and a certified coder’s ability to code “current” code sets, AAPC will open a window of time (probably two years, and beginning one year prior to the final implementation date) for CPCs to pass an un-proctored, open book, and online 50-75 question test that focuses on ICD-10-CM and other new codes. The test will be low-cost and provide multiple opportunities to pass.
 

SVarney

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AAPC is offering 1-2 day Boot Camps across the country; they also have online recordings to help prepare. They also have a practice assessment you can purchase.
 
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